Designed for Cycling

Chris Peck's picture

Cycling in London - 30 years ago

A film produced by the Greater London Council in 1984, shows how many of the core network of cycle facilities were built through funds from a short lived Cycling Unit.
The GLC's film shows how little has changed since the 1980s

Back in the 1980s, cycling in Britain was undergoing a bit of a renaissance.

Having fallen to a nadir of just 3.7 billion kms cycled in 1973, the subsequent oil crisis following the Yom Kippur War saw cycling bouncing back to over 6bn kms. 

A second oil spike, this time triggered by the Iran-Iraq War, saw cycling rise again, to 6.4bn kms in the early 1980s.

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Mark Slater's picture

South West cycling advocates' network-building workshop

15 March 2014
Are you campaigning for cycling in the South West and want to find out how to translate your ideas into reality? If so, join us at our cycling advocates' network-building workshop in Plymouth on 15 March.
A map of South West England

Plymouth Council are the hosts for a day of cycling workshops at the Guildhall, Plymouth on 15 March.

The first of its kind, this event is set to examine cycling provision across the South West and will look at how cycle campaign networks can grow to support and influence local authorities for everyone's benefit.

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Roger Geffen's picture

CTC calls on councils to fund cycle facilities through road maintenance programmes

22 January 2014
As the Government proposes a £50m fund for maintaining pedestrian and cycling routes, CTC calls for councils to maximise the synergies between their cycling programmes and their planned road maintenance budgets.
New York track built through maintenance work. Photo D Passmore (CC licence)

CTC has welcomed Government proposals to earmark £50m annually for maintaining walking and cycling facilities, out of the £976m distributed annually to councils for local road maintenance.

However, CTC believes even more cycle-friendly improvements could be made very cost-effectively if councils considered ways to deliver new or improved cycle provision whenever they are planning to resurface a road.

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JacquiShannon's picture

Coventry junction scheme made safer by local campaigners

Despite the Department for Transport cycling policy, many councils do not prioritise walkers and cyclists in new road schemes. CTC representative George Riches pressed Coventry Council re-think the proposed Whitley Bridge Scheme making it signifigantly safer.
Satellite image superimposed with plan

On 6 February, the Coventry Council planning committee was expected to take a decision on a proposal to increase the traffic handling capacity of the access to the Jaguar Business Park at Whitley.

Chris Peck's picture

CTC objects to proposed second Lincoln bypass

Campaigners from CTC Lincolnshire have lodged an objection to the new road on the grounds that it will sever existing local roads and provide inadequate crossings. The road will be a test of the cycle proofing commitment made by the Prime Minister in 2013.
The proposed new bypass will sever minor roads used by cyclists

The new road will cost £96m for under 5 miles – £19m a mile – more than the money being spent on cycling by the Government in eight cycling cities and four National Parks.

£50m will come from central Government, with the rest from developers and the local council.

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Cherry Allan's picture

CTC welcomes official go-ahead for lights to help cyclists at junctions

News that the Department for Transport (DfT) has finally given the go-ahead to ‘low-level’ traffic lights has been welcomed by CTC, who have long campaigned for the move.
Low-level lights will help cyclists at junctions

The mini, cycle-specific lights help cyclists at junctions because they repeat the signal displayed on the main traffic lights at a level that makes them easier for people on bikes to see. The lights are already a common sight in most other European countries and proved very popular during track-based trials in the UK.

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olivercw's picture

Why should cyclists use Twitter?

Some say Twitter is a waste of time. It is, however, the world’s largest global conversation and is a very effective way for cyclists to network, campaign and communicate.
Twitter logo

Twitter is an information network made up of 140-character messages called 'Tweets'. It's an easy way to discover the latest news related to subjects you care about, and you can add pictures and videos too.

Roger Geffen's picture

CTC condemns rising toll of cyclists' deaths in London

14 November 2013
CTC demands action on cyclists’ safety in London after a fifth cyclist is killed in ten days on the capital’s roads.
A 'ghost bike' at the Bow Roundabout: photo by Diamond Geezer (Creative Commons)

In a terrible week for cycling in London, the total number of cyclists killed in 2013 has risen to 13, 8 of them killed by lorries. CTC is calling for serious improvements to cyclists' safety at major junctions, to the design of lorries, and to driver training, in order to avert more unnecessary deaths.

Roger Geffen's picture

CTC calls for swift progress as McLoughlin promises 'cycle-proofing' action

Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin has told cycling champion Chris Boardman that his department will do all it can to let councils introduce Dutch-style segregated cycle provision, while the Highways Agency has promised to review the cycling sections of its design guidance.
Rule changes are urgently needed so UK cycle tracks can have the same ju

CTC has welcomed the announcement, which came after Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin met with British Cycling and its Policy Advisor, the former Olympic gold-medallist Chris Boardman, followed by 3 days of talks between CTC and Department for Transport (DfT) officials last week (21-23 October).

RhiaWeston's picture

Cyclist to challenge Fixed Penalty Notice after £2300 raised for legal fees.

Cyclists have shown overwhelming support for Alex Paxton's challenge of the FPN he received a few weeks ago. Individual donors have given a total of £2669.50. Alex has submitted his request for a hearing in the Magistrates court to contest the FPN.
Alex Paxton is challenging an unfairly issued FPN

Alex had intended to position himself in the cyclists’ box in order to turn right, but found that the box had been illegally occupied by a motorist. With concern for his own safety were he to stay in the inside lane and then have to cross three lanes of moving traffic in order to turn right, he decided to position himself ahead of the traffic and ahead of the Advanced Stop Line (ASL).

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  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Gordon Seabright
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541
  • CTC Charitable Trust: A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.5125969. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1104324 and Scotland No SC038626

 

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