Safe Drivers and Vehicles

20 mph: lower speeds, better streets

20 mph
Lower speeds lead to safer streets which are easier for cycling and walking. Reducing the speed limit to 20 mph is one of the simplest ways to reduce road casualties and make streets feel safer.
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Government to go ahead with longer lorries trial despite cyclists' objections

The Department for Transport is pressing ahead with a ten-year trial of longer lorries, despite acknowledging the potential danger to vulnerable road users and the impact on road infrastructure. During its first year, the trial could see 1,800 of the larger vehicles on the roads of the UK.
25m long lorry in Sweden (proposed British ones are shorter than this!)

CTC campaigned against the proposed trial, with more than 1,300 cyclists writing to their MPs to object to the plans. As a consequence the trial is smaller than it might have been, but will still increase the risks to all road users.

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Has the Minister misled Parliament over longer lorries?

Mike Penning MP, the Road Safety Minister, suggested to Parliament that the risks to cyclists from longer lorries had been assessed. There is no evidence from any published document that it has.
25m long lorry in Sweden (proposed British ones are shorter than this!)

Questioned about the longer lorries trial in the House of Commons in September 2011, road safety Minister Mike Penning MP claimed that:

"We considered carefully whether longer semi-trailers posed a risk to cyclists in particular, and the risk is not there."

A subsequent written question (the reply to which was drafted by officials) established that no such 'careful consideration' took place.

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CTC gives evidence to Select Committee inquiry into road safety

The House of Commons Transport Select Committee scrutinises the Department for Transport's spending and policy decisions. Following the launch of a new policy on road safety the Select Committee chose that topic to investigate.
CTC gives evidence to Select Committee inquiry into road safety

The Transport Select Committee's Inquiry was conducted in early 2012, taking oral evidence from a range of transport and road safety organisations, including CTC.

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On your head be it? Bicycle helmets and recent legal cases.

Many cyclists were seriously concerned when a High Court Judge recently remarked that un-helmeted cyclists who suffer head injuries may not be entitled to full compensation if it can be shown that a helmet would have reduced or prevented their injuries.

After all, it is not compulsory to wear a helmet whilst cycling and there is no clear or conclusive evidence to support the view that compulsory wearing would either advance the cause of cycling, or necessarily improve cyclists’ safety on the road.

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Cycle helmets: the evidence

Cycle helmets: the evidence
CTC wants to keep helmets an optional choice. Forcing - or strongly encouraging - people to wear helmets deters people from cycling and undermines the public health benefits of cycling. This campaign seeks to educate policy makers and block misguided attempts at legislation.
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Will the transport secretary turn the cycling debate into action?

23 February 2012
After a hugely positive debate on cycling in the House of Commons, CTC has called on Transport Secretary Justine Greening MP to support an action plan for ‘more and safer cycling’.
The debating chamber of Westminster Hall was packed for the debate on cycling

CTC has called on Transport Secretary Justine Greening MP to support an action plan for ‘more and safer cycling’, following a hugely positive debate on cycling in the House of Commons this afternoon. CTC also echoed calls from MPs for the restoration of Cycling England in order to co-ordinate delivery of this plan.

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'Cities fit for cycling' - a bit of a backlash?

The Times' campaign to improve safety was widely welcomed and many have come out in support, but criticism of the aims and execution was inevitable. CTC's main concern is that the campaign doesn't acknowledge the health benefits of cycling.
Cities fit for cycling logo

Most non-cyclists when asked why they don't cycle will probably list one of the main reasons as 'it's too dangerous!' This perception of danger often rests on poor understanding of the actual risks - usually most non-cyclists only view of cycling is through their windscreen as they nervously try to overtake a vulnerable looking cyclist at the side of the road. However, some of those concerns are justified: you may be less likely to die in a mile cycling than a mile walking, but you are even less likely to be killed while driving.

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Cities fit for cycling

The Times has launched a campaign to improve cycle safety following the serious injury to a reporter on the paper. An 8 point manifesto has been published, with the focus on lorries, junctions, cycle infrastructure and 20 mph as the default urban speed limit.
Cities fit for cycling

In November last year Mary Bowers, a journalist at The Times, was crushed by a lorry while cycling to work in east London. She remains in hospital unconscious 3 months on.

In response to this horrific event her colleagues on the paper have now launched a major campaign to increase safety for cyclists in Britain. In doing so they have taken advice from CTC and other organisations and come up with an 8 point plan of action.

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Cycle casualty numbers not reducing fast enough

CTC, the national cycling charity, is concerned that the annual number of cyclist casualties does not appear to be reducing, even though the number of cycling trips remains similar to the levels seen during 2009.
Safety in Numbers

In part, the severe winter months of January, February, November and December may have contributed to there being only a small increase in cycling overall, while motor vehicle traffic fell substantially.

Contact Information: 

CTC Press Office
Email: publicity@ctc.org.uk
Telephone: 0844-736-8453

Notes to Editors: 

CTC, the national cycling charity with 67,000 members, is the oldest and largest cycling body in the UK, established in 1878. CTC provides a comprehensive range of services, advice, events and protection for its members and works to promote cycling by raising public and political awareness of cycling's health, social and environmental benefits. Visit www.ctc.org.uk.

The risk of cycling is based on the number of road deaths (111 in 2010) per mile cycled (5 billion kms in 2010). Similar data for 1990-2010 (reproduced from Department for Transport data) can be found in the table below.

Road traffic data published today: http://www2.dft.gov.uk/pgr/statistics/datatablespublications/roads/traff...

Road casualty data published today: http://www2.dft.gov.uk/pgr/statistics/datatablespublications/accidents/r...

Cycle use grew just 0.5% in 2010 but remains higher than at any time since 1991. Motor traffic fell by 8.1 billion kms (-1.6%) and has been attributed to the severe winter weather at the start and end of 2010.

Transport for London’s casualty figures can be found here: www.lscp.org.uk/lrsu/www/downloads/publications/casualties_in_greater_lo...

Latest data on cycle usage in London can be found on p. 16 of the Commissioner’s Report to the Transport for London Board meeting held this week: www.tfl.gov.uk/assets/downloads/corporate/Item04-Board-29-June-2011-Comm...

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  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

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