Promotion and Encouragement

A statistical look at the success of Swindon's Workplace Cycle Challenge

Find out what effect the second Workplace Cycle Challenge had on the number of people cycling in Swindon.
CTC and Challenge for Change logo

What is a Workplace Cycle Challenge?

The Workplace Cycle Challenge is a behavioural change programme, designed to encourage more people to cycle more often.

It allowed organisations, and the individual departments within them, to compete against each other, seeing who could encourage the most staff to cycle for at least 10 minutes over a three-week Challenge period.

The Challenge focuses on participation rather than mileage, to ensure a fair competition which engaged new and occasional cyclists as much as regular cyclists.

Cherry Allan's picture

Ten common questions about cycling

Have you ever been put on the spot by someone who's not very sympathetic to cycling?
  • Do they tell you that cycling’s far too dangerous to contemplate, and they can’t believe that more cyclists don’t wear helmets and hi-viz?
  • Do they accuse cyclists of causing havoc, riding on pavements, upsetting pedestrians and jumping red lights?
  • Do they say cyclists should stop slowing down traffic and remove themselves and their machines from the road, forthwith?
Chris Peck's picture

Posties tell their stories about delivering by bike

As part of CTC's campaign to keep posties cycling, we've been collecting the stories from postmen and women about their experiences and why they want to keep their bikes.
Cartoon by David de Berker - Keep our Posties cycling

If you are a postie who uses a cycle for your deliveries, please share your experiences to help CTC better argue for keeping cycle deliveries.  Get in touch by sending us an email, or making a comment below.


A plea from a village postie in Eastern England:

Cherry Allan's picture

Cycling to Work Resource (2003)

In 2003, the Department for Transport funded the production of an informative, online resource on cycling to work. It was based on the findings of CTC's Benchmarking programme, which identified a number of local authority initiatives that were setting the 'benchmark' in this field.
Cycle commuter

The Cycling to Work resource, which is now available (largely unrevised) as a document, includes:

Cherry Allan's picture

Bicycle User Groups (BUGs)

If you want to encourage more people to commute by cycle to your workplace, or use cycles for business travel, setting up a Bicycle User Group is a step in the right direction. This guide tells you how to go about it, and what the BUG can do once it gets going.

Workplace BUGs support staff who cycle at and/or to and from work. They are usually championed by a keen cyclist plus (ideally) a core of fellow employees. Some BUGs have much in common with local cycle campaign groups and many not only look after the interests of existing cyclists, but work hard to encourage other employees to take up cycling too.

Cherry Allan's picture

Becoming a cycle-friendly employer

Becoming a cycle-friendly employer makes sense. Encouraging cycling helps tackle the business costs of congestion, reduces an organisation's impact on the local and wider environment and even attracts some tax incentives. What's more, it's likely that levels of absenteeism will drop.
Commuter

Many UK towns and cities have a traffic problem - too many cars, poor air quality, congested streets and limited car-parking spaces. This is particularly bad during rush hours, with mass migration of people to and from their workplaces.

Julie Rand's picture

Cycle trains - a good way to encourage people to commute by bike

Cyclists in Stirlingshire, Scotland have formed a bike train from Dunblane station to Stirling University as a way of encouraging more people to use sustainable transport and reduce the number of car journeys.
Commuting cyclists in a group

CTC has long campaigned on the 'Safety in Numbers' effect which says that cycling gets safer, the more people do it.

Now campaigners in Sterlingshire have taken this literally with the formation of a bike train to encourage commuters to use the bike and train combination, rather than taking the car to work.

This BBC report explains the whys and wherefores of it. Maybe this is an idea that could spread to other towns and cities across the UK?

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Cherry Allan's picture

Tax incentives

Cycle commuting is a convenient way for people to fit exercise into the daily routine, and work-related travel by cycle helps ease congestion and is good for the economy and the environment. To help, the Government has introduced a range of cycle-friendly tax incentives for employers and employees.
A cycle commuter on his way to work

Cycle mileage

Employees who use their own cycle for work (i.e. not to and from work) are entitled to 20p per mile, tax-free.

If an employer pays less than this, or no cycle mileage rate at all (which is not a good thing, of course!), an employee can still claim tax relief by contacting HMRC (Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs) directly.

For more, see HMRC’s guidance for employees who use their own vehicles for work

Andy Hawes's picture

Streets Ahead - CTC's Cycle Commuting Guide

Cycling to work serves many purposes, it's good for your health, the environment and you'll be guarenteed to arrive at work, college or school at the same time, every time! Read accounts of regular cycle commuters and gain valuable information to ease you into the world of cycle commuting!

Cycle travel is reliable and satisfying. It gets you exactly where you want to go with the minimum of stress and complication and the added bonus of a little gentle exercise.

While others head for the gym, you can have your cake and eat it: moderate cycling burns 300 calories an hour – so a half-hour each way commute earns you a guilt-free slice of gateaux.

Chris Peck's picture

London town centres: cyclists and pedestrians are more important than car users

Research conducted by Transport for London has revealed that although cyclists and pedestrians spend less per visit than car users, they visit more often and therefore tend to spend more per week.
Cycle parking inside a shopping centre in the Netherlands

The research, conducted in a handful of London's town centre areas found that per visit cyclists spent on average £21, less than car (£41), walk (£26) bus (£32) or tube/train (£38).

However, because cyclists and pedestrians visit their town centres much more often than car users, the per week figures that different mode users spent are:

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