Promotion and Encouragement

Victoria Hazael's picture

Cycle to Work Day

CTC is proud to support Cycle to Work Day, a national event championed by multi-gold medal winning Paralympic cyclist, Dame Sarah Storey. It aims to encourage everyone to cycle to work for at least just one day - on Thursday 4 September 2014.
Female cycle commuter cycling away from the camera

According to Census data, 760,000 people in the UK cycle to work regularly - this number keeps growing steadily, but with Cycle to Work Day's help, we are aiming to make those numbers skyrocket this year and beyond!

By 2021, Cycle to Work Day  hopes to see a million people regularly commuting to work by bike. Last year's event saw a Herculean effort from the 20,000 commuters who hit the streets and cycled over a quarter of a million miles on Cycle to Work Day.

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Cherry Allan's picture

How to encourage cycling at schools with anti-cycling policies

Is your child's school trying to ban or discourage cycling? Here's a guide designed to help tackle the sort of barriers that keep cropping up. It's mainly for parents, but we hope it'll also be useful for teachers, heads, governors, councils, after-school programmes and, of course, children.
Children cycling to school

There is plenty of information available on how to promote cycling at schools that already have a positive outlook (you can learn more about this in the 'Working with the Willing' section). This campaigning kit, however, is primarily to help people who are trying to change the attitudes of obstructive schools.

Cherry Allan's picture

Cycle-friendly schools and colleges (CTC views)

Schools and colleges should encourage cycling because it's good both for children and for the local and wider environment.
Children cycling to school
Headline Messages: 
  • Cycling to school or college helps pupils develop their physical health and fitness. It can also help boost their confidence, independence and sense of self-worth, plus their navigational and road-craft skills.
  • Equally, promoting cycling to school is a good way to tackle local congestion, pollution and road danger created by the school run.
  • Involving pupils, parents, teachers and school governors in joint action to make the trips they generate more sustainable can unite a school community and provide a learning experience in social and environmental responsibility and project management.
  • Cycling is a skill for life. Encouraging as many children as possible to see it as viable transport helps ward off car dependency in adulthood, and contributes to reducing the volume of motor traffic in the future.
Key facts: 
  • About 50% of primary school children say they want to cycle to school, but in England only around 1% of children aged 5-10 and 2% of children aged 11-15 cycled to school in 2013.
  • In the Netherlands, around 49% of primary school children cycle to and from school, 37% walk and only 14% are brought and collected by car. In secondary school, the cycling share is even higher. 
  • At well over 40%, cars are the most common form of transport used for the school/college run; travel for education is responsible for about 29% of trips between 8 and 9 am.
  • The average distance travelled to get to school/college is approximately 3 miles.
  • In the UK, about 30% of children aged 2-15 are either overweight or obese and, without action, 25% of them could be obese by 2050. In England, only round 21% of boys and 16% of girls aged 5-15 meet the current physical activity levels for their age group.
  • 10-16 year-old boys who cycle regularly to school are 30% more likely and girls 7 times more likely to meet recommended fitness levels.
  • Children who walk or cycle to school concentrate better than those who are driven there.
CTC View (formal statement of CTC's policy): 
  • Involving the whole school community (pupils, teachers, governors and parents), schools and colleges should:
    • Actively recognise the health, social, environmental and educational benefits of encouraging students and staff to cycle.
    • Develop, act on and monitor School Travel Plans that have cycling at their core; and publish pro-cycling policies.
    • Arrange for Bikeability training and other activities to promote safe, fun and responsible cycling.
    • Provide high quality facilities for pupils who cycle (e.g. parking, lockers for equipment etc).
    • Remove all barriers to cycling (e.g. bans on parking cycles on the premises).
    • Not impose restrictions on those who do cycle (e.g. a requirement to wear cycle helmets).
    • Work with the local highways authority to improve road safety in the area.
  • Local authorities should:
    • Work positively with schools/colleges about cycling and offer resources to help them develop their Travel Plans.
    • Jointly identify hostile conditions on local roads and treat them to help make cycling to and from school/college as hazard-free, attractive and convenient as possible (e.g. by introducing 20 mph speed limits, providing safe cycling links etc).
    • School inspections and self-evaluations should assess the measures that school/colleges take to encourage active travel and reduce the impact they have on traffic volumes and road danger. 
Download full campaigns briefing: 
Publication Date: 
August 2014
jayne.rodgers's picture

CTC helps out at Watchtree Wheelers

The CTC inclusive cycling officer for the North West has been busy helping out at Watchtree Wheeler's opening event for their new tarmac circuit; Ryan, the manager of the Watchtree Wheelers, arranged for the track to be opened by para-Olympian cyclist Karen Darke.
CTC hand cycle in action at the watchtree wheelers grand opening

CTC's Inclusive Cycling Champion for the North West recently joined forces with Cycling Projects to expand the range of adaptive cycles for people to try out at the opening of the new track for the Watchtree Wheelers at Watchtree Nature Reserve in Cumbria.

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Petitioning for a green route to Heysham

Lancashire cycle campaign group Dynamo has been successfully drumming up public support for a proposed green cycle route to connect Lancaster to Heysham.
Proposed Heysham - Lancaster route

The proposal for a new green cycle route to Heysham, as an extension to the Lancaster cycle network, has been made by local cycle campaign group Dynamo.

The group organised a public petition to show the level of support for the scheme and launched an e-petition on Lancashire County Council's website. The group's e-petition and paper petitions collected an impressive 2,412 signatures over the 3 month period leading up to 28 June 2014.

CTC Jayne Rodgers's picture

Women's Cycling Forum discusses inclusive cycling

The Women's Cycling Forum in Edinburgh met for the first time recently. As CTC's Inclusive Cycling Officer for the North West, Jayne Rodgers was invited to be there to present and facilitate a round table discussion about inclusive cycling.
Break-out for discussion a the WCF

Saturday 14 June saw the first meeting of the Women's Cycling Forum in Edinburgh. My reasons for being there were many, but primarily I was invited to present a short summary of the ICC (Inclusive Cycle Champions) programme currently being run in the English regions and also funded by the Big Lottery. The programme is a being conducted in partnership with cycling projects.

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Suzanne Forup's picture

Glasgow Cycle Festival

CTC’s Assistant Head of Development in Scotland loves a festival - the mud, the camping and the avoidance of washing - so this year she’s managed to get involved with organising two. One of them, the Glasgow Cycle Festival, kicks off this Friday with a leisurely bike ride to the WEST brewery!
Glasgow Cycle Festival logo

Nearly a year ago I sat in the ‘office’ - a shipping container with a sofa - at Free Wheel North with three cycling colleagues eating cherries as we airily suggested ideas for our yet un-named cycling festival. We didn't have any money and it wasn't in anyone's work plan. But we didn't let that stop us. One funding bid, a lot more talking and a whole load of work later the first Glasgow Cycle Festival is about to launch...

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JacquiShannon's picture

CTC has 50 charity places for RideLondon

The Prudential RideLondon has quickly risen to the top of the top of the list of 'must do' events for serious amatuer road cyclists and many were disappointed not to secure a spot. Luckily, as an official partner for the event CTC has 50 places to fill via ballot.
RideLondon logo

The 50 places available are believed to be the last available for any hopeful participants. Earlier in the year, 80,000 people entered the ballot to take part in the 100-mile race.

ElizabethBarner's picture

The Women's Tour - does racing turn anyone on to cycling?

On a soggy day I milled in the rain for two hours with cold, soaked kids to watch the Women’s Tour - and to my utter amazement it was worth it!
Children from Barley Croft school getting inside knowledge

The Women’s Tour of Britain passed within 5 miles of my home this week and I had decided I wasn’t going to bother watching it.  It’s hard to over (under?) estimate the degree to which I don’t care about competitive sport, cycling included.

I’m not sure I have the language for my degree of disinterest.  No matter how much I like doing something in my daily life or admire it in yours, the minute you add competition, you’ve lost me.

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BradleyAHoward's picture

Lancashire Campaign to appeal to the local council for the introduction of a new cycle system

A CTC-member keen to back the CTC-fight, has linked up with a local Dynamo Group to lobby their local Council to persuade them to install a new public-backed cycle routing system.
One of the locations that a Lancashire campaigner is looking to be opened up

Lancashire-CTC-Campaigner - Paul Stubbins, has joined forces with  Lancashire and District Cycle Campaign (LDCC), to rally Lancashire County Council (LCC) to provide safer routes for cyclists. Paul told of how locals were all for his proposed improvements.

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