Cycling Delivery Plan

SamJones's picture

CTC's week in Westminster

18 October 2014
Funding4Cycling, Cycling Delivery Plan, Parliamentary cycling debate, new cycle research – a lot has happened this week in UK cycling. CTC sums it all up.
Big Ben

With a Commons debate on cycling scheduled for Thursday 16th October, this was never going to be a quiet week, but it has turned out to be busier than we could ever have imagined.

The subject of the debate was supposed to be the Government's long overdue Cycling Delivery Plan. This Plan, originally promised in August 2013 (when the Prime Minister announced his wish to launch a 'cycling revolution), was originally supposed to come out in Autumn 2013. However it has been postponed many times over the following year, right up to less than a week before the debate.

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SamJones's picture

Government cycling strategy a "derisory plan, not a delivery plan"

Government's Cycling Delivery Plan, published two hours before key parliamentary debate, fails to make commitments to funding for cycling.
Broken bike

Just minutes before the scheduled start of a House of Commons debate on the future of cycling in Britain, the Government finally released its draft Cycling Delivery Plan, a year after it was due.

Making a mockery of Parliament’s role to scrutinise Government strategy and policy, the draft Plan lacks any firm commitments to provide the funding for cycling needed to make it a safe and attractive option for day-to-day journeys, for people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities.

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Chris Peck's picture

Why models matter: CTC meets with the DfT's modelling team

Yesterday (22nd January), CTC met with officials from the Department for Transport to discuss how the National Transport Model deals with cycling. Chris Peck explains why the model matters, and what CTC wants to see changed.
What would Britain look like if we reached Dutch levels of cycling?

In November last year, CTC revealed that the Department's transport model forecast cycling levels would fall between 2015 and 2035.

At the time we questioned both why this was forecast, whether the forecast was accurate, and asked DfT officials for a meeting in order to discuss our concerns.

Roger Geffen's picture

Government planning to fail on cycling

Despite huge public and cross-party parliamentary support for substantially increased cycle use between now and 2050, the Government is expecting cycle use to FALL between 2015 and 2025, with little change between then and 2040.
Transport Model forecast for cycling 2010-2040

New figures, obtained by CTC through a parliamentary question, suggest that the Government's 'National Transport Model' is predicting an initial increase in cycle use, due to the economic downturn (from 2.9 bn miles in 2010 to 3.4 bn miles in 2015).

Roger Geffen's picture

CTC in 3-day talks on delivering PM's "Cycling Revolution"

CTC has had 3 days of discussions with the Department for Transport's cycling policy team about what both they and we hope will be a genuinely "ambitious" Cycling Delivery Plan. But we face clear challenges too.
CTC has had three days of discussions with DfT

Earlier this week (on October 21st to 23rd), CTC hosted 3 days of talks with members of the Department for Transport's cycling policy team at CTC's national office.

These mainly focused on our aspirations for what should be included in the Government's forthcoming 'Cycling Delivery Plan', which will outline how David Cameron's promised 'Cycling Revolution' is to be achieved.

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