Designed for Cycling

Chris Peck's picture

London's Cycle Hire least used and most expensive in Europe

Comparative data from various international bike share schemes show that London's cycle hire scheme is one of the least used and is the most expensive public scheme to operate. The lack of a cycle network in central London is likely to be the main reason why usage is so much lower.
London's scheme is used half as much as Paris's

Whereas each bike in Barcelona's scheme is used over 10 times per day, London's are used just 3 times.

'Boris Bikes' are used less than half as often as the Parisian Velib' scheme.

The study, undertaken by US-based sustainable transport think tank ITDP, explored data from four of the biggest schemes in Europe and a range of north and south American schemes, and made recommendations for how to run an effective bike share scheme.

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Roger Geffen's picture

Boris must stop ducking responsibility for action to save lives

CTC's Campaigns Director Roger Geffen argues that Boris's "finger-pointing" is pointed in the wrong direction, and calls for real solutions to the dangers faced by pedestrians as well as cyclists.
Boris is accused of mis-representing how cyclists die. Photo: Yurri (CC licence)

There has been a truly appalling death-toll on London’s roads in the past 13 days.  Prior to November 5th, there had been 8 cyclist fatalities in 10 months this year.  Since then, we have 6 cyclists’ and 3 pedestrians’ deaths within 13 days, all killed by lorries, coaches or buses.  In total, 9 of the 14 fatalities this year have involved lorries.

Chris Peck's picture

Government predicts cycling will FALL by 2040

While the Get Britain Cycling report calls on Government to aim for 10% of trips by 2025 and 25% of trips by 2050, in the bowels of the Department for Transport, technicians working on the National Transport Model are forecasting that cycling will fall for decades to come.
Cyclists crossing a road

Traffic modelling - the act of forecasting how much additional traffic there will be in future - is a dark art.

Forecasting is tricky: feedback loops and unknown future changes can rapidly upset any firm conclusions about current trajectories.

RhiaWeston's picture

Road safety procession to be held on Sat 21st in Birmingham in Hope Fennell's name

This week Hope Fennell would have turned 15 had her short life not been tragically ended in 2011. A procession calling for improved road safety will be held in her name on Saturday 21 September in Birmingham.
13-year-old Hope Fennell was killed whilst crossing a pedestrian crossing

Hope was killed by a lorry as she pushed her bike across a pedestrian crossing in Kings Heath, Birmingham in November 2011. The driver of the lorry, Darren Foster, moved his vehicle off when the lights turned green not knowing that at that moment Hope was in front of the vehicle. Hope died trapped under the lorry’s wheels.

RhiaWeston's picture

Why the Cyclist's Defence Fund is supporting one cyclist’s challenge of a FPN

A few weeks ago, Alex Paxton was issued with a fixed penalty notice (FPN) for failing to stop at a red light, yet all he was doing was positioning himself in front of a car which had illegally occupied the advanced stop box.
ASLs are good for cyclists, but could be better

Alex had intended to position himself in the cyclists’ box in order to turn right, but found that the box had been illegally occupied by a motorist. With concern for his own safety were he to stay in the inside lane and then have to cross three lanes of moving traffic in order to turn right, he decided to position himself ahead of the traffic and ahead of the Advanced Stop Line (ASL).

Chris Peck's picture

100 MPs reach a consensus on cycling

Around 100 MPs from all political parties attended a packed backbench business debate on cycling for 4 hours on Monday evening, with dozens of MPs taking part.
MPs debated cycling for 4 hours

The debate ended with an unopposed vote in favour of the motion "That this House supports the recommendations of the All-Party Parliamentary Cycling Group's report ‘Get Britain Cycling’; endorses the target of 10 per cent of all journeys being made by bike by 2025, and 25 per cent by 2050; and calls on the Government to show strong political leadership, including an annual Cycling Action Plan and sustained funding for cycling."

Chris Peck's picture

Cycle infrastructure trials could finally mean good cycle tracks are built

In June CTC was invited, along with many others from the cycling world, to see first hand the trials being conducted by TRL (formerly the Transport Research Laboratory) of various measures to enhance safety and provision for cycling.
The Dutch roundabout on the test track in Berkshire

My comment in the Guardian article on the subject seemed to disparage the idea. 

Actually, CTC is extremely supportive of the idea of improving the design of infrastructure along Dutch principles.

Chris Peck's picture

"Cycle proofing" - what does it actually mean in practice?

The funding settlement for cycling over the next two years will make a difference in the areas which are getting the cash, but the announcement also included some other aspects that may streamline cycle provision in other ways, including the much vaunted concept of "cycle proofing".
Cycle proofing means designing for cyclists from the outset

One of the points raised in the Government statement on cycling is the need for cycle proofing.

But what does cycle proofing mean in practice?

The Government defines cycle proofing as "taking action on a variety of fronts".

Chris Peck's picture

CTC's Top 10 for Number 10 to Get Britain Cycling

With a government announcement on cycling reportedly imminent, here are CTC's priorities for what we'd like it to say.
Will No 10 find the funding to make Cycletopia a reality?

A month ago The Times reported that an announcement on cycling from Number 10 was expected "early in August".

Cherry Allan's picture

Contra-flow cycling (2-way cycling in 1-way streets)

Allowing cyclists to ride two-way in one-way streets makes cycling more convenient and attractive...
Contra-flow street
Headline Messages: 
  • Allowing cyclists to ride two-way in one-way streets makes cycling in town and cities more convenient by opening up the street network and providing short-cuts. It can also help make cycling safer by offering alternatives to busy roads.
  • Contra-flow works well in many other European countries, where it is already widespread.
  • As it gives cycling an advantage over driving, contra-flow helps encourage a shift from cars to cycles for short local journeys.
CTC View (formal statement of CTC's policy): 
  • One-way systems put cyclists at a disadvantage, making their journeys longer and more stressful. Restoring two-way cycling on one-way streets can significantly improve the safety, convenience and attractiveness of cycling.
  • Each local authority should review all its one-way streets, with the aim of progressively converting them either for two-way use (particularly for one-way systems on more major roads), or permitting contra-flow cycling (e.g. on narrower streets), unless it can be demonstrated that there are overriding hazards to the safety of cyclists.
  • Contra-flow cycling should be facilitated through appropriate engineering treatments, depending on the traffic volumes, speeds and road widths involved.
  • In many cases, e.g. on quieter roads, unsegregated two-way cycling on an unmarked road is an appropriate solution. More heavily trafficked one-way roads should be provided with contra-flow lanes.
Download full campaigns briefing: 
Publication Date: 
August 2013
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