Promotion and Encouragement

Cherry Allan's picture

Bicycle User Groups (BUGs)

If you want to encourage more people to commute by cycle to your workplace, or use cycles for business travel, setting up a Bicycle User Group is a step in the right direction. This guide tells you how to go about it, and what the BUG can do once it gets going.

Workplace BUGs support staff who cycle at and/or to and from work. They are usually championed by a keen cyclist plus (ideally) a core of fellow employees. Some BUGs have much in common with local cycle campaign groups and many not only look after the interests of existing cyclists, but work hard to encourage other employees to take up cycling too.

Cherry Allan's picture

Becoming a cycle-friendly employer

Becoming a cycle-friendly employer makes sense. Encouraging cycling helps tackle the business costs of congestion, reduces an organisation's impact on the local and wider environment and even attracts some tax incentives. What's more, it's likely that levels of absenteeism will drop.
Commuter

Many UK towns and cities have a traffic problem - too many cars, poor air quality, congested streets and limited car-parking spaces. This is particularly bad during rush hours, with mass migration of people to and from their workplaces.

Julie Rand's picture

Cycle trains - a good way to encourage people to commute by bike

Cyclists in Stirlingshire, Scotland have formed a bike train from Dunblane station to Stirling University as a way of encouraging more people to use sustainable transport and reduce the number of car journeys.
Commuting cyclists in a group

CTC has long campaigned on the 'Safety in Numbers' effect which says that cycling gets safer, the more people do it.

Now campaigners in Sterlingshire have taken this literally with the formation of a bike train to encourage commuters to use the bike and train combination, rather than taking the car to work.

This BBC report explains the whys and wherefores of it. Maybe this is an idea that could spread to other towns and cities across the UK?

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Cherry Allan's picture

Tax incentives

Cycle commuting is a convenient way for people to fit exercise into the daily routine, and work-related travel by cycle helps ease congestion and is good for the economy and the environment. To help, the Government has introduced a range of cycle-friendly tax incentives for employers and employees.
A cycle commuter on his way to work

Cycle mileage

Employees who use their own cycle for work (i.e. not to and from work) are entitled to 20p per mile, tax-free.

If an employer pays less than this, or no cycle mileage rate at all (which is not a good thing, of course!), an employee can still claim tax relief by contacting HMRC (Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs) directly.

For more, see HMRC’s guidance for employees who use their own vehicles for work

Andy Hawes's picture

Streets Ahead - CTC's Cycle Commuting Guide

Cycling to work serves many purposes, it's good for your health, the environment and you'll be guarenteed to arrive at work, college or school at the same time, every time! Read accounts of regular cycle commuters and gain valuable information to ease you into the world of cycle commuting!
CTC cycle commuting guide

Cycle travel is reliable and satisfying. It gets you exactly where you want to go with the minimum of stress and complication and the added bonus of a little gentle exercise.

While others head for the gym, you can have your cake and eat it: moderate cycling burns 300 calories an hour – so a half-hour each way commute earns you a guilt-free slice of gateaux.

Chris Peck's picture

London town centres: cyclists and pedestrians are more important than car users

Research conducted by Transport for London has revealed that although cyclists and pedestrians spend less per visit than car users, they visit more often and therefore tend to spend more per week.
Cycle parking inside a shopping centre in the Netherlands

The research, conducted in a handful of London's town centre areas found that per visit cyclists spent on average £21, less than car (£41), walk (£26) bus (£32) or tube/train (£38).

However, because cyclists and pedestrians visit their town centres much more often than car users, the per week figures that different mode users spent are:

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Cherry Allan's picture

Smarter choices

Smarter choices - measures, including cycling, that help people find alternatives to driving - can make a huge difference to travel habits...
Cyclist on path
Headline Messages: 
  • Measures that provide encouragement, incentives and opportunities to try out alternatives to the private car are known as ‘smarter choices’. 
  • Smarter choices to encourage cycling must go hand-in-hand with improving cycling conditions on the highway. If anything, however, smarter choices are more cost-effective in terms of congestion, yielding on average £10 of benefits to every £1 spent.
  • Smarter choice measures include: elements of travel plans, advertising and promotional campaigns, cycle maps, marketing directly to individuals, tax incentives, cycle training, rides, events and activities for specific groups in society.
CTC View (formal statement of CTC's policy): 
  • Smarter choice measures are:
    • a proven way of reducing car use and carbon emissions
    • an effective means of encouraging people to take up cycling, or to cycle more often
    • a good investment, offering an excellent return 
  • Investing in ‘smarter choices’ is at least as important as investing in physical improvements to the highway network. 
  • Both national and local authorities should dedicate sufficient resources to smarter choices, recognising that they rely on revenue rather than capital funding.
Download full campaigns briefing: 
Publication Date: 
October 2010
Anonymous's picture

Bike Club Scotland celebrates its first birthday

Scotland’s young people will have the opportunity to meet the country’s decision makers on education, public health, road safety and community learning and development on Tuesday, when these groups come together to celebrate the first year of the cycling development programme Bike Club.
Liberton High School Bike Club in Edinburgh

The day will involve several lively presentations from Bike Club leaders who will discuss their projects and the difference cycling has made to young people's lives.

Contact Information: 

For more information or an interview, contact Suzanne Forup:
Tel: 0131 554 2561
Email: suzanne.forup@youthscotland.org.uk

Notes to Editors: 

Bike Club is a national programme that inspires young people to become participants and leaders of fun, creative and inclusive cycling-related activities. It recognises that cycling can improve the lives of young people by increasing physical activity levels, improving health and wellbeing, encouraging learning and building social inclusion. This is reflected in the diversity of the cycling projects it has helped establish in Scotland. They include young people from families with low incomes, BME groups, young people with disabilities, girls only projects and young people not in employment or education. It is led by a consortium of established charities including Youth Scotland, UK Youth, ContinYou and CTC – the national cycling charity. Further information about Bike Club can be found at http://bikeclub.org.uk

CTC is the national cycling charity, with over 130 years’ expertise in supporting cyclists and promoting cycling. CTC has pioneered projects that bring the benefits of cycling to hard-to-reach groups within the community.
http://www.ctc.org.uk

Youth Scotland is the network of youth clubs and groups across Scotland. It is the largest non-uniformed youth organisation in Scotland and delivers quality youth work programmes, information, resources, training and support to community based youth work across Scotland. http://www.youthscotland.org.uk

UK Youth is a national charity developing and promoting high quality youth work and educational opportunities for and with young people. It is the largest non-uniformed young people’s organisation, supporting a network of over 7,000 youth groups, clubs and projects across the UK, with over 750,000 young people engaged through these networks. Bike Club will offer opportunities to gain UK Youth’s Youth Achievement Awards through cycling activities.
http://www.ukyouth.org/

ContinYou provides expertise in community learning and health improvement, fulfilling a major role in supporting the development of community focused schools and offering out of school hours and informal learning opportunities to children, young people and adults beyond the school day and curriculum.
http://www.continyou.org.uk

The development of Bike Club in Scotland has been funded by Asda’s Pedal Power campaign.

Right To Ride to School

Right To Ride to School
CTC believes that all children should have the right to cycle to school. Yet in some schools backward policies mean many children are unable to cycle to school.
Chris Peck's picture

CTC delivers hundreds of protest letters to Royal Mail HQ

8 September 2010
On the morning of Wednesday 8 September 2010, we delivered around 700 letters of protest from CTC members to Royal Mail's new Chief Executive, Moya Greene, asking her to reconsider the decision to remove cycles from the Royal Mail transport fleet.
Keep Posties Cycling

The letters were delivered using a combination of bikes, including the Pashley Mailstar, one of the range of bikes currently used by Royal Mail. In addition, CTC also used a Danish cargo trike, the carrying capacity of which would solve the problem of the current fleet which cannot manage large amounts of parcels.

A representative of Royal Mail accepted the letters on behalf of Moya Greene. A meeting between Ms Greene and the All Party Cycling Group will be held on the 22nd September.

 

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  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

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