Designed for Cycling

Chris Peck's picture

New guidance on shared use routes

A new guidance note from the Department for Transport on shared use routes for pedestrians and cyclists has been published. CTC and other user groups had previously submitted comments. Although it improves the situation a little, major problems remain, particularly around ensuring route quality.
Shared use routes for cycling - new guidance from the DfT

Last year the Department for Transport asked for advice from CTC and other organisations on new guidance regarding shared use routes. An earlier draft of this document appeared in 2004, and in 2008 subsequent guidance set out the principles behind designing infrastructure for cyclists.

CTC's picture

Support CTC Portsmouth's campaign to complete a cycle route along the A3

For many years now members of CTC Portsmouth, lead by local campaigners Robert Sebley and Mike Ashton, have been campaigning for a cycle route through the A3 Butser cutting. Now is your chance to support them by signing their petition.
Brave Cyclist on A3 Trunk Dual Carriageway Butser

In the early 1990s the A3 road north from the A3(M) was replaced by a dual carriageway that, for the vast majority of cyclists, does not offer an acceptable safety level. The Highways Agency built cycle tracks alongside the A3, south from Queen Elizabeth Country Park to North Horndean and from Petersfield to Liphook. A map of the area can be found here.

Comments

Be the first to comment on this article. Login or register to comment.

All comments are reactively-moderated and must obey our moderation policy.

Chris Peck's picture

Minister opens new cycle path alongside the A27 in East Sussex

25 June 2012
A missing link in the cycle path network alongside the A27 has been opened by the Minister for Transport, Norman Baker MP. The route is another step in providing direct links between towns and villages in an area dominated by a major road.
Members of East Sussex CTC at the opening of the new A27 cycle path

The A27 carries 22,000 vehicles per day along the 1-mile stretch in question, and although a diversionary route through Glynde has been in place for a few years it involved climbing up the hillside and a two mile diversion.

The section of the route links the existing cycle track east from Firle with the A26 junction at Beddingham - see map of the area here.

Comments

Be the first to comment on this article. Login or register to comment.

All comments are reactively-moderated and must obey our moderation policy.

Chris Peck's picture

Government devotes an additional £15m to fix junctions

26 June 2012
In the 2012 Budget the Chancellor allocated £15m to fix problem junctions in London. Now another £15m has been found to spend on junctions outside London. The additional funding is a testament to The Times's 'Cities fit for cycling' campaign in the spring.
The Times' #cyclesafe campaign generated 10,000 reports of bad junctions

The Minister in charge of cycling issues, Norman Baker MP, said that the fund will be used to support improvements to junctions with poor safety records. The Department will work with local authorities and the Cycling Stakeholder Forum, on which CTC is represented, to identify the major junctions.

This fund will provide capital support to improve safety at junctions identified as having a record of road incidents that have resulted in cyclists being killed or seriously injured."

Comments

Be the first to comment on this article. Login or register to comment.

All comments are reactively-moderated and must obey our moderation policy.

Chris Peck's picture

Brighton's Old Shoreham Road: the cycle-ways to the future?

18 June 2012
Innovative cycle lanes with a degree of separation from the road have been introduced on Old Shoreham Road in Brighton. While not perfect, these new lanes are about the best that can be done under current highway design regulations.
Cycling Minister Norman Baker MP opened the cycle lanes

The new lanes are designed to give a degree of separation from motor vehicles, without completely sacrificing priority over side-roads or at major junctions. The width varies from around 1.5m to over 2m wide, with most of the space for the lanes having been taken from the carriageway. At junctions with the main roads cycles have a 5 second headstart traffic light.

Comments

Be the first to comment on this article. Login or register to comment.

All comments are reactively-moderated and must obey our moderation policy.

Chris Peck's picture

Could Northern Ireland go 20 mph?

Conall McDevitt MLA has tabled a Private Member's Bill in the Northern Ireland Legislative Assembly which seeks to make 20mph the default speed limit on most residential roads in the 6 counties.
20mph could be the default residential speed limit in Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland is uniquely placed to do this: the entire road network is under the control of a single highway authority - the Roads Service - which is responsible for every road, bridge and street light across the area. It is directly controlled by the Department for Regional Development, which means that decisions can be made at the national level over local streets.

Comments

Be the first to comment on this article. Login or register to comment.

All comments are reactively-moderated and must obey our moderation policy.

Chris Peck's picture

What does CTC's membership think about infrastructure?

In April CTC ran a survey of attitudes of cyclists towards road design and infrastructure. A report on the survey has now been published and reveals a broad consensus behind improving design standards of cycle facilities.
Wide, well designed cycle track in The Hague

CTC is currently reviewing all its policies. On the fraught topic of cycle infrastructure and road design CTC decided to elicit cyclists’ views on the matter to inform the development of a new policy.

The survey gathered comments and measured attitudes to statements on the subject of cycle infrastructure and transport planning for cyclists. 1,130 people responded to the survey, mostly members of CTC.

Comments

Be the first to comment on this article. Login or register to comment.

All comments are reactively-moderated and must obey our moderation policy.

Chris Peck's picture

Welsh plan for connected communities - why detail is important

The Welsh Government is about to legislate to force local authorities to map out and plan improvements to the cycle networks. Although a great step, I think it's vital that the routes are of a proper standard to make cycling attractive and feasible.
NCN 8 in the Wye Valley

I greatly enjoyed a tour cycling the length Wales using National Cycle Network (NCN) Route 8 - Lôn Las Cymru - a couple of years ago. The route follows minor roads and, if starting from the south, begins on the Taff Trail, a traffic-free route that heads north from Cardiff. It's routes like these that local authorities in Wales will have to map out and plan improvements to under the proposed legislation.

Comments

Be the first to comment on this article. Login or register to comment.

All comments are reactively-moderated and must obey our moderation policy.

Chris Peck's picture

Brighton goes against the flow

Contra-flow cycling is coming to more streets in the North Laine neighbourhood of central Brighton.
Jubilee St has a contra-flow cycle lane - 12 more will only be signed only

Brighton's North Laine neighbourhood is a vibrant shopping area, tucked in between the railway station, the main road north to London and the historic town centre. Narrow terraced streets were long ago made one-way to reduce through motor traffic. But, as with nearly every one-way restriction over the decades, no concession was made for cyclists.

Comments

Be the first to comment on this article. Login or register to comment.

All comments are reactively-moderated and must obey our moderation policy.

Chris Peck's picture

Crashing into a pothole - what happened next

In 2008, I was riding to work in central London when I hit a pothole, catapulting me over the handlebars into the road. I incurred nasty facial injuries and the crash destroyed my bike. CTC's legal team forced the highway authority into admitting liability, resulting in compensation being paid out.
Chris in the pothole that brought him down

The crash happened at rush hour on a wet day. There was masses of surface water on the roads and visibility was poorer than normal.  

At the time a hotel was being constructed by the road and large construction vehicles were coming to and fro constantly. I was trying to stay well away from one of these lorries when I hit a very deep water-filled pothole, causing the front wheel on my bike to collapse and sending me face first onto the road.

Comments

Be the first to comment on this article. Login or register to comment.

All comments are reactively-moderated and must obey our moderation policy.

Syndicate content

Archive

  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Gordon Seabright
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541
  • CTC Charitable Trust: A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.5125969. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1104324 and Scotland No SC038626

 

Terms and Conditions