Off-Road Access

Victoria Hazael's picture

Cycletopia – turning cycling dreams into reality

CTC, the national cycling charity has created ‘Cycletopia’ – an imaginary town made up of 15 real life examples in the UK of the best ways to promote, protect and inspire cycling.
Cycletopia includes 15 real life examples of good schemes to promote cycling

CTC Chief Executive Gordon Seabright said: “Great Britain proved this summer we have the best cyclists in the world. Now, we need to create towns and cities that are world class for cycling. There are already great things being done right here in the UK to improve cycling; they just need to happen across all our towns and cities. Cycletopia aims to help every local authority learn from what other places are doing to increase the numbers of cyclists and reduce traffic congestion.”

Contact Information: 

CTC Press Office
Email: publicity@ctc.org.uk
Telephone: 0844-736-8453

Notes to Editors: 

An interactive map of Cycletopia can be found on CTC’s website: http://www.ctc.org.uk/cycletopia.

High resolution and detailed images of Cycletopia are also available from CTC Press Office.

Cycletopia is drawn by the cartoonist and cyclist Peter Welleman.

CTC, the national cycling charity, inspires and helps people to cycle and keep cycling.

We work to protect and promote cycling to create a healthier, cleaner world, now and for the future. We want the UK to be a place where it’s easy and safe for people of all ages to cycle, whatever their ability, background or income. We believe that cycling is more than just transport; it makes you feel good, gives you a sense of freedom and creates a better environment for everyone.

We encourage all types of cycling, on the road or off it.  We support you if you already ride, or would like to ride, to work or school, for health, touring, sport and leisure – or just because it’s fun.

We’ve been working for cycling for over a century. Nationally and locally, we use our knowledge to influence decision makers and help people discover how cycling can change lives.

• We provide expert, practical help and advice.
• We support individuals and communities.
• We protect cyclists’ interests.
• We campaign to make cycling mainstream and to remove the things that stop people cycling.
• We help people develop the confidence and skills to cycle.
• We promote the benefits of cycling to individuals, to society and to the economy.

CTC is an independent charity, and relies on 69,000 members, volunteers, grant funders and partners for support. Without them, we would not be able to do our vital work in communities inspiring hundreds of thousands of people across the UK to cycle.

 

Cherry Allan's picture

Your chance to help open up the English rights of way network for cycling

6 August 2012
The Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs' consultation on the processes for recording, diverting and extinguishing public rights of way (England) is a chance to suggest ways to make it easier for cyclists to engage with the system and help open more of the countryside for cycling.
This footpath is a metalled road, but the bridleway is a muddy trail!

At the moment, the system is extremely bureaucratic, but the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs' (Defra) consultation on the processes involved is a good opportunity to press for the changes that will help enhance the experience of cycling in the countryside.

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Chris Peck's picture

Forest Access Panel - green light for walkers, amber for everyone else

6 July 2012
The Independent Forestry Panel was set up in 2011 to advise the Government on the ownership and management of English forests following the public outcry over plans to sell off the English Forestry Commission forests. That panel has now reported and the recommendations are helpful.
Nearly all dedicated off-road trails are located on Forestry Commission land

In its final report the panel recognises the high value of these woods for recreation, and recommends that they should continue to be publicly owned and managed for timber, recreation and conservation, and that this is best achieved if the Forestry Commission is managed as a trust on behalf of the nation.

The Government has welcomed the report, indicating that it is minded to retain forests in public ownership. A formal response expected in January 2013.

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Cherry Allan's picture

Respond to the Government's consultation English rights-of-way legislation

The Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs' consultation on the processes for recording, diverting and extinguishing public rights of way (England) is a chance to suggest ways to make it easier for cyclists to engage with the system and help open more of the countryside for cycling.
This footpath is a metalled road, but the bridleway is a muddy trail!

Why do cyclists need to respond to this consultation?

At the moment, the system for recording, diverting and extinguishing public rights of way in England is extremely bureaucratic, but the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs' (Defra) consultation on the processes involved is a good opportunity to press for the changes that will help enhance the experience of cycling in the countryside.

Chris Peck's picture

Welsh plan for connected communities - why detail is important

The Welsh Government is about to legislate to force local authorities to map out and plan improvements to the cycle networks. Although a great step, I think it's vital that the routes are of a proper standard to make cycling attractive and feasible.
NCN 8 in the Wye Valley

I greatly enjoyed a tour cycling the length Wales using National Cycle Network (NCN) Route 8 - Lôn Las Cymru - a couple of years ago. The route follows minor roads and, if starting from the south, begins on the Taff Trail, a traffic-free route that heads north from Cardiff. It's routes like these that local authorities in Wales will have to map out and plan improvements to under the proposed legislation.

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Andy Hawes's picture

Where can I cycle off-road?

Here in the UK we have a comprehensive network of routes and trails available to cyclists to get you out into the countryside. Here we clarrify where you can legally ride off-road.
Public Bridleway Sign

Where can I ride...?

Off road cyclists' can legally cycle on the network of byways and bridleways across England and Wales. For families and beginners there are also a number of old railway tracks and canal tow paths across the UK that often form part of the national cycle network and make for excellent training ground.

CTC's picture

Bike Club Comes to The Trax

5 April 2012
The Trax Off Road Racing Club in Tottenham has been successful in a bid for a Bike Club grant.
Illustration of The Loop (Back On Track, by kind permission of the Trax)

The Trax Off Road Racing Club in Tottenham has been awarded a Bike Club grant to encourage young people in the area to take up cycling.

The superb new Lordship Loop BMX and MTB pump track, will be looked after by Haringey Council through The Trax who are holding a Launch Event.

Daniel Mintz of The Trax says:

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Cherry Allan's picture

Developing new paths for cycling in the countryside

Do you ride - or want to ride - on a particular path, but can't tell whether you're allowed to do so? Does your favourite bridleway suddenly turn into a footpath and you wish it didn't? Do you want to do something about it? Read on...
Riding off-road

Background

How to tell where cycling's legal

  • Footpaths are open to walkers only (yellow waymarkings)
  • Bridleways are open to walkers, horse riders and cyclists (blue waymarkings)
  • Restricted byways are open to walkers, cyclists, horse riders and horse drawn vehicles (plum waymarkings)
  • Byways Open to All Traffic (BOATs) are open to walkers, cyclists, horse riders, horse-drawn vehicles and motor vehicles (red waymarkings).

A list of all recorded public rights of way i

Cherry Allan's picture

Reporting obstructions (England and Wales)

What's the best thing to do if you find your favourite bridleway or byway impassable because of a fallen tree, or a gate that wasn't there before? This guide explains the process.
Obstruction on bridleway

What is an obstruction?

  • Not all obstructions are obstructions in law. Legally, an obstruction is anything that “prevents the convenient use of the way by passengers”, and “substantially prevents the public from having free access over the whole of the highway which is not purely temporary in nature”.
  • An obstruction need not block the whole way, but just partially restrict access to it, e.g.
Cherry Allan's picture

Forest access - updates on the Independent Panel on Forestry

Woodland is an excellent setting for cycling, so CTC has welcomed some positive statements in an official progress report on the future of England's publicly owned forests.
Cyclists benefit from current access rights to Forestry Commission trails

The report from the Independent Panel on Forestry, set up by the Government after it abandoned plans to sell off  much of England’s forests in 2011 (see 'campaign background' below), reflects the overwhelming support for continuing public ownership and backs up the importance of access for different users. It says:

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