Safe Drivers and Vehicles

Cherry Allan's picture

Motorbikes

Motorcyclists and cyclists have much in common, but motorcycling poses more risk to others and does not offer the same environmental benefits...
Cyclist and motorcyclist
Headline Messages: 
  • As vulnerable road users, cyclists and motorcyclists share much common ground.
  • However, CTC is concerned that cyclists and pedestrians are more at risk from motorcycles than they are from cars. We are also concerned about the impact that more motorcycling could have on the environment. 
  • We therefore support policies to improve motorcyclists’ safety but, given the need to restrain motor traffic in general, we do not support actions intended to increase the use of motorcycles, or those that might have this effect.
CTC View (formal statement of CTC's policy): 
  • CTC recognises that motorcyclists and cyclists share a number of road safety problems, but is concerned that cyclists and pedestrians are more at risk from PTWs than they are from cars. 
  • National and local motorcycling policies should be informed by a comprehensive, Government-led assessment of the effects that a greater take-up of motorcycling might have. This should look at its impact on:
    • the safety (both actual and perceived) of (would-be) pedestrians and cyclists
    • the promotion and attractiveness of the cleaner, healthier, quieter and more sustainable alternatives of walking and cycling
    • the environment (pollutants and noise)
    • congestion 
  • PTWs should not be allowed in bus lanes, advanced stop lines (ASLs), vehicle-restricted areas or locations where pedal cycles enjoy exemptions from vehicle restrictions. This must necessarily apply to all PTWs, as larger, faster and more polluting machines make up the majority of the PTW fleet and it is not practical to provide traffic regulation benefits for the safest and cleanest machines alone.
Download full campaigns briefing: 
Publication Date: 
January 2014
Cherry Allan's picture

Cyclists' behaviour and the law

Cyclists should behave responsibly and legally, but the law should recognise that they do little harm and should not have to choose between keeping safe and obeying rules...
Cyclists
Headline Messages: 
  • Cyclists should behave responsibly and within the law. However, cyclists pose little risk to others.
  • Cyclists should not have to choose between acting legally and keeping safe (e.g. children prohibited from cycling on the footway even alongside busy roads). The law and those applying it should take this into account, as should the planning and design of the road network.
  • Whilst we encourage cyclists to undertake cycle training and to have insurance cover, making training or licences compulsory for cyclists is unworkable and would deter people from cycling occasionally or giving cycling a try. It would not solve any problems and the running costs would be prohibitive.
CTC View (formal statement of CTC's policy): 
  • Cyclists, like all road users, should behave responsibly and within the law.
  • The enforcement of road traffic rules, and penalties for breaching them, should be proportionate to the potential danger imposed on other people, especially vulnerable road users. This principle also applies to off-road rights of way.
  • Road traffic rules should not put cyclists in situations where they feel they must choose between acting legally and protecting their own safety. Those responsible for making and enforcing the rules must take into account the reasons behind cyclists’ offending behaviour.
  • CTC does not condone unlawful cycling on pavement (footway). However, the police should exercise discretion in the use of fixed penalty notices for pavement cycling and discriminate between those whose behaviour is dangerous and antisocial and those who are acting out of concern for their own safety without presenting any threat to others.
  • The police and others charged with applying the law should be able to send offending cyclists on training programmes as an alternative to prosecution or fixed penalty notices.
  • Highway authorities should tackle any hazardous road conditions or poor design that may explain illegal behaviour by cyclists in certain locations.
  • A system of compulsory licensing and cycle training is unworkable and unjustifiable, not least because children have the same legal rights to cycle as adults and expecting them to hold licences is impractical. While the running costs would be high (i.e. similar to schemes that apply to motor vehicles and drivers), the benefits would be negligible, and the bureaucracy involved likely to seriously deter newcomers or occasional cyclists.
  • CTC does not actively support Critical Mass, but recognises the motivation of those involved.
Download full campaigns briefing: 
Publication Date: 
January 2014
CTC's picture

CTC launch iPhone 'Crash Kit' app

CTC, the national cycling charity, has launched an iPhone app to make it simpler to record vital details if you are involved in a cycling incident. Crashes rarely happen, but CTC's new kit is there for you, just in case.
CTC's Crash Kit on iPhone

Firstly, CTC is keen to point out that cycling helps keep people fit and that crashes are rare. In the event of an incident, however, CTC's new Crash Kit app will help you to be prepared for any legal action.

The app allows you to record all necessary information about the incident, including: witness contact details; third party contact and vehicle details; weather conditions; photos of the scene; equipment damage; any injuries; and the time, date and location via GPS.

You can then send the report directly to CTC’s solicitors, Slater & Gordon Lawyers.

Cherry Allan's picture

A thousand cyclists and pedestrians 'die-in' in London

On Friday evening, 29 November, a thousand people took part in a peaceful die-in and vigil outside Transport for London's offices. The message for the authorities was simple - help stop the killing of cyclists and pedestrians in London. CTC's Cherry Allan and Rhia Weston were there.
A thousand people joined the 'Stop Killing Cyclists' event in London

We were lying amongst prone bikes on the tarmac of a London road, in the dark, on a cold evening in November, gathered round a 'Stop Killing Cyclists' banner. A thousand other people were doing the same and 'protesting’ certainly described what we were doing - but not quite.

Action on lorries

Lorries pose a serious risk to cyclists in urban areas
CTC believes that the danger and intimidation from lorries, especially in urban areas, has to be tackled now.
Roger Geffen's picture

Boris must stop ducking responsibility for action to save lives

CTC's Campaigns Director Roger Geffen argues that Boris's "finger-pointing" is pointed in the wrong direction, and calls for real solutions to the dangers faced by pedestrians as well as cyclists.
Boris is accused of mis-representing how cyclists die. Photo: Yurri (CC licence)

There has been a truly appalling death-toll on London’s roads in the past 13 days.  Prior to November 5th, there had been 8 cyclist fatalities in 10 months this year.  Since then, we have 6 cyclists’ and 3 pedestrians’ deaths within 13 days, all killed by lorries, coaches or buses.  In total, 9 of the 14 fatalities this year have involved lorries.

Cherry Allan's picture

Common driving offences

Tackling common, bad driving offences effectively would help create a safer and more attractive environment for cycling and walking....
Driver at wheel of car
Headline Messages: 

Tackling common bad driving offences effectively would help create a safer and more attractive environment for cycling and walking. In particular, the drink/drive limit should be lowered and hands-free mobile phones banned.

'Common Driving Offences' is one of a series of CTC briefings covering various aspects of traffic law and enforcement. Others consider bad driving in the context of the legal framework in general and specific aspects of it including sentencing, prosecution, the courts, the vital role of the traffic police, and driver training, testing and licencing (forthcoming).

CTC View (formal statement of CTC's policy): 

Exceeding the speed limit

  • Speeding fines are currently too low to have any significant impact on driver behaviour.
  • Extreme speed (e.g. 20mph+ over the limit) should be treated as dangerous driving in the first instance.
  • There should be no margin over the speed limit at which a driver avoids penalty.

Drink/drug driving

  • The drink drive blood alcohol limit should be lowered from 80mg/100ml to not more than 50mg/100ml, in line with most European countries. Novice drivers should not be allowed to drink at all before driving.
  • We support the use of targeted checkpoints, but also believe that the police should be given more freedom to carry out random breath testing.
  • Alcohol interlocks should be fitted in offenders’ vehicles. If successful, the measure should be extended.
  • The definitions and standards for drug-related driving offences should relate solely to whether a drug impairs the ability to drive; it should not relate to whether it is legal to use it - i.e. over-the-counter and prescription drugs should be included.

Mobile phones

  • Use of hands-free mobile phones whilst driving should be banned.
  • More research needs to be done on the impact of other in-car distractions (e.g. SatNavs, radios, in-car computers etc). Drivers who put others in danger because they have been distracted by such devices need to be appropriately penalised.

Driving without entitlement

  • Any driver convicted of a bad driving offence whilst unlicensed or disqualified should receive a custodial sentence for the crime.
Download full campaigns briefing: 
Publication Date: 
November 2013
David Cox's picture

Reflecting on World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims

Yesterday, the third Sunday of November, was World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims. Events and services took place throughout the UK and CTC's Chair of Council, David Cox, joined a rememberance ride in Birmingham.
RoadPeace Memorial at the National Memorial Arboretum

This day focuses on both the overall scale and the individual devastation caused by road deaths and injuries, and the impact upon families and communities around the world. 

Almost 4,000 people are killed and many hundreds of thousands injured on roads throughout the world every day.  Many more have to cope with bereavement or the effects of injury, and thus become part of the huge group of people affected by road carnage. 

RhiaWeston's picture

Road Justice local campaigners receive media training

This week, Road Justice local campaigners attended a day of media training to equip them with the skills to raise awareness of the Road Justice campaign in their area and to press local decision makers to improve road safety.
Campaigner Mick Nott doing a pre-recorded interview

The training was held at the Sheffield offices of Slater & Gordon Lawyers, the sponsors of the Road Justice campaign. Slater & Gordon operate CTC’s legal advice phoneline. The Slater & Gordon Road Traffic Incident team attended the first half of the day’s training and were on hand to answer any legal questions.

CTC's picture

CTC condemns rising cyclists' death toll in London.

CTC, the national cycling charity demands action on cyclists’ safety in London after fifth cyclist is killed in ten days on the capital’s roads.

 

In a week where the total number of cyclists killed in London this year rose to a staggering 13, 8 of which were involved in collisions with lorries, CTC is calling for major changes to be made to the design of lorries, to the design of major junctions and to driver training, to avert more unnecessary deaths.

Contact Information: 

Media enquiries CTC Senior Communications Officer Laura Raymond 07960 349405

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