Safe Drivers and Vehicles

Roger Geffen's picture

The RAC says “Drivers need help” – and they’re right!

The RAC has just published a survey of motorists’ views, and it makes for interesting reading.
83% of drivers admit speeding regularly, yet 92% say they are law-abiding

Their 2012 report on motoring includes some pretty candid admissions from drivers:

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Victoria Hazael's picture

CTC member gets compensation after being hit by a bus

A CTC member from Ealing has received a six figure out-of-court settlement from Transdev London after a double decker bus knocked him off his bike and ran over his leg, resulting in it being amputated below the knee.
Cyclists in a bus lane in London

The incident, which took place in February 2010, occurred when the bus was attempting to overtake Nick Black as he cycled  towards a roundabout along Relay Road near the Westfield Shopping Centre in Shepherd’s Bush.

Although the bus driver initially denied liability, CCTV footage proved that the bus was being driven too closely to Nick, as well as overtaking him on his left-hand side. This caused Nick to lose balance, fall into the bus’s path, and resulted in its rear wheel running over his leg.

Contact Information: 

CTC Press Office
Email: publicity@ctc.org.uk
Telephone: 0844-736-8453

RJW Press Office
Email:rjw@lucre.co.uk
Telephone: Katie-Jo Flynn or Lissy Scarlett: 0208 332 9690

 

Notes to Editors: 

This press release was issued by RJW

Russell Jones & Walker, part of Slater & Gordon Lawyers employs over 440 staff (over 229 lawyers) and is renowned as the leading national firm of solicitors in protecting the rights and legal interest of individuals and those who represent them.  RJW has a network of regional offices and includes those in the following centres: London, Birmingham, Bristol, Wakefield, Manchester, Newcastle, Sheffield, Cardiff and Edinburgh. 

http://www.rjw.co.uk

CTC, the national cycling charity, inspires and helps people to cycle and keep cycling, whatever kind of cycling they do or would like to do. Over a century’s experience tells us that cycling is more than useful transport; it makes you feel good, gives you a sense of freedom and creates a better environment for everyone.

  • CTC provide expert, practical help and advice.
  • CTC support individuals and communities.
  • CTC protect cyclists’ interests.
  • CTC campaign to make cycling mainstream and to remove the things that stop people cycling.
  • CTC help people develop the confidence and skills to cycle.
  • CTC promote the benefits of cycling to individuals, to society and to the economy.
  • www.ctc.org.uk

Every CTC member is automatically covered by £10 million third party insurance, which will cover costs if a claim is made against them following an accident.  CTC members are also entitled to free legal advice through RJW if they suffer an injury as a result of someone else’s negligence. RJW operate a legal advice line, which is open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. If the value of the personal injury is more than £1000 CTC will cover all court costs irrespective of the outcome the case and will pay for reports, expert witnesses or transport consultants if needed.  CTC members also always get to keep 100% of compensation and have support of CTC throughout their case.

Therese Bjorn's picture

IAM red light jumping stats for cyclists misleading says CTC

A ‘survey’ by IAM, as reported by BikeBiz and The Guardian’s Bike Blog, suggests that ‘57% of cyclists admit to jumping red lights’.
IAM red light jumping stats for cyclists misleading says CTC

On closer inspection the figures, which came from a self-reported internet poll, reveal that only 2% of respondents said they jump lights ‘frequently’, while 42% say that they jump lights ‘once or twice’ or ‘rarely’ and another 44% say they never have.

Contact Information: 

CTC Press Office
Email: publicity@ctc.org.uk
Telephone: 0844-736-8453

Notes to Editors: 
  • CTC, the UK’s largest cycling charity, inspires and helps people to cycle and keep cycling, whatever kind of cycling they do or would like to do. Over a century’s experience tells us that cycling is more than useful transport; it makes you feel good, gives you a sense of freedom and creates a better environment for everyone.

  • Survey by Brake found 48% of respondents admitted to talking on their phones while driving. 65% of that group used hand-held mobile phones, which is illegal. Even using a hands-free mobile is deemed to result in up to 30% increased reaction time when compared to the legal alcohol limit.

  • Data obtained from Transport for London by CTC revealed that from 1998-2007 an average of 5 pedestrians were injured per year after a cyclist had jumped a red light, whereas 14 were injured by red light jumping motorcyclists, 78 by red light jumping car drivers and 13 in collisions with taxis, buses or other vehicles. In addition, 5% of cyclists killed and seriously injured in London in 3 of the most recent years occurred after the cyclist had disobeyed a red traffic light or give way marking; 15% of cyclists were killed or seriously injured when another vehicle disobeyed a red traffic light or give way marking.

Chris Peck's picture

IAM feeds the tabloids with spurious claims of red light jumping cyclists

Both the Guardian and BikeBiz have broken an embargoed press release from the Institute of Advanced Motorists claiming that the majority of cyclists jump red lights.
Occupying an advanced stop line is also technically 'jumping a red light'

"57% of cyclists jump red lights" screamed the headline on the press release from the IAM.

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Chris Peck's picture

London cab firm boycotted by cyclists

16 April 2012
The owner of Addison Lee - a minicab company that operates in central London - has got into hot water with cyclists after a series of belligerent statements about cyclists and bus lanes.
John Griffin of Addison Lee

It started in early April when John Griffin, head of Addison Lee, writing to his 3,500 drivers, suggested they have a right to use London's bus lanes and offered to pay any fines they might consequentially incur. That move - which comes on top of Transport for London's (TfL) decision to formalise motorcycle access to bus lanes - triggered howls of anger from cyclists.

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Chris Peck's picture

Alcohol and the law - which road users are worst?

Drunken cycling is an offence and a very bad idea. But is it much of a road safety problem? Police enforce some traffic laws, but seldom drunk cycling. CTC examined data for 5 years to see how many fatalities involve alcohol and cycling in this country.
A police officer carries out roadside checks but probably not on cyclists

For some months I've had an irregular correspondence with a Polish cycle campaigner who relates that the police treat drunk cycling under the same laws as they treat drunk driving.

In Poland - as with most of the rest of Europe - the legal blood alcohol limit is far lower than in the UK: you can be fined at over 20 mg/100ml of blood and jailed at 50. In the UK the limit is still 80, despite a recent report recommending reduction to 50.

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Chris Peck's picture

Sorry mate, I didn't see you...recording near misses while cycling

CTC's Stop SMIDSY campaign is gathering examples of where and when crashes occur between road users and will document the reactions of the criminal justice system, ranging from the police to prosecutors and the courts. But there are hundreds of 'near misses' that occur for each actual crash.
Stop SMIDSY

There's one junction that I must use regularly that I find really scary. It's a roundabout above a major trunk road. Motor vehicles come off the trunk road at 70 mph but the design of the roundabout means that they only need to slow down to around 45 mph if they want to enter the roundabout and leave at the first exit.

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Cycle Swap - cab and bus drivers get lessons in cycling in Reading

Inspired by the phrase 'putting the shoe on the other foot', CTC Cycling Devleopment Officer Javed Saddique is planning to deliver cycle training to professional drivers in Reading in an effort to get them to understand how road conditions affect cyclists.

Cycle Swap will start with an awareness exercise involving cab and bus drivers in Reading. Participants will be given cycling awareness skills throughout the morning and in the afternoon they will be provided with helmet cameras to document how they navigate through the varied conditions in Reading.  This exercise will raise awareness and help build a better relationship between road users and cyclists. 

Chris Peck's picture

Who's to blame in crashes between cyclists and motorists?

Columnists in the tabloids - and sometimes the quality press as well - often blame cyclists for crashes with motor vehicles. Figures obtained from the Department for Transport reveal that cyclists - especially adults - generally aren't to blame and, in fact, more often the driver is.
A graph showing who is to blame - cyclist or driver?

At CTC we're constantly being asked to go on TV or radio to be the punch bag for someone's anti-cycling rant.

One of the recurring issues in amongst the you-don't-pay-road-tax type drivel is the suggestion that cyclists are themselves to blame for crashes. Happily, we now have some data which we can use to refute such wild speculation.

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Cherry Allan's picture

Level crossings

When it comes to level crossings, cyclists need to be assured of at least two things: that they will get across safely; that convenient crossing points are kept open or created.
Level crossing

Safety

Incidents at level crossings have a particularly serious impact on the operation of UK railways.

Whilst the number of signals passed at danger, trains derailed and workers injured have all been going down, level crossings - the only place where the closely controlled movements of trains meets the random and less regulated activity of other transport modes – are still the main, high risk locations. Indeed, there has been no effective solution to cutting the 'crash rate’ amongst road users, who have, unfortunately, included cyclists.

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  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

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