Designed for Cycling

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Brighton cyclists celebrate 2-way cycling!

Local cycle campaign group Bricycles has long called for the reinstatement of 2-way cycling, running a “One way? No way” campaign...
CTC Campaigner Becky Reynolds cycling legally through North Laine, Brighton

Local cyclists in Brighton can now cycle legally in any direction through North Laine, the network of shopping and residential streets near Brighton Station.

Traffic orders by Brighton and Hove City Council exempt cyclists from one-way restrictions in Trafalgar Street, Gloucester Road, Gloucester Street, Vine Street, Robert Street, Kensington Street and 7 other streets (Church Street, Foundry Street, Kemp Street, Kensington Place, Over Street, Queen’s Gardens, and Tidy Street). New cycling signs have been marked out on the roads.

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Chris Peck's picture

Big Apple takes a bite out of streets

New York City has been radically shifting space on its main thoroughfares away from cars, providing high quality cycle facilities, more space for pedestrians and better bus networks. Now research is starting to show the economic and social benefits.
New York City has begun to transform major streets

Over the last few years New York has undertaken a major programme of work to improve conditions for walking, cycling and public transport, by removing space from motor traffic. 

Many of the hostile, 5+ lane wide, network of north-south avenues on Manhattan have been transformed, and high quality, wide cycle lanes installed. Removing capacity for motor traffic has resulted in massively reduced casualties, while the improvement to public space has, in some cases, led to improvements in the local economy.

9th Avenue's new design has resulted in:

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Chris Peck's picture

Proposed new junction designs show little sign of innovation

Transport for London has just released proposed new junction designs to improve conditions for cyclists. These schemes involve very minor changes to the road layouts, which in themselves may make conditions slightly easier but they show little sign of innovative or bold thinking.
Proposals for Lambeth Bridge lack ambition

For several months now Transport for London (TfL) has been consulting stakeholders on the first out of the 100 junctions they aim to make better for cyclists.

This project stems from the disaster at Bow Roundabout, where a newly redesigned junction was partly implicated in a death of a cyclist, Brian Dorling, in 2011. Together with pressure from the Times's Cities fit for cycling campaign, the Government provided £15m for junctions in London, followed by another £15m for other parts of England.

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Roger Geffen's picture

CTC declares support for quality segregation while still opposing "farcilities"

12 October 2012
CTC has published its revised policy on infrastructure setting out an ambition to see “a massive step-change in cycle use, so that people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities can feel able to cycle safely and confidently for all types of journey.”
CTC supports high quality facilities - not fiddly pavement conversions

The new policy calls for neighbourhoods, town centres and road networks to be “fundamentally redesigned to be ‘people-friendly’, with cycling not only contributing to a reduction in car dependence, but also benefiting from it”.

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Chris Peck's picture

From the archive - The Times, 1st August 1934

In 1934 the Times published a statement from the Cyclists' Touring Club on road safety. Many of the issues raised still resonate - while in other areas the suggestions appear ludicrous in the modern day.
The Times carried CTC's views on road safety

Things weren't going well in the 1930s. As cars became more powerful, and the interests of the motorist began to become entwined with the establishment, legislators decided to abandon the 20 mph speed limit. 

For four years, carnage reigned - the rate of injury and death climbed, with cyclists making up almost a quarter of road deaths - an astonishing 1,324 deaths out of 5,862 in total in 1933 and 1,400 out of 6,502 by 1935.

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Chris Peck's picture

Labour promises push on cycling

2 October 2012
Maria Eagle MP, the Shadow Secretary of State for Transport, has endorsed the Times manifesto on cycling and promised to implement its demands in full. The statement follows last week's commitment at the Liberal Democrat conference calling for widespread 20 mph speed limits.
Maria Eagle endorsed the Cities fit for cycling campaign

At the Labour Party Conference in Manchester, Maria Eagle MP spoke to delegates setting out her views on high speed rail, bus reform and active travel. 

She congratulated the Times on its 'Cities fit for cycling' campaign, and demanded the Government implement its manifesto in full. 

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MattHodges's picture

Cycletopia in Lancaster?

As one of the original Cycle Demonstration Towns (CDT) Lancaster has been trying to move towards the cycling nirvana depicted in CTC’s Cycletopia. So after all the effort and increased spending what have we achieved? Matt Hodges, CTC's representative in Lancaster, gives his views.
A new ramp now connects the canal towpath to the Lune Cycle Path

Lancaster CDT includes the seaside town of Morecambe and a wide rural hinterland.  Although bypassed by the M6 it had a major congestion problem on the city centre gyratory system and on the two road bridges over the river Lune.  But it also had the opportunity of a railway path linking Morecambe to Lancaster via a cycle and pedestrian bridge built for the Millennium. There were also other railway paths.

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Cycletopia

Cycletopia includes 15 real life examples of good schemes to promote cycling
CTC's Cycletopia is made up of real life examples of what can be done to make Britain's towns and cities more cycle friendly, combined in a single image.
Victoria Hazael's picture

Cycletopia – turning cycling dreams into reality

CTC, the national cycling charity has created ‘Cycletopia’ – an imaginary town made up of 15 real life examples in the UK of the best ways to promote, protect and inspire cycling.
Cycletopia includes 15 real life examples of good schemes to promote cycling

CTC Chief Executive Gordon Seabright said: “Great Britain proved this summer we have the best cyclists in the world. Now, we need to create towns and cities that are world class for cycling. There are already great things being done right here in the UK to improve cycling; they just need to happen across all our towns and cities. Cycletopia aims to help every local authority learn from what other places are doing to increase the numbers of cyclists and reduce traffic congestion.”

Contact Information: 

CTC Press Office
Email: publicity@ctc.org.uk
Telephone: 0844-736-8453

Notes to Editors: 

An interactive map of Cycletopia can be found on CTC’s website: http://beta.ctc.org.uk/cycletopia.

High resolution and detailed images of Cycletopia are also available from CTC Press Office.

Cycletopia is drawn by the cartoonist and cyclist Peter Welleman.

CTC, the national cycling charity, inspires and helps people to cycle and keep cycling.

We work to protect and promote cycling to create a healthier, cleaner world, now and for the future. We want the UK to be a place where it’s easy and safe for people of all ages to cycle, whatever their ability, background or income. We believe that cycling is more than just transport; it makes you feel good, gives you a sense of freedom and creates a better environment for everyone.

We encourage all types of cycling, on the road or off it.  We support you if you already ride, or would like to ride, to work or school, for health, touring, sport and leisure – or just because it’s fun.

We’ve been working for cycling for over a century. Nationally and locally, we use our knowledge to influence decision makers and help people discover how cycling can change lives.

• We provide expert, practical help and advice.
• We support individuals and communities.
• We protect cyclists’ interests.
• We campaign to make cycling mainstream and to remove the things that stop people cycling.
• We help people develop the confidence and skills to cycle.
• We promote the benefits of cycling to individuals, to society and to the economy.

CTC is an independent charity, and relies on 69,000 members, volunteers, grant funders and partners for support. Without them, we would not be able to do our vital work in communities inspiring hundreds of thousands of people across the UK to cycle.

 

Chris Peck's picture

New guidance on shared use routes

A new guidance note from the Department for Transport on shared use routes for pedestrians and cyclists has been published. CTC and other user groups had previously submitted comments. Although it improves the situation a little, major problems remain, particularly around ensuring route quality.
Shared use routes for cycling - new guidance from the DfT

Last year the Department for Transport asked for advice from CTC and other organisations on new guidance regarding shared use routes. An earlier draft of this document appeared in 2004, and in 2008 subsequent guidance set out the principles behind designing infrastructure for cyclists.

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  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Gordon Seabright
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541
  • CTC Charitable Trust: A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.5125969. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1104324 and Scotland No SC038626

 

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