Commitment to Cycling

Get Britain Cycling

The All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group gets Britain cycling
CTC, with Sustrans, British Cycling and other cycling organisations, is campaigning for the Government to show strong leadership to Get Britain Cycling.
Chris Peck's picture

All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group launches 'Get Britain Cycling' inquiry

The All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group (APPCG), a cross-party group of MPs and Peers with an interest in cycling, has launched its 'Get Britain Cycling' inquiry into how to increase levels of cycling.
The Times campaign is 9 months old

The inquiry, which is being funded by News International, will hear evidence from a range of stakeholders involved in promoting cycling and cycle safety. See CTC's written evidence. Oral evidence sessions will take place in January and February 2013. The APPCG's report - which will be drafted by leading transport academic Prof Phil Goodwin - is due to be published in mid-April 2013.

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Big Apple takes a bite out of streets

New York City has been radically shifting space on its main thoroughfares away from cars, providing high quality cycle facilities, more space for pedestrians and better bus networks. Now research is starting to show the economic and social benefits.
New York City has begun to transform major streets

Over the last few years New York has undertaken a major programme of work to improve conditions for walking, cycling and public transport, by removing space from motor traffic. 

Many of the hostile, 5+ lane wide, network of north-south avenues on Manhattan have been transformed, and high quality, wide cycle lanes installed. Removing capacity for motor traffic has resulted in massively reduced casualties, while the improvement to public space has, in some cases, led to improvements in the local economy.

9th Avenue's new design has resulted in:

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Accessible Cycling for people with disabilities

February 2010 saw the launch of a new cycling class specifically for people with disabilities and learning difficulties in Swindon. Since then, the range of bikes has grown and the classes are full.
Cycling For All, disability bikes at the County Ground, Swindon

Thanks to the Big Lottery Fund, we were able to purchase over 20 different specially adapted bikes to be used at the County Ground running track on a weekly basis. What started as a once a week class for the general public turned into a twice a week open class with four additional privately booked sessions per week. This doesn’t include one-off events and summer courses.

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How CTC helped provide a perfect cycling solution for one family in Essex

CTC Cycle Champions is unashamedly enthusiastic about getting people back on a bike, often after years and sometimes for the first time ever. Many go on to make cycling a regular part of their daily lives and the benefits are huge. Lee and Emily's story is a great example.
Emily leads a group of mums cycling with their kids

Lee and Emily joined CTC’s Cycle Champions rides after hearing about them from the ACE Health Trainer at Colchester Garrison.

With two young children, lots of family pressures and a tight budget, they were looking for a cheap solution to become fitter that fitted in with their busy lives.

The Cycle Champions rides offered the use of children’s trailers – a perfect solution for Lee and Emily and countless other army and civilian families.

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Government's response to Select Committee branded 'feeble' by CTC

CTC is urging Ministers to show much stronger leadership on encouraging more and safer cycling, after a lamentably weak response to the Commons Transport Select Committee’s inquiry earlier this year on road safety.
The Government's response to the Select Committee inquiry

CTC’s President Jon Snow was one of the witnesses at the inquiry in April this year, along with Times editor James Harding, and CTC’s Vice-President Josie Dew. He used the occasion to make a strong call for leadership on cycling and cycle safety, stressing that “Leadership means joined up Government with all departments working together to further cycling.”

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Labour promises push on cycling

2 October 2012
Maria Eagle MP, the Shadow Secretary of State for Transport, has endorsed the Times manifesto on cycling and promised to implement its demands in full. The statement follows last week's commitment at the Liberal Democrat conference calling for widespread 20 mph speed limits.
Maria Eagle endorsed the Cities fit for cycling campaign

At the Labour Party Conference in Manchester, Maria Eagle MP spoke to delegates setting out her views on high speed rail, bus reform and active travel. 

She congratulated the Times on its 'Cities fit for cycling' campaign, and demanded the Government implement its manifesto in full. 

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Notes from the LibDem conference fringe

Earlier this week I spoke at two fringe events at the LibDem conference. The first was also addressed by Julian Huppert MP, co-chair of the All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group, the second by cycling minister Norman Baker. Both set out their stall as highly impressive advocates for cycling.
LibDem logo

The first meeting was hosted by the Freight Transport Association (FTA) together with the Times newspaper and chaired by their transport correspondent Philip Pank, one of the journalists behind the paper's inspirational Cities fit for cycling campaign.

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Health and cycling

Cycling is good exercise and it's easy to fit into the daily routiine. If more people took it up, it could help ward off the health crises facing the NHS...
Healthy cyclist
Headline Messages: 
  • Cycling is excellent exercise. More cycling will help more people meet the recommended physical activity guidelines, improve their physical and mental health and well-being, while reducing their risk of premature death and ill-health.
  • Cycling is far more likely to benefit an individual’s health than damage it; and the more cyclists there are, the safer cycling becomes – the ‘safety in numbers’ effect.
  • Cycling fits into daily routines better than many other forms of exercise, because it doubles up as transport to work, school or the shops etc. It’s easier than finding extra time to visit the gym and far less costly.
  • Lack of exercise can make people ill. It can lead to obesity, coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, cancers, type 2 diabetes and other life-threatening conditions.
  • Obesity in particular is a growing, costly burden to the health service. Without action, 60% of men, 50% of women and 25% of children will be obese by 2050 in the UK. 
  • CHD is the UK’s biggest killer – well over 90,000 people die of it each year with over 33% of these attributable to lack of physical activity.
  • Unlike driving, cycling causes negligible harm to others, either through road injuries or pollution, so it’s a healthy option not just for cyclists, but for everyone else too.
CTC View (formal statement of CTC's policy): 
  • Policy makers should recognise cycling as a healthy and convenient means of transport and recreation that could be incorporated into the ordinary day-to-day activity of millions of adults and children and so improve health and quality of life.
  • There is good evidence that cycling’s health benefits far outweigh the risks involved and that the more people who cycle, the safer it becomes – the ‘safety in numbers’ effect.
  • Cycling is also a benign mode of transport, causing negligible harm to others. Hence a switch from motorised travel to cycling would improve road safety for all by reducing road danger.
  • Public health and transport/planning policies, strategies and guidance, locally and nationally, should be mutually supportive in promoting and facilitating cycling as active travel; and they should clearly steer professionals towards cross-sector working. This will help tackle the serious, costly and growing crisis of physical inactivity and the health problems associated with it (e.g. obesity, heart disease etc).
  • Directors of Public Health (England) should take advantage of their return to local authorities to engage transport, town and spatial planning and other council departments (e.g. leisure and tourism) more closely in promoting cycling as active travel and recreation.
  • The NHS and its providers should actively promote cycling both to their own employees, to the people in their care, and to the general public; and they should invest in measures to support it (e.g. patient referral schemes, cycling facilities at sites as part of Travel Plans etc).
  • Transport and planning decisions should undergo a ‘health check’ to maximise the potential for positive impacts on active travel and minimise negative impacts. Tackling hostile road conditions is a priority because they put existing cyclists at risk and deter many others including children and young people.
  • Placing the onus solely on cyclists to protect themselves from injury does not tackle the risks they face at source. Health professionals should therefore remain cautious about cycle safety campaigns that focus on personal protective equipment.
Download full campaigns briefing: 
Publication Date: 
September 2012

Cycletopia

Cycletopia includes 15 real life examples of good schemes to promote cycling
CTC's Cycletopia is made up of real life examples of what can be done to make Britain's towns and cities more cycle friendly, combined in a single image.
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  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Carol McKinley (Acting)
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

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