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Cycle Campaign News May 2014

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Space for Cycling ride
Space for Cycling: Big Ride, London (Photo: Ben Hughes)
CTC's monthly digest of cycle campaigning news - all in one place...
Contents Summary: 

 

From the Editor

The coming warmer, drier weather will undoubtedly inspire more people to cycle - it always does.

More space for cycling would be an even bigger boost and, judging by the popular and political support for the messages of both the London and national Space for Cycling campaigns, thousands agree.

If you haven't done so already, do get involved in spreading the word - see 'Headlines' below for more.

Cherry Allan

CTC Campaigns

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Previous Publication: 

New publications

Space for Cycling: A guide for local decision makers (CTC)

Succinct, 7-page guide for councillors to accompany CTC’s Space for Cycling campaign. Explains the case for cycling and the principles of planning for cycling, looking at protected space on main roads, at junctions and crossings, lower speeds, reducing through traffic, routes in green space, positive promotion – and, importantly, how to find the funding.

Making Space for Cycling: a guide for new developments and street renewals (2nd edition)

Published by Cyclenation with funding from Bike Hub & written by Cambridge Cycling Campaign

Endorsed by CTC and other partners, this complements CTC’s own Space for Cycling guide (see above). It demonstrates the kind of high quality infrastructure needed to generate high levels of cycling. It also shows how different this approach is to the current outdated practice that is too prevalent in the UK. Illustrated mostly by photographs, it looks at design principles, permeability, design solutions, local streets, primary and secondary streets, major roads between urban areas, short cuts and pleasant off-road leisure routes, cycle parking and a walking-friendly environment.

Handbook for cycle-friendly design (Sustrans)

35-page manual providing detailed technical advice on key issues relating to on and off highway cycle infrastructure. Part of a suite of largely web-based technical guidance currently under development.

Offers a concise, illustrated compendium intended to stand alone as a ‘tool box’ of ideas, whilst also linking to relevant on-line resources. Encourages planners to develop designs that reflect how people are taught to cycle through National Standards Training, and features ‘Top Ten Tips’ for user-focused design (Tip No. 1 = ‘Cyclists are important’). Includes innovative cycling facilities rarely used in the UK but which are established practice in other countries (e.g. two-stage right turns at traffic signals and hybrid cycle lanes).

Endorsed by the Institution of Civil Engineers, the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport, and the Transport Planning Society.

Road Risk and Vulnerable Road User Working Paper (TfL)

Summary of TfL’s understanding of the level of risk experienced by road users in London, with a detailed analysis of how pedestrians, cyclists and motorcycle riders come to be injured on the capital’s streets. Finds that cyclists are most commonly injured as a result of other vehicles turning across their path and from collisions with vehicles they are travelling alongside. In 2011, HGVs turning left across the path of a cyclist was the most common type of conflict where a cyclist was killed or seriously injured by a large goods vehicle (3.5+ tonnes).

Walking and Cycling (SPICe, the Scottish Parliament Information Centre)

Summarises Scottish walking and cycling statistics, policy and funding plus other related topical issues. It also includes short case studies of successful plans and projects that are increasing the number of people walking and cycling.

Bicycles UK 2014 (Mintel)

Market information report with in-depth analysis. Says: “The UK bicycles market has continued to grow in the past year, despite the tough economic conditions and the squeeze on household incomes. Most of this growth has come from consumers trading up to slightly more expensive models of bicycle”. The research also reveals “substantial misgivings about the safety of cycling on the UK’s roads and it is this which is the biggest barrier to increasing participation levels at the moment.”

The report also considers a number of questions, including: the implications for the bicycles market of concerns about safety; what might encourage lapsed riders back to, or new riders into, cycling; and how to expand the base of people who commute by cycle. However, the report does cost £1,750!

London Coroners preventing deaths: A five year review (2008-13)  (RoadPeace)

Review finding that very few London coroners took action and issued ‘Preventing Further Death’ (formerly ‘Rule 43’) reports to the responsible authorities calling for action to reduce the risk of road deaths. It finds that only 4% of road death inquests led to a report. Includes a list of a number of reports that were produced and sent to various bodies, including Transport for London and the DfT.

Cyclists and Cycling Around the World: Creating Liveable and Bikeable Cities

(Edited by Lotte Bech, Juan Carlos Dextre & Mike Hughes)

Book offering 25 articles by different authors from a range of countries all on the subject of good practice in cycling provision, but covering a wide variety of topics from teaching the very young to ride, to cyclists’ grass-roots democracy in Chile.

 

 

Bicycling and Walking in the United States: 2014 Benchmarking Report (Alliance for Biking and Walking)

A massive compendium of data and research on walking and bicycling in all 50 US states, 52 of the most populous cities, and 17 mid-sized cities. Also offers a wealth of relevant data on active transportation throughout the United States.
 

 

 

 

 

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