Designed for Cycling

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Success for local campaigners in Wendover

1 March 2012
The first cycle route to be installed in Wendover for five years was opened in the small Buckinghamshire town at the beginning of March.
Success for local campaigners in Wendover

This came after years of hard work and a final ferocious fight from local people and cycling campaigners, including local CTC volunteers, to ensure the parish council kept their promise of investment in cycling in the area.

Peter Hardy, Cabinet Member for Buckinghamshire County Council opened the route with a celebratory bike ride by children from local schools. An impressive swell of public support saw the route being saved after a last minute attempt to prevent £300,000 of investment in the local town, which is already suffering from car congestion and parking problems.

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Chris Peck's picture

Cities fit for cycling

The Times has launched a campaign to improve cycle safety following the serious injury to a reporter on the paper. An 8 point manifesto has been published, with the focus on lorries, junctions, cycle infrastructure and 20 mph as the default urban speed limit.
Cities fit for cycling

In November last year Mary Bowers, a journalist at The Times, was crushed by a lorry while cycling to work in east London. She remains in hospital unconscious 3 months on.

In response to this horrific event her colleagues on the paper have now launched a major campaign to increase safety for cyclists in Britain. In doing so they have taken advice from CTC and other organisations and come up with an 8 point plan of action.

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Chris Peck's picture

Government announces long awaited changes to signing policy

After years of lobbying for simple changes to traffic sign regulations, CTC is pleased that the Government has finally agreed to a relaxation of certain rules, such as permitting an ‘except cyclists’ plate to be used in conjunction with a ‘no entry’ sign.
No entry except cycles

The changes should make streets safer and road engineering cheaper. The move comes as part of the outcome of the Traffic Signs Review announced by Norman Baker MP.

The number of motor vehicles which contravened the restrictions was halved and there was an increase in the number of cyclists using the contraflow schemes compared to the prescribed solution of using the ‘no motor vehicles’ traffic sign. Signing the Way

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Chris Peck's picture

Portsmouth 20 mph limits lead to lower speeds and fewer casualties

15 September 2010
Two years after implementation of 20mph speed limits on 94% of the Portsmouth street network, results have shown that speeds fell, especially on roads where speeds were already high. Casualties have declined and attitudes of people to 20mph and both walking and cycling have improved.
Children campaigning for 20mph in Portsmouth

Since speeds were already low on most of the streets in the scheme (Portsmouth has narrow residential streets with lots of car parking), the overall reduction in speeds was low - around 1.3mph. However, on the streets where average speeds were greater than 24mph a 6.3mph reduction occurred.

Comparing the 3 years before the scheme was implemented and the 2 years afterwards, the number of recorded road casualties has fallen by 22% from 183 per year to 142 per year, faster than the fall in casualties in comparable areas elsewhere in the country.

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Chris Peck's picture

Portsmouth becomes first 20mph city

10 November 2009
The City of Portsmouth has become the first city to have 20mph on all of its residential streets. The move aims to make the streets safer for cyclists and pedestrians.
Children campaigning for 20mph in Portsmouth

According to Portsmouth City Council: "the 20mph limit is for roads where the average speed is already 24mph or less. We have installed prominent 20mph signs where drivers enter the new speed restrictions, as well as 'repeater' signs as reminders. It has been found elsewhere that this method reduces speeds by 3-4mph.  Road humps are not part of the scheme, although if speeds do not drop on particular roads, then residents will be consulted again to see if they want additional measures.

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New Vision for Cycling

New Vision for Cycling
A doubling of cycling use in 10 years, coupled with a halving the in risks of cycling, would generate economic benefits of £3.5 billion and save 600,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide annually.
Chris Peck's picture

Mixed reception for guidance on cycle infrastructure

12 October 2008
After years of lobbying for new guidance on infrastructure, CTC welcomed the publication of Cycle Infrastructure Design in October 2008. Although the document had improved since CTC commented on the draft, it is still weak on many aspects of the design of cycle facilities.
Cycle Infrastructure Design

CTC was pleased with the restatement of the Hierarchy of Provision (p. 10 of CID) for cycling which prioritises measures to reduce the volume and speed of traffic - i.e. tackling the major deterrents to cycling at source. 

However, there are also a number of important details which remain unsatisfactory, and in many ways the new document is significantly weaker than the original 1996 Cycle Friendly Infrastructure (CFI) guidelines.

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Highway Code cracked - more than 40 rules changed

15 June 2007
Following a sustained and high-profile campaign by CTC in 2007, over 40 rules of the revised Highway Code were changed to the benefit of cyclists. CTC had feared that the proposed wording would have undermined cyclists' right to use the road where cycle facilities were provided.
New Highway Code

The changes made to the Highway Code vary from the mundane to the fundamental. There are many new rules for cyclists on the use of crossings and for taking care around tramways. Others offer advice on whether cyclists should use cycle facilities. 

New rules 61 and 63 were those that aroused the greatest ire amongst cyclists. A discussion of how these rules and how they changed can be found here.

Some of the most useful rules, other than 61 and 63, are paraphrased below:

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Roger Geffen's picture

Why CTC challenged the latest version of the Highway Code

We all know of examples of where cycle facilities end dangerously, throwing you out into heavy traffic. So when new wording for the Highway Code suggested that cyclists should always use such facilities, we - along with thousands of CTC members - were up in arms.
Bad cycle facility

The Code's draft wording advised cyclists to "...use cycle routes when practicable and cycle facilities such as advanced stop lines, cycle boxes and toucan crossings where they are provided, as they can make your journey safer."

We felt that this advice, if accepted, would reinforce the erroneous belief that cycle facilities are essentially safety features.

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Anonymous's picture

Cyclist who refused to stay in the gutter wins re-trial

26 January 2007
A cyclist who was found guilty last year of inconsiderate cycling, whilst cycling in accordance with the National Standard for cycle training, has today won a re-trial at Shrewsbury Crown Court.
The road where Daniel Cadden was stopped by police

CTC member Daniel Cadden was cycling fast downhill on a single-lane carriageway when he was stopped by police who believed that the position he had taken in his lane was forcing cars to cross the solid white line in the centre of the road illegally in order to overtake. But rather than stop the cars that had broken the law, the officers decided to charge Daniel Cadden with inconsiderate cycling.

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