Commitment to Cycling

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A Cycling Legacy to remember - Prudential RideLondon

The RideLondon festival saw cycling at its best, from families enjoying motor traffic-free roads in London to the peloton speeding through the Surrey Hills.
FreeCycle at Prudential RideLondon

Nearly 300 people had volunteered through CTC to help throughout the weekend and there was much praise on social media for the Dr Bike Service they provided, not to mention the valued work of the marshals.

There were so many smiling faces at such a great event."

CTC Chief Executive, Gordon Seabright.

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Velo-City 2013 - the 5 best presentations

CTC's Chris Peck attended and spoke at the biggest cycling advocacy conference in Vienna in June 2013. Here is his own presentation, and the pick of the crop from other sessions.
Cycle infrastructure in Vienna is well marked, but often shared with pedestrians

Velo-city is an annual global conference of cycling academics, practitioners and campaigners, organised by the European Cyclists' Federation.

It's been running for well over 30 years, with recent conferences in Vancouver (2012), Seville (2011), Copenhagen (2010) and Brussels (2009). 

CTC has presented at most of the recent conferences, and I was privileged to present some work on the way risk is analysed and how the pressure to reduce cycle casualties can conflict with efforts to increase cycle use.

Measuring the risk of cycling correctly

Chris Peck's picture

Government roads strategy promises to 'cycleproof' major roads

CTC has welcomed the announcement to 'cycleproof' the major road network, which comes just two weeks after two cyclists were killed on the A30 in Cornwall.
The new A3 at Hindhead has greatly improved cycling conditions

A new strategy, 'Action for Roads: a network for the 21st century', has been published by the Department for Transport.

In it, the Department acknowledges the problem that parts of the major road network "can create a barrier" to walkers and cyclists.

Cherry Allan's picture

Date set for Get Britain Cycling debate in Parliament and No. 10 announcement on cycling

The Chamber of the House of Commons will be the setting for a high profile debate and vote about cycling in September, with an announcement from the Prime Minister expected in August.
Get Britain Cycling (front cover)

[UPDATE: See details of the Prime Minister's announcement made on 12 August 2013].

Confirmation has just come in that MP Julian Huppert's request for a parliamentary debate on cycling has been successful.

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CTC urges Cameron to Get Britain Cycling after Treasury fails to do so

CTC is calling on David Cameron to 'Get Britain Cycling' after statements today and yesterday by the Chancellor and his Chief Secretary included billions for increased capacity on trunk roads and motorways, but failed to identify any earmarked funding for cycling.
Lots of money for new roads, very little for cycling

During a session of ministerial questions on transport in the Commons this morning, Norman Baker promised that an announcement on cycling funding was due “shortly”. 

Chris Peck's picture

Scotland revises action plan for cycling

The Cycling Action Plan for Scotland (CAPS), first published in 2009, set out the ambitious vision for 10% of trips to be made by bike by 2020. Over a third of the time has passed, but Scotland's modal share has barely increased.
The refreshed Cycling Action Plan for Scotland

The revised plan hasn't changed significantly: the vision for 10% remains, and the actions are a mix of infrastructure and promotion.

Unfortunately, the main problem - lack of money to see the Plan through to reality - remains a problem. Although the report acknowledges that £5-10 per head is required to sustain increases in cycling, no commitment is made to fund at that level.

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The Henley-on-Thames 'Short Cycle' Route

A short scenic route from Henley-on-Thames, around some of the more famous scenes in the Chilterns, and back to the riverside town to indulge in one of their finest cafes.
Ride start in Henley

Henley-on-Thames is a wonderful place to start and finish a bike ride. Not only is it a beautiful place to walk along the river or cycle around the black and white buildings, but it is full to the brim with restaurants and cafes to feed you up for a bike ride. It is also has a train station in the very heart of it.

Once you’ve cycled out from Henley-on-Thames, it doesn’t take long before you’re out of traffic and surrounded by countryside. The roads are reasonably quiet and tend to meander around cottages and farmland.  

Cherry Allan's picture

National planning policies

Planning policies and decisions can make all the difference to how people choose to make their journeys - i.e. whether to drive or to travel more sustainably by cycle or on foot.
Cycling through a new development
Headline Messages: 
  • Planning policies can help to reduce dependence on private cars (e.g. for work, shopping, leisure and other journeys), both by focusing developments in places that can be easily reached by cycling and other sustainable transport choices (e.g. preferring town centres to out-of-town locations), and by including good cycling provision in and around the development.
  • Good planning policies are vital to wider economic, environmental and health objectives. They should explicitly state that built and rural environments need to promote and cater well for walking and cycling to help boost active, healthy travel and recreation, reduce car-dependency and motor traffic volume, and make places attractive to live in and visit.
  • Just 2% of trips in the UK are made by cycle, compared to 10% in Germany, 18% in Denmark and 27% in the Netherlands. Planning policies covering the use of land and the layout of urban areas make an important contribution to such high levels of cycling.
CTC View (formal statement of CTC's policy): 

The role of the planning system

  • Planning policies locally and nationally make a significant impact on travel patterns and travel choice. They need to complement and support transport policy and programmes to promote cycling and other healthy and sustainable options. They should include policies on:
    • Locating development where it can be easily reached by walking, cycling and public transport;
    • Supporting pedestrian and cyclist-friendly urban transport strategies;
    • Providing good cycle access to and within new developments;
    • Ensuring the provision of cycle parking and other ‘trip end’ facilities (e.g. lockers and showers for employees etc.);
    • Adopting, implementing and monitoring travel plans as appropriate to the developments;
    • Securing appropriate developer contributions towards improved cycle provision in the surrounding area;
    • Requiring high standard design for the public realm to create an environment that is inviting for pedestrians and cyclists;
    • Considering the impact that planning decisions may have on recreational and utility cycling, particularly for long distance routes, local green spaces, the rights of way network, canals and riversides, disused railway lines and other transport corridors, national trails, national parks and forests, AONBs and other areas that provide valued opportunities for outdoor activity and recreation;
    • Ensuring that plans for the built environment contribute to improvements in public health.
  • National guidance should recognise that the historic association of economic growth with the growth of motor traffic is inherently unsustainable. It should therefore state unambiguously that planning decisions should reduce the need to travel by private car; and that sustainable, healthy modes offer economic and other benefits in their own right.

Making the planning system work locally

  • The Government should preserve and strengthen the ability of local communities to benefit fully from ‘planning gain’ (developer contributions), which is regularly used to provide for sustainable transport (e.g. high quality cycle routes to and in the vicinity of new developments).
  • Local authorities should set out policies in their development plans that resist development projects that would increase car dependent travel patterns and/or enable them to secure developer contributions for measures that benefit cycling.
  • Local authorities should always adopt a travel plan as part of a wider planning agreement for developments; and they should ensure that they are implemented and well monitored.

Monitoring and accountability

  • The Government should introduce ways to measure the specific carbon impacts of individual developments as part of the Transport Assessment process, and aggregate these so that the public can assess the overall impact of planning policies and decisions, both locally and nationally. It should be possible to dismiss plans on carbon grounds in the interests of achieving the legal limits set out in the Climate Change Act, and incentivise planners to ensure that low-carbon travel is properly accommodated.
  • Representatives of relevant NGOs and local communities should always enjoy meaningful input into planning decisions and the policies and strategies that inform them. Consultation on planning applications for all proposals, major and minor, should be supported by clear information, transparency, regulations and guidance. Communities should also be granted a limited third party right of appeal against planning permissions to which they object.
     
Download full campaigns briefing: 
Publication Date: 
June 2013
Cherry Allan's picture

Thousands Pedal on Parliament in Scotland

Around 4,000 cyclists gathered in Edinburgh on Sunday 19 May and rode to Holyrood to deliver an 8-point manifesto calling for more investment in cycling, slower speeds, and better facilities for cyclists on Scotland’s roads. Peter Hayman, CTC councillor for Scotland, pedalled with them...
CTC's Ian Richardson and Graeme Obree

"Some dampness and lack of sun", Peter says, "didn't stop an impressive turn out for the Pedal on Parliament (PoP) in Scotland yesterday.

"Last year, PoP was a new and exciting challenge to the Government, and I was up near the front of the action. This year, nearer the back, I saw a striking number of families with young children and what looked like novice cyclists who wanted to join in.

Supporters stretched back further than could be seen at the gathering point, the Meadows in Edinburgh."

Chris Peck's picture

2001 to 2011 - cyclist numbers change significantly

The number of people cycling to work has gone up in England and Wales by 17% from 2001 to 2011. In some areas, cycling is booming, but in others it is declining.
Hull's cycling culture is gradually declining, despite some improvements

I've already mapped the changes in cycle use by share of commuting trips in highway authorities.

Other maps showing the changes by district authority, and other modes, such as the changes in car commuting, are also available.

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  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

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