Local Transport Plans

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Cycling and local transport

To maximise cycling's benefits for local communities, councils should give it a central role in their transport plans and link it strongly with other policies and strategies...
Female cyclist
Headline Messages: 
  • Local authorities’ transport policies and spending plans should place cycling at the heart of their wider strategies to promote active and sustainable travel. These strategies should recognise and aim to maximise the full range of cycling’s benefits for health and the environment; the mobility it offers for people of different ages, backgrounds and abilities; its role in creating safer and more pleasant streets; and the economic benefits and cost-saving it can provide for individuals, employers and the local authority itself.
  • Councils should make commitments in their local transport plans and policies, and cycle-specific strategies, to create a cycle-friendly environment and to focus on encouraging people from all backgrounds to take up cycling, or to cycle more often.
  • Councils should forge partnerships with employers, schools and colleges, the health sector, the police, public transport operators, local volunteer groups and others, to maximise their support for and contribution to their vision for cycling.
CTC View (formal statement of CTC's policy): 

Local authorities should:

  • Commit to cycling by: fully recognising its environmental, health and other benefits; linking cycling with the wider aims of local transport and other policies, especially by aiming for more as well as safer cycling and tackling the deterrents (e.g. speeding, bad driving, hostile road conditions and lorries); linking cycling plans with other strategies/policies (e.g. planning, health, education and the economy); and forging partnerships with other local partners in health, education, business public transport, the police and voluntary sector groups.
  • Make the physical environment cycle-friendly by: ensuring that developments are accessible and permeable by cycle; that highways are engineered, laid out, signed and maintained with cycle users in mind; and enhancing provision for recreational and off-road cycling.
  • Promote cycling by: making national standards cycle training (Bikeability) available to people of all ages; supporting school and workplace travel plans and incentives; and encouraging cycling with promotional materials, campaigns and personal advice.
  • Resource their commitment to cycling well by: raising and investing capital, revenue and staff resources, training staff appropriately and harnessing the support of the voluntary sector.
  • Evaluate and monitor the results effectively by: setting substantial targets to increase cycle use; measuring cycle casualties per mile or per trip; monitoring how safe people think cycling is; identifying suitable data collection and reporting mechanisms; and seeking feedback from key partners, including local communities and the voluntary sector. 
Download full campaigns briefing: 
Publication Date: 
August 2013
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  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

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