Safe Drivers and Vehicles

Chris Peck's picture

Crown Prosecution needs to treat dangerous driving as dangerous

CTC has responded to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) guidance on prosecuting bad driving, calling for a more rigorous interpretation of the law as it stands - namely, that dangerous driving should be charged as such, not downgraded to careless driving.
Charges for motoring offences involving death have changed substantially

When you hear of a case of bad driving where you feel the driver has been 'let off' without significant punishment, it's pretty likely that the reason is in part because the CPS has chosen an offence which only carries a minor penalty.

Where death has resulted, the CPS has a range of offences it can choose from, from murder or gross negligence manslaughter to causing death by dangerous or careless driving. How it decides on which offence to choose depends on the circumstances - essentially the culpability of the driver.

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Chris Peck's picture

Wiggins hospitalised in crash with van

7 November 2012
Bradley Wiggins has broken ribs and suffered other, non-serious injuries, in a crash with a van in Wrightington, Lancashire, whilst out on a training ride. The driver offered the usual 'Sorry, mate I didn't see you,' excuse, as she hit Wiggins while exiting a petrol station.
Bradley Wiggins was injured in a crash with a van

The crash occurred on the A5209, Crow Orchard Road, very close to the junction with the M6, at around 6pm. This section of road carried over 12,000 motor vehicles a day in 2011, including 1,600 vans, but just a handful of cyclists.

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Chris Peck's picture

Which police force has seen the biggest drop in traffic policing?

Despite overall policing levels remaining constant, traffic police numbers fell by 29% over the last ten years. Using the Freedom of Information Act, CTC can reveal the force by force data, showing which policing area has seen the biggest decrease in traffic policing.
London maintains a squad of traffic police who use bikes

Last month CTC revealed data on traffic police levels in England and Wales requested on our behalf by Dr Julian Huppert MP, the joint chair of the All Party Cycling Group.

Now those national figures can be supplemented by local data, showing where the decline in road traffic policing has been greatest. 

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Chris Peck's picture

Government's response to Select Committee branded 'feeble' by CTC

CTC is urging Ministers to show much stronger leadership on encouraging more and safer cycling, after a lamentably weak response to the Commons Transport Select Committee’s inquiry earlier this year on road safety.
The Government's response to the Select Committee inquiry

CTC’s President Jon Snow was one of the witnesses at the inquiry in April this year, along with Times editor James Harding, and CTC’s Vice-President Josie Dew. He used the occasion to make a strong call for leadership on cycling and cycle safety, stressing that “Leadership means joined up Government with all departments working together to further cycling.”

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Chris Peck's picture

Call for justice review comes just as Crown Prosecution Guidance consults

This week British Cycling increased pressure on the Government to review the way criminal justice treats road crash victims, securing an agreement to meet and discuss the issue. Meanwhile the Crown Prosecution Service are consulting on their guidance for prosecuting bad driving.
Old Bailey

British Cycling have stepped up their campaign for a review of traffic justice, following high profile cases of injustice earlier this year. CTC joined in the campaign urging MPs to sign up to an Early Day Motion (EDM) demanding a review of road traffic justice.

Chris Peck's picture

From the archive - The Times, 1st August 1934

In 1934 the Times published a statement from the Cyclists' Touring Club on road safety. Many of the issues raised still resonate - while in other areas the suggestions appear ludicrous in the modern day.
The Times carried CTC's views on road safety

Things weren't going well in the 1930s. As cars became more powerful, and the interests of the motorist began to become entwined with the establishment, legislators decided to abandon the 20 mph speed limit. 

For four years, carnage reigned - the rate of injury and death climbed, with cyclists making up almost a quarter of road deaths - an astonishing 1,324 deaths out of 5,862 in total in 1933 and 1,400 out of 6,502 by 1935.

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Chris Peck's picture

'Ban bikes from A-roads' suggests judge

Staffordshire Crown Court Resident Judge Simon Tonking has stirred up controversy by writing to The Times arguing that cyclists be banned from dualled roads. His comments are repugnant in part because he presided over the case of Pat Kenny, whose killer was given a community sentence in April 2012.
The junction on the A38 where Pat Kenny was killed in January 2011

Carlton Reid has drawn attention to the letter, pointing out that while cyclists may prefer not to use high speed trunk roads, banning them entirely would be a drastic step.

Meanwhile Martin Porter QC - the Cycling Lawyer - has written a response to Tonking that elegantly demolishes his argument. 

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Roger Geffen's picture

Notes from the LibDem conference fringe

Earlier this week I spoke at two fringe events at the LibDem conference. The first was also addressed by Julian Huppert MP, co-chair of the All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group, the second by cycling minister Norman Baker. Both set out their stall as highly impressive advocates for cycling.
LibDem logo

The first meeting was hosted by the Freight Transport Association (FTA) together with the Times newspaper and chaired by their transport correspondent Philip Pank, one of the journalists behind the paper's inspirational Cities fit for cycling campaign.

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Chris Peck's picture

Detailed 2011 casualty figures reveal areas for concern

The detailed data for the 2011 casualty figures have been published by the Department for Transport, revealing where the worrying rise in casualties - first announced earlier in the year - is happening, and to whom.
Who is getting injured, and how?

Earlier in the year headline figures showed that cycling serious injuries were up by 16% in one year, yet cycling levels remained broadly similar to the year before.

At the time CTC's analysis suggested that some of the cycle use that had been suppressed the previous year (by cold weather) may lie behind the huge increase in cycle casualties.

Now the more detailed data on where, when, to whom and with whom crashes occurred, has been published.

So what else do these new figures tell us?

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Chris Peck's picture

Government THINK! cycling campaign misses the bigger picture

20 September 2012
A new government advertising campaign on cycle safety has been launched, although with just £80,000 behind it, it's unlikely to have any discernable effect on driver behaviour. Worse still, the campaign includes some poor advice to drivers on overtaking.
The cycling safety campaign emphasises similarities between cyclists and drivers

The campaign's main image shows twins, one of whom has a bike, the other a car. The message "drivers and cyclists are more alike than you think" aims to break down the feelings of animosity and is backed up by the figures which show that cyclists are just as likely to be car drivers than non-cyclists.

The message that road users should look out for one another is sensible, and welcome, but misses the point that the vast majority of cyclist injuries in crashes with cars are blamed by police on drivers, not cyclists.

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  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

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