Safe Drivers and Vehicles

Chris Peck's picture

Spanish traffic authority proposes compulsory helmets and other anti-cycling measures

The national traffic authority for Spain has revealed a highly alarming range of proposals that seem designed to get cyclists off the roads. The following is a translation from Spanish campaign group ConBici's account.
Hire bikes - without helmets - have become very popular in Spain

This article originally appeared on the website of ConBici in Spanish and

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Chris Peck's picture

Taxis in Belfast bus lanes will endanger cyclists, say campaigners

21 February 2013
CTC's Tom McClelland and Barry Flood joined other cycle campaigners in protesting against allowing taxis into bus lanes in Belfast.
Protesters gathered to object to allowing more taxis into bus lanes

Although not perfect, bus lanes provide priority and a lower-traffic environment for cyclists, but changes to the way taxis are licenced in Northern Ireland could mean many more vehicles using the routes.

Up to 2,000 more vehicles could use the routes if ministers approve the changes. This is a cause of concern for many people -  86% of respondents to the consultation held last year, opposed the plans.

Tom McClelland and Barry Flood, CTC representatives in Northern Ireland, joined protesters campaigning against the move. 

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RhiaWeston's picture

Police and Crime Commissioners should prioritise road safety

Join CTC in writing to your Police and Crime Commissioner asking them to prioritise road safety.
Write to your PCC asking them to prioritise road safety

The 29% drop in road traffic policing levels over the past decade suggests that road safety is being neglected by the police. Possibly connected to this is a fall in convictions for serious and slight motoring offences, which have dropped faster than the decline in road casualties.

This means bad driving is going unpunished or that many bad drivers are being issued with lenient sentences that do not reflect the severity of the offence.

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Roger Geffen's picture

No to higher lorry speeds

CTC has voiced its opposition to Government proposals to raise the speed limit for goods vehicles on rural single-carriageway roads, saying this would worsen cycle safety on rural lanes.
HGV on a narrow rural lane

The Government is proposing to increase the speed limit for lorries on rural single-carriageways to either 45 mph or 50 mph. The national speed limit for cars on these roads is 60 mph, but with a 40 mph limit for lorries.

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RhiaWeston's picture

How to contact the police if you live in London, Scotland or Northern Ireland

If you have been redirected to this page it means you cannot email a PCC as there is no PCC where you live. If you do not live in London, Scotland or Northern Ireland please return to the form and check your postcode is correct.
Road policing

London - Mayor Boris Johnson is the equivalent of a Police and Crime Commissioner for London. To ask him to prioritise road safety email him at mayor@london.gov.uk or tweet him @MayorofLondon

Scotland - Policing in Scotland is a devolved matter, with a different procedure and no Police and Crime Commissioner. However, there is now a single force, Police Scotland. Contact your MSP to ask for a greater priority to be given to roads policing. A separate report into Road Justice in Scotland will be published in 2014.

Chris Peck's picture

Second 'Get Britain Cycling' inquiry session deals with cycle safety

30 January 2013
After discussing the strategy for cycling in the first week, the second session of the Parliamentary 'Get Britain Cycling' inquiry, on the 30th January, was a more detailed examination of cycle safety issues.
20 mph is one of the easiest ways to improve safety for all road users

The inquiry panel wanted to hear evidence on how to tackle the actual and perceived cycle safety concerns which deter people from cycling.

Much of the session was taken up with discussion of issue of traffic law enforcement and the legal system's often inadequate response to road crashes.

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Roger Geffen's picture

Crushing a cyclist with a lorry while on a mobile - is that really "careless" driving?

After a week in which we learnt of two disturbing acquittals for alleged driving offences, Roger Geffen reflects on a meeting with Justice Minister Helen Grant MP, and looks forward hopefully to action to address the legal system's compacent response to bad driving in 2013.
The Ministry of Justice

A couple of days ago, my colleague Rhia Weston responded to the two disturbing court verdicts announced last Friday (14th December 2012).

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Roger Geffen's picture

Minister backs talks to improve traffic justice

CTC has welcomed a commitment from Helen Grant MP, the Minister for Courts and Victims, to support discussions on how to improve the legal system's response to road traffic offences.
Old Bailey - Scales of Justice

CTC's Campaigns & Policy Director Roger Geffen met Helen Grant, together with representatives of British Cycling and road crash victims charity RoadPeace, at the Ministry of Justice this morning. 

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RhiaWeston's picture

Lenient sentencing is just the tip of the iceberg

As the Mary Bowers’ case demonstrates careless driving charges and small fines do not reflect the severity of crimes committed by bad drivers. Sentences, therefore, need to be harsher, but we must also be aware of the large number of collisions that do not even make it to court in the first place.
Stop SMIDSY campaign

The lorry driver who hit Mary Bowers in November last year as she waited at a traffic light in an advanced stop box was sentenced last Friday (14/12/12) to an eight month driving ban and a £2,700 fine. This sentence has been termed ‘insulting’ by Mary’s father, who would have preferred to see the driver convicted of dangerous rather than careless driving offence, correctly reflecting the danger of his actions.

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RhiaWeston's picture

Lorry driver in Mary Bowers case receives ‘insulting’ £2,700 fine for careless driving

Lorry driver Petre Beiu, a Romanian national, was acquitted of the dangerous driving charge he received after hitting Mary Bowers as she commuted to work in November 2011. He was found guilty of the lesser charge of careless driving, for which he received a £2,700 fine and an 8 month driving ban.
Launch of The Times Cities fit for Cycling campaign

According to the London Evening Standard on hearing the sentence Mary Bowers’ father stated "I regard the sentence as a complete insult…inconceivable that a verdict other than dangerous driving was reached."

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