Safe Drivers and Vehicles

RhiaFavero's picture

Road Justice campaign meets with Sentencing Council

CTC's Road Justice campaign, along with partners British Cycling and RoadPeace, met this week with the Sentencing Council to discuss the forthcoming review of sentencing guidelines for driving offences.
Victims rarely feel justice is done when a driver is sentenced

Drivers are being treated excessively leniently by the justice system, particularly at the point of sentencing, which demonstrates it is in need of a complete overhaul. 

The Government announced a review of the guidelines last year but has since postponed the review until the Ministry of Justice has revised current legislation concerning motoring offences.


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Chris Peck's picture

Goodwill reiterates footway cycling guidance

National media has become very excited about Cycling Minister Robert Goodwill's affirmation that police should not fine cyclists on the pavement if they are there through a fear of traffic. However, CTC believes that it is better to improve road conditions for cyclists and offer cycle training.
Police should use discretion when penalising cyclists on the pavement

Goodwill had mentioned in a letter his support for the principle that police should use their discretion when fining cyclists on the pavement. 

This reiterates guidance from Home Office ministers 15 years ago - when the fixed penalty notice for cycling on the pavement was created.

Chris Peck's picture

Cycling through the floods

The last few weeks of flooding have brought challenges and dangers, and shows how fragile our cycling infrastructure is. Chris Peck examines some of the problems the flooded conditions have brought - and asks for your experiences.
The River Wey and towpath - normally a cycle route

Ok, so maybe we're just a bunch of southern softies, but the rain has brought problems beyond just a few pairs of wet socks.

I cycle five miles to work each day, with a few options to play with, one of which is the River Wey towpath, a lovely traffic-free route in dry weather.

Another route is a fiddly cycle path, involving a few steps and a bridge you have to walk over.

Unfortunately, both of these routes are currently under deep water in many places and have considerable postdiluvian damage to embankments and surface.

RhiaFavero's picture

Drivers have 1 in 10 chance of going to jail for killing a cyclist

The London Evening Standard reported this week that drivers in London have a one in 10 chance of going to jail if they are involved in the death of a cyclist.
1 in 10 drivers jailed for causing a cyclists' death, many more not prosecuted

The newspaper analysed police data on the 40 cyclists killed in the capital between 2010 and 2012 and found that only 4 of the drivers involved had been sent to prison.

CTC's picture

CTC launch iPhone 'Crash Kit' app

CTC, the national cycling charity, has launched an iPhone app to make it simpler to record vital details if you are involved in a cycling incident. Crashes rarely happen, but CTC's new kit is there for you, just in case.
CTC's Crash Kit on iPhone

Firstly, CTC is keen to point out that cycling helps keep people fit and that crashes are rare. In the event of an incident, however, CTC's new Crash Kit app will help you to be prepared for any legal action.

The app allows you to record all necessary information about the incident, including: witness contact details; third party contact and vehicle details; weather conditions; photos of the scene; equipment damage; any injuries; and the time, date and location via GPS.

You can then send the report directly to CTC’s solicitors, Slater & Gordon Lawyers.

Cherry Allan's picture

CTC welcomes official go-ahead for lights to help cyclists at junctions

News that the Department for Transport (DfT) has finally given the go-ahead to ‘low-level’ traffic lights has been welcomed by CTC, who have long campaigned for the move.
Low-level lights will help cyclists at junctions

The mini, cycle-specific lights help cyclists at junctions because they repeat the signal displayed on the main traffic lights at a level that makes them easier for people on bikes to see. The lights are already a common sight in most other European countries and proved very popular during track-based trials in the UK.


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Chris Peck's picture

Minister proposes innovative solutions to cycle safety

Transport Minister Robert Goodwill has only been in post for a couple of months, but after the terrible string of deaths in London, cycling has come to dominate his portfolio. The Transport Select Committee took evidence from him this week, many of his responses were encouraging.
Robert Goodwill before the Transport Select Committee

In his evidence to the Transport Select Committee, he was well-briefed and offered some refreshing opinions on cycle safety and increasing cycling.

He's an experienced cyclist and has also driven lorries, putting him in a unique position to comment on the needs of both.

A cyclist - and a lorry driver


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Cherry Allan's picture

A thousand cyclists and pedestrians 'die-in' in London

On Friday evening, 29 November, a thousand people took part in a peaceful die-in and vigil outside Transport for London's offices. The message for the authorities was simple - help stop the killing of cyclists and pedestrians in London. CTC's Cherry Allan and Rhia Weston were there.
A thousand people joined the 'Stop Killing Cyclists' event in London

We were lying amongst prone bikes on the tarmac of a London road, in the dark, on a cold evening in November, gathered round a 'Stop Killing Cyclists' banner. A thousand other people were doing the same and 'protesting’ certainly described what we were doing - but not quite.

RhiaFavero's picture

Metropolitan Police traffic head talks directly to CTC about cyclist fines

Following reports that the Metropolitan Police had set a target for officers to fine 40 cyclists in 4 months, I heard from Detective Chief Superintendent Glyn Jones, the head of the Met's traffic police unit.

You will see below that DCS Jones describes the internal target-setting memo as a misinterpretation of his instructions. CTC welcomes this, but we sought his assurance that no police officers in London still have targets to fine cyclists.

His response was that the original target set was intended to target dangerous behaviour by both motorists and cyclists and that only those who commit an offence would receive a FPN. He has not clarified whether or not these targets are still in place.

Roger Geffen's picture

Police should tackle real danger, not fine cyclists just to meet targets

CTC has condemned a Metropolitan Police memo setting police officers a target to fine 40 cyclists in 4 months, or 10 per month.
Police officers stop cyclist (photo by Manic Street Preacher, CC licence)

The memo, issued by Inspector Colin Davies and revealed in the Times, says “Officers have four months to do 40 cycle tickets. Ten per month… This will give them a renewed focus for a while.”  The memo was issued on 18 November, the day on which charity worker Richard Muzira was killed by a lorry in Camberwell, the sixth cyclist to die in 13 days on London’s roads.

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