Commitment to Cycling

Dorset Cyclists’ Network - a model for nationwide campaigning

Dorset Cycling Network is concerned with bringing about change for cyclists by enabling individuals and institutions within Dorset to network, which yields an attractive model to deliver nationwide county collaboration.
The Dorset Cyclists' Network logo

Dorset Cyclists’ Network (DCN), which was founded in 1992, was designed to provide some cohesion between 11 South West towns, including Bournemouth and Poole, to campaign for cyclists’ needs, alongside CTC. It provides a very attractive example of how effectively multiple local authorities and key players can be lobbied when groups from smaller areas within a single county work in collaboration with one another to raise the profile of cycling across the county.

Cherry Allan's picture

Cycling levels in European countries

How does the UK's level of cycling compare with that of other European countries?

According to a 2013 report from the European Commission, levels of cycling in the UK do not compare at all well with most other EU countries.

Cherry Allan's picture

Cycling and the economy

Cycling contributes more than many people think to local and national economies...
Cyclist in shopping area
Headline Messages: 
  • Our excessive dependence on motorised road transport imposes significant economic costs on society. These include congestion, road casualties, physical inactivity and air pollution (and the associated damage to buildings, ecosystems, agriculture and health), as well as the geopolitical costs of maintaining fossil fuel supplies in an increasingly unstable global environment.
  • Cycling could substantially reduce these risks, while strengthening local economies in both urban and rural areas, supporting local businesses and property values, boosting the economic productivity of a healthy and satisfied workforce, and enabling disadvantaged groups to gain skills and access employment opportunities.
  • Local and national government, businesses and economic regeneration partnerships should therefore invest more heavily in promoting cycling; and the tax system should offer greater support.
CTC View (formal statement of CTC's policy): 
  • The economic benefits of investing in small scale projects that typically benefit cycling are often underestimated. On the other hand, car-dependence is a significant cost for society and large scale transport projects (e.g. roads) are not the value-for-money they are often thought to be.
  • Cycling makes a positive contribution to the national economy and it is a cost-effective investment. It can help:
    • Reduce congestion;
    • Improve public health and save NHS money;
    • Create jobs;
    • Save employers money and improve productivity;
    • Inject money directly into the economy via the cycle trade;
    • Boost the vitality of town centres;
    • Deliver goods efficiently;
    • Lift house prices.
  • The Treasury should incentivise cycling through:
    • Adhering to the principle that 'the polluter pays' as the basis of taxation of transport users;
    • Maintaining a tax-free mileage rate that makes cycling on business financially worthwhile;
    • Supporting cycle commuting schemes that save businesses and employees tax (e.g. the ‘salary sacrifice’ Cycle to Work scheme);
    • Reducing VAT on cycle repairs;
    • Working with the European Union on changes to the VAT Directive that would encourage cycling (e.g. zero-rating cycles);
    • Maintaining its policy of not taxing cycles for the use of the roads.
  • Both national and local authorities should dedicate sufficient resources to smarter choices, recognising that they rely on revenue rather than capital funding.
  • Economics-focused bodies such as Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs), regeneration agencies, developers and retailers should recognise the value of cycling and take action to promote and encourage it.
Download full campaigns briefing: 
Publication Date: 
March 2014

Space for Cycling

Space for Cycling logo
The national Space for Cycling campaign aims to create the conditions where anyone can cycle, anywhere.
Mark Slater's picture

Carmarthenshire cyclists start local campaign group and look to build local support

Do you want to improve cycling locally……meet like-minded individuals…..and make a difference? CTC local cycle campaigners and cycle enthuiasts Phil Snaith and Geoff Rone have set up a forum in Carmarthenshire with the aim of making cycling a safer and more convenient way to travel.

The time to act is now as political momentum has picked up the pace. Cyclists' uphill struggle for better infrastructure and facilities has now changed up a gear and the Active Travel (Wales) Act 2013 has been passed. You now have an opportunity to voice your own opinions and collectively campaign for better cycling for all in Wales.

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olivercw's picture

Jon Snow, CTC President and newscaster, chairs Cycling Scotland Conference

The ninth Cycling Scotland Conference was held at the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome in Glasgow. The conference bought together active travel professionals, campaigners, volunteers, national and local politicians to learn from each other and to network.
Jon Snow CTC President & Chris Oliver CTC Scotland Chairman

Jon Snow, CTC President, made a charismatic chairman of the ninth 2013 Cycling Scotland Conference

In his opening statement, Jon said he'd seen “...more segregated infrastructure in his cab ride from Glasgow station to the Sir Chris Hoy Velodrome conference venue than in all of London!”

Chris Peck's picture

Government predicts cycling will FALL by 2040

While the Get Britain Cycling report calls on Government to aim for 10% of trips by 2025 and 25% of trips by 2050, in the bowels of the Department for Transport, technicians working on the National Transport Model are forecasting that cycling will fall for decades to come.
Cyclists crossing a road

Traffic modelling - the act of forecasting how much additional traffic there will be in future - is a dark art.

Forecasting is tricky: feedback loops and unknown future changes can rapidly upset any firm conclusions about current trajectories.

Roger Geffen's picture

CTC in 3-day talks on delivering PM's "Cycling Revolution"

CTC has had 3 days of discussions with the Department for Transport's cycling policy team about what both they and we hope will be a genuinely "ambitious" Cycling Delivery Plan. But we face clear challenges too.
CTC has had three days of discussions with DfT

Earlier this week (on October 21st to 23rd), CTC hosted 3 days of talks with members of the Department for Transport's cycling policy team at CTC's national office.

These mainly focused on our aspirations for what should be included in the Government's forthcoming 'Cycling Delivery Plan', which will outline how David Cameron's promised 'Cycling Revolution' is to be achieved.

olivercw's picture

What is CTC up to in Scotland

CTC is a UK wide organisation, but at the same time it has a distinctive CTC Scotland 'region' which represents and deals, as best it can, with all the specifically Scottish issues.
Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC) Scotland

One of the big advantages of CTC is that it is a UK wide organisation, but at the same time it has a distinctive CTC Scotland 'region' which represents and deals, as best it can, with all the specific Scottish issues. 

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  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

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