Safe Drivers and Vehicles

RhiaWeston's picture

Cyclist to challenge Fixed Penalty Notice after £2300 raised for legal fees.

Cyclists have shown overwhelming support for Alex Paxton's challenge of the FPN he received a few weeks ago. Individual donors have given a total of £2669.50. Alex has submitted his request for a hearing in the Magistrates court to contest the FPN.
Alex Paxton is challenging an unfairly issued FPN

Alex had intended to position himself in the cyclists’ box in order to turn right, but found that the box had been illegally occupied by a motorist. With concern for his own safety were he to stay in the inside lane and then have to cross three lanes of moving traffic in order to turn right, he decided to position himself ahead of the traffic and ahead of the Advanced Stop Line (ASL).

Victoria Hazael's picture

Remove the centre line to increase safety

New study funded by CTC finds 20 mph speed limits and the removal of centre-lines may be the most effective ways to reduce the speed at which drivers overtake cyclists.
20 mph speed limit sign painted on a road

In a study published this week, Professor John Parkin and Stella Shackel observed a reduction of speed of vehicles passing cyclists on roads with no centre line. A centre line may present a visual clue about where a driver should ‘drive up to’. Its absence may cause the driver to consider his or her road position and speed more carefully.

Lowering speed limits to 20 mph was also found to be associated with lower overtaking speed, whereas the presence of a cycle lane was not associated with either any differences in distance or speed of passing motor traffic.

Contact Information: 

CTC Press Office
Email: publicity@ctc.org.uk
Telephone: 07786320713/ 01483 238 315

John Parkin: 0117 3286367

Notes to Editors: 

1. The Study reference is ‘Shackel, S. and Parkin, J. (2014) Measuring the influence of on-road features and driver behaviour on proximity and speed of vehicles overtaking cyclists. Accident analysis and prevention 73, December, pp100-108’ available free  until 3rd November 2014 at : http://authors.elsevier.com/a/1Ph-nLDQchXW

2.    John Parkin is Professor of Transport Engineering, University of  the West of England. John.parkin@uwe.ac.uk 0117 3286367.
3.    Stella C. Shackel, Institute for Transport Studies, University of Leeds

CTC, the UK’s largest cycling charity, inspires and helps people to cycle and keep cycling, whatever kind of cycling they do or would like to do. Over a century’s experience tells us that cycling is more than useful transport; it makes you feel good, gives you a sense of freedom and creates a better environment for everyone.

• We provide expert, practical help and advice.
• We support individuals and communities.
• We protect cyclists’ interests.
• We campaign to make cycling mainstream and to remove the things that stop people cycling.
• We help people develop the confidence and skills to cycle.
• We promote the benefits of cycling to individuals, to society and to the economy.

 

Chris Juden's picture

Dazzling bike lights

Time was, when the suggestion that a bike lamp could be too bright would have been laughable. How times change. CTC's Chris Juden explains that thanks to developments in LEDs and rechargeable batteries, our dim and unreliable ‘bobby dodgers’ have become bobby dazzlers!
Beam pattern of Exposure Strada

The headlamps on cars have also become brighter and augmented by rows of LED daytime running lights. It seems like we’re in a lighting arms race. But thanks to a lack of regulation on our side, it’s an arms race some cyclists are winning! And people are starting to notice.

That’s no bad thing you may think; we need to be noticed more, for safety’s sake. But not when one person’s safety is won at the cost of another’s distress and loss of safety, including other cyclists.

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RhiaWeston's picture

Lorry driver sentenced but spotlight needed on operators

If ever there was a case that demonstrated the need to impose immediate interim driving bans on drivers that kill cyclists, this is it. CTC's Road Safety Campaigner Rhia Weston examines the evidence.
Lorries are involved in 18% of cyclists' deaths per year in Great Britain

The 32-year-old lorry driver who caused the deaths of two cyclists on the A30 in July 2013 was sentenced this week to seven and a half years for each death, to be served concurrently.

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Bristol Road Justice campaigners put pressure on police

Bristol Cycling Campaign (BCyC) is an excellent example of a group of local campaigners who have wholeheartedly got behind the Road Justice campaign by ramping up pressure on their local force to improve roads policing.
Road Justice map of police pledges

One element of the Road Justice campaign is for campaigners to put pressure on their local police force to pledge to implement the recommendations in the report ‘Road Justice: the role of the police’ and then to monitor the force’s progress in implementing those recommendations, all of which are aimed at improving police handling of road traffic collisions. 

Victoria Hazael's picture

Cyclist fatalities and serious injuries down for 2013, but no room for complacency

The release of the latest reported road casualties for Great Britain show that cyclist serious injuries and deaths dropped in 2013. Combined with the news earlier this month that cycle use has risen slightly, this looks like a positive story.
Police and Ambulance attending a road crash
 
Slight injuries to cyclists, however, rose by 3% between 2012 and 2013, and one year’s figures shouldn’t in any case make anyone, not least the Government, complacent. We need to put Space for Cycling on the political agenda at both national and local level, to ensure that Britain can capitalise on not only more, but safer cycling in the future. 
 
Chris Peck, Campaigns and Policy Co-ordinator for CTC, responded to the new figures saying: “These statistics are generally good news for cycling.
Contact Information: 

CTC Press Office
Email: publicity@ctc.org.uk
Telephone: 0844-736-8453

Notes to Editors: 

The risk of cycling is based on the number of cyclist road deaths (109 in 2013) per mile cycled (5 bn kms in 2013). Similar data for 1990-2013 (reproduced from Department for Transport data) can be found in the table below.

A link to CTC’s calculation of the risk of death whilst cycling: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/10cH3ULsFOKvKc_Nv7BVkHHn7AwMIOp2rxZ4byFG4GOo/edit#gid=331815480

Casualty figures are here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reported-road-casualties-in-great-britain-main-results-2013

CTC, the UK’s largest cycling charity, inspires and helps people to cycle and keep cycling, whatever kind of cycling they do or would like to do. We have been around since 1878 and a charity for only two years. 
 
We provide expert, practical help and advice.
We support individuals and communities. 
We protect cyclists’ interests. 
We campaign to make cycling mainstream and to remove the things that stop people cycling. 
We help people develop the confidence and skills to cycle. 
We promote the benefits of cycling to individuals, to society and to the economy.
 
 
 
RhiaWeston's picture

EU ministers confirm eight year delay on safer lorry designs

EU ministers approve eight year delay on introducing HGV safety measures that could save hundreds of lives every year.
Renault truck with large side windows

CTC and other cycling and sustainable transport organisations wrote to the Transport Secretary, Patrick McLoughlin, in May, urging him to support the proposed regulations. He supported the proposals but on June 5, EU ministers approved an eight year delay on introducing the life-saving measures.

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Cherry Allan's picture

Daylight saving

Shifting the UK’s clocks to give one extra hour of daylight in the evening and one less in the morning would affect everyone. Research should help decide if cyclists would benefit...
Cyclist on path
Headline Messages: 
  • Currently, many hours of daylight are ‘lost’ in the morning. Aligning UK time with Central European Time (CET) may bring considerable economic and environmental benefits because people would have more light for leisure activities in the evening and need less energy for lighting.
  • It is possible that a shift to CET would also result in fewer road crashes overall, although an increase on winter mornings may occur.

Note: This briefing is about proposals to shift the UK to Central European Time (CET), also known as ‘single/double summer time’. This would mean that in summer, clocks would be set to Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) +2 hours and in winter to GMT+1 hour. The clocks would still go forward in spring and back in autumn, but there would be one extra hour of daylight in the evening, and one less in the morning.

Key facts: 

According to LighterLater, the campaign to introduce daylight saving, its introduction would:

  • Save 100 lives each year and prevent hundreds of serious injuries by making the roads safer;
  • Help make people healthier and tackle obesity by giving people more time to exercise and play sport outside in the evening;
  • Save the NHS around £138 million a year through reducing road casualties.
CTC View (formal statement of CTC's policy): 
  • CTC supports the idea of researching the effect of shifting time zones to align with many of our European neighbours. Such changes may bring considerable economic and environmental benefits and contribute to improved road safety.
  • In addition to the possible disadvantages of the shift for certain areas of the country and certain professions, there may be specific road safety effects on cyclists, such as the potential for greater exposure to icy conditions on winter mornings. These must be taken into account in the research.
  • CTC’s final view on daylight saving will be subject to the findings of official research.
Download full campaigns briefing: 
Publication Date: 
April 2014
Chris Peck's picture

The THINK! campaign for bikes is relaunched - CTC assesses its impact

Running in some of the cities that received money for cycling recently, the THINK! campaign follows the now usual 'give and take' message that equates cyclists and drivers as similar sources of danger, both of which need to 'play their part'. However, the messages it sends out are largely sensible.
The DfT's THINK! campaign

A new cycle safety awareness campaign has been launched by the Department for Transport.

The campaign is based on imagery produced by Transport for London, and focuses on urban issues such as junctions, parked car doors and Advanced Stop Lines. Suburban and rural issues - such as close overtaking - are not given the same prominence in the campaign.

Cherry Allan's picture

Cycle awareness campaigns for drivers

Sustained campaigns to improve road users' behaviour can be beneficial, if well-designed and targeted. To be effective, they need to convey positive, memorable and truthful messages...
What Matters Most campaign poster
Headline Messages: 
  • Sustained campaigns to improve road users’ behaviour can be beneficial, if well-designed and targeted. The Government has, for example, tackled drink-driving effectively over the years through an awareness campaign backed up by law enforcement.
  • To be effective, driver awareness campaigns need to convey positive, memorable and truthful messages, and avoid giving the misleading impression that problem behaviour from cyclists causes anything like as much harm as problem behaviour from drivers.

 

CTC View (formal statement of CTC's policy): 
  • Driver awareness campaigns relating to cycle safety should either convey positive messages about considerate and respectful road sharing by both groups, or, if aimed at addressing problem behaviours, they should deliver simple memorable messages to one group or the other, based on understanding why those behaviours occur.
  • Campaigns purporting to be even-handed by urging both drivers and cyclists not to engage in problem behaviours, create a false equivalence between the offences of the two groups. They are also poorly targeted in terms of actually influencing behaviour.
  • Tackling offending behaviour by cyclists is best done by engaging positively with the cycling community to mobilise peer pressure, e.g. through the cycling press or cycle trainers, rather than by ‘pandering to the gallery’ using simplistic negative stereotypes in public awareness campaigns.
Download full campaigns briefing: 
Publication Date: 
March 2014
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  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

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