Safe Drivers and Vehicles

RhiaWeston's picture

Road Justice petition handed to national policing lead for cycling

Road Justice campaigners and road crash victims handed over a petition calling for better roads policing this week to the national policing lead for cycling at the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO).

The petition, which has been signed by more than 12,000 people, is calling for the police to implement recommendations for better roads policing, which are outlined in a report produced for CTC’s Road Justice campaign.

The Road Justice campaign - sponsored by Slater & Gordon Lawyers - aims to get the criminal justice system to take a tougher approach to bad driving in order to make the roads safer for cyclists and pedestrians.

Chris Peck's picture

CTC urges MPs to demand action and funding to ‘Get Britain Cycling’

CTC, the national cycling charity, has urged MPs to demand leadership, commitment to quality cycling conditions, and funding of at least £10 per person annually, to ‘Get Britain Cycling’ when giving evidence at today’s Commons Transport Select Committee inquiry on cycle safety.
Gordon Seabright, Chris Boardman and Roger Geffen

The inquiry was called following a horrific spate of 6 cyclists’ deaths in London within 13 days last November.

After submitting written evidence (see below), CTC was called by the committee to present oral evidence alongside British Cycling's spokeman Chris Boardman and AA President Edmund King.

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Roger Geffen's picture

Now send us your 'irresponsible' walking-down-the-street adverts!

Although the ASA has provisionally withdrawn its ruling against Cycling Scotland's TV advert, the fight isn't over yet. Please send us videos showing how a ban on helmet-free cycling in TV ads would be like refusing to show people on the streets at night without reflective clothing.
How many TV adverts breach Highway Code rule 3?

Thank you everyone for all the wonderful adverts you have sent us, containing lots of examples of deeply 'irresponsible' cycling (e.g. without helmets) - notably the famous Hovis adverts of the 1970s! Thank you too for your equally impressive collection of (quite genuinely) irresponsible car ads.

Chris Peck's picture

London bans lorries without safety equipment

The Mayor of London and London Councils have agreed jointly to ban large vehicles from London's roads if they fail to meet high standards for cycle safety equipment. CTC welcomes this step forward, but says there are better longer-term solutions for cycle safety that should be investigated too.
All lorries will be forced to have sideguards and extra mirrors

The move was announced today by the Mayor of London and London Councils - the representative body for the 32 London Boroughs and the City of London.

By working together, the ban can be effectively enforced on every street in London.

This could come into effect as early as September. 

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Chris Peck's picture

Which car ads show breaches of the Highway Code?

The ASA ruling that outlaws cyclists not wearing helmets and riding outside 'secondary position' is a very hazy interpretation of the Highway Code and cycle training expertise. If you've got examples of car ads that show Highway Code infringements by drivers, let us know and we'll collect them here.
A car ad involving driving around with flares was accepted by the ASA

We've already collected many examples of adverts that show cycling to be normal and aspirational, yet would fall foul of the ASA's latest ruling.

To help further Cycling Scotland's appeal, we'd also like to point to the many adverts for cars that show flagrant breaches of the Highway Code.

So let's get started

Chris Peck's picture

Which ads are now banned? Your examples wanted

The ASA's bizarre ruling (under appeal by Cycling Scotland) that all cyclists must now be helmeted and cyclists must adopt dangerous road positioning has caused anger amongst the cycling community. If you've got examples of ads that would now be banned, please send them here.
Unhelmeted hipsters riding all over a promenade. Tsk tsk.

The ASA's ruling is being appealed by Cycling Scotland. To help support that appeal, we'd like examples of advertising - print and broadcast - that show cycling as a normal activity, and which would therefore (theoretically) not be allowed.

To start you off, here is CTC's own cinema advert, 'Cycle Hero', made a few years ago to communicate the issue of climate change and suggest cycling as an alternative.

Roger Geffen's picture

Advertising watchdog’s helmet ruling threatens the promotion of normal cycling

CTC, the national cycling charity, has voiced concern over a ruling by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) which could prevent future adverts from showing cyclists without helmets on TV.
The image that proved controversial to the ASA

In response to complaints against a TV advert produced by Cycling Scotland on behalf of the Scottish Government, the ASA ruled that all future television advertising featuring cyclists must only show cyclists wearing helmets. 

The ASA also ruled that the cyclist's position on the road in the advert was unsafe. CTC believes this is at odds with UK-wide national standards for cycle training, which CTC was instrumental in developing, and which are now backed by the UK and Scottish Governments.

Roger Geffen's picture

CTC calls on councils to fund cycle facilities through road maintenance programmes

22 January 2014
As the Government proposes a £50m fund for maintaining pedestrian and cycling routes, CTC calls for councils to maximise the synergies between their cycling programmes and their planned road maintenance budgets.
New York track built through maintenance work. Photo D Passmore (CC licence)

CTC has welcomed Government proposals to earmark £50m annually for maintaining walking and cycling facilities, out of the £976m distributed annually to councils for local road maintenance.

However, CTC believes even more cycle-friendly improvements could be made very cost-effectively if councils considered ways to deliver new or improved cycle provision whenever they are planning to resurface a road.

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RhiaWeston's picture

Road Justice campaign meets with Sentencing Council

CTC's Road Justice campaign, along with partners British Cycling and RoadPeace, met this week with the Sentencing Council to discuss the forthcoming review of sentencing guidelines for driving offences.
Victims rarely feel justice is done when a driver is sentenced

Drivers are being treated excessively leniently by the justice system, particularly at the point of sentencing, which demonstrates it is in need of a complete overhaul. 

The Government announced a review of the guidelines last year but has since postponed the review until the Ministry of Justice has revised current legislation concerning motoring offences.

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Chris Peck's picture

Goodwill reiterates footway cycling guidance

National media has become very excited about Cycling Minister Robert Goodwill's affirmation that police should not fine cyclists on the pavement if they are there through a fear of traffic. However, CTC believes that it is better to improve road conditions for cyclists and offer cycle training.
Police should use discretion when penalising cyclists on the pavement

Goodwill had mentioned in a letter his support for the principle that police should use their discretion when fining cyclists on the pavement. 

This reiterates guidance from Home Office ministers 15 years ago - when the fixed penalty notice for cycling on the pavement was created.

Although CTC believes that more enforcement of road traffic law is necessary to make conditions safer for cyclists and keep bad drivers off the streets, the risks posed by cyclists are often not proportionate to the level of enforcement that is targeted at cyclists.

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  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

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