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Re: This made me sad on several levels

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 August 2014 - 5:22pm
It's arguably a fault with the jury system that emotion may play too great a part but the counter argument is that juries somehow reflect the feelings of ordinary people in the face of authority. The reality is that the defence rightly try at every stage of the proceedings to represent their client's interests by having charges dropped, reduced, dealt with by caution or whatever. If the system's working correctly, if when it gets to court, unless something goes wrong like a witness dropping dead, conviction should be almost inevitable because of all the filtering that has gone on before. Unless there's a point of law to be argued, a bit of thespianism may be all that's left, combined with the hope that in any twelve people chosen at random, there may be enough people who will, for whatever reason say NOT GUILTY no matter what the evidence. It's a bit of a wildcard.

There are vested interests here and it won't change much anytime soon, IMO. I get the impression that the govt has decided it's all too expensive to bother with, which is why the enforcement of some offences has collapsed. Spin is cheaper than delivery.

Re: Do I need front panniers for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 5:19pm
If you don't need them, don't get them!

Lots will tell you they spread the load and give you better balance. I ride without them and don't feel unbalanced.

Things in favour:
Balance??
Carry more weight
Make you look like a'proper' tourer

Things against:
Cost (rack and bags about £200ish)
Always fill, so you carry more weight
When going on bus, plane, train, etc far more hassle with manhandling 4 bags
I think my bike is easier to handle without them
Etc, etc

Re: Do I need front panniers for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 5:13pm
If you haven't missed them you don't need them.

Bigger loads might be a bigger tent, more comfortable mat, warmer sleeping bag, more just-in-case spares, extra shoes, walking kit for days off the bike etc. etc.

Decent rack will do 25 kg.

Pete.

Re: Do I need front panniers for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 5:12pm
If having all the stuff on the rear doesn't affect the bike handling, and you have enough room for all your kit, then no, you don't need front panniers. I have camped with all my kit on the back (+ a small bar bag) - on one bike it was a bit whippy but I soon got used to it, while on another I didn't notice any difference in the ride apart from the weight up hills. I suppose that putting some of the load on the front reduces the strain on the back wheel but unless you are pretty heavy yourself it is unlikely to matter.

I think it was the late, great Richard Ballantyne who wrote that panniers rear AND front were just too much baggage. Personally I agree, though I'm sure that lots will not. Have a great time!

PS - where did you go in Scotland in the end?

Re: Do I need front panniers for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 5:11pm
13kg with camping kit, tools, waterproofs, clothing etc is pretty good. Close to what I carry for a summer tour but the longest I've been away is only a month. I tend to organise my load by having front bags carrying very light items such as sleeping bag, then a large saddle bag for clothes etc with the tent carried behind the saddlebag. A bar bag for paperwork completes my set up. I have considered just using rear panniers instead of this, but cannot be bothered - and I don't have any. I am amazed at the amount of stuff some people carry, even just for a weekend away I've met people whose baggage is more than twice your 13kg.

Given this, I'd say stick with what you have.

Re: This made me sad on several levels

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 August 2014 - 5:08pm
Flinders wrote:.............. Likewise, juries ought to be discourage from finding someone innocent just because they approve of them in other ways and don't want them to get a stiff sentence.

Isn't this the whole problem?
When defendent's 'brief'(which are anything but) gets out the violin,and begins the 'of good character,fine upstanding charitable member of the community'speech opinions begin to change in jury member's minds.When in reality the plane bald facts should be adhered to irrespective of anything else IMHO.

The justice system reeks of injustice

Re: Help!

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 August 2014 - 5:07pm
A Top Gear aficionado?

Re: Help!

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 August 2014 - 5:03pm
Absolutely nothing.

Help!

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 August 2014 - 5:00pm
I don't want to perpetuate the ongoing moronic drivers/perfect cyclists argument, as I don't believe it is true, but, can someone please tell me what goes on between the ears of some drivers 'cos I can't work it out. This morning cycling back from shopping expedition, nothing too onerous. Country road single lane, level, some bends, not complicated! Was following a reasonable sized tanker, probably doing 20mph+. Nothing difficult so far? As it was impossible for me, let alone any other vehicle, to overtake I was pootling along between primary and secondary, about 25 yards behind. Car arrives, sits on my tail! then on the horn! I think WTF is the thought that went through my mind. Looked round to see morbidly obese [rude word removed] gesticulating at me to move over, fair nuff! I'm not going anywhere so why not. Car overtook with said drivers matching wife/sister mouthing something in my direction (always wondered how they make cars suspension so good these days?) then promptly slams on his brakes and sits a foot behind the tanker. So, my question is what was going on in there?

Do I need front panniers for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 4:57pm
Hi there. I'm new to touring and did a short 4 day tour in Scotland recently, camping, with 2 back panniers and my tent strapped to the rack. I had loads of extra room for food. I'm about to go on a 6 month tour, and will take pretty much the same stuff with me. I'll also have a big shopping type bag with me to carry panniers on flight with - which I can strap to the rack and put in extra stuff.
Basically - I see that the majority of tourers have front panniers. I can't imagine they all take more stuff with them than me. I weighed all my stuff in at 13kg, then always had about 4L water with me and food.
Are the front panniers for balance? I didn't have any problems with balance with everything on the back - but I am worried that there may be a strain on the bike in the long run?
I don't really want to take front panniers because of the extra weight.
Thanks

Re: This made me sad on several levels

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 August 2014 - 4:38pm
thirdcrank wrote:Flinders wrote: ... Isn't it the judge's job/duty to rebalance the case presented and pull it back to the facts?

In England and Wales, a criminal case is tried on the admissisble evidence. While this should establish some facts, the process seeks to establish whther or not the defendant is guilty. This is really a concept rather than a fact, although once the jury's verdict has been delivered, it's treated as fact.

The judge's role is to ensure that the trial takes place within the rules, especially insofar as they govern what evidence is admissible. The judge has a case management role to try and keep things moving and focused on the job in hand. I suppose this might be described as pulling it back to the facts, but if there's any leeway, the defence has to have the benefit of the doubt. In its final submission, the defence can use all sorts of rhetoric to try to win over the sympathy of the jury or introduce doubts. At the conclusion of the defence case and before the jury retires to consider its verdict, the judge sums up the evidence, drawing particular attention to any crucial evidence from either side and then explains the relevant law. If the defence advances an argument which isn't a defence, the judge must explain that to the jury (and then wait for the appeal in the event of a conviction.)

IMO the word "rebalance" doesn't describe a judge's role.

Agreed, not the right word. maybe 'drag the case back to the judging on the facts and tell the jury to disregard the rhetoric' might be better.
I also worry about victim statements and references to the job of the defendant (when that's not specifically relevant) can, in their different ways, create a system where the same offence may be treated more or less leniently according to the jury's perception of the status of the victim or perpetrator. Someone who murders a tramp with no family should not get a less severe sentence than someone who murders someone with a more fortunate life. Likewise, juries ought to be discourage from finding someone innocent just because they approve of them in other ways and don't want them to get a stiff sentence.

Re: Cycling around Japan

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 4:12pm
I will have in 3 months time. I am off there at end of Sept for 6 weeks.

There is a bit of info on the web, but not nearly as much as for other destinations. I think there are quite a few Japanese tourers, but very few blogging foreigners. Most people seem to be put off by the cost(s).

There have been a couple of posts here in the last year. Seek and ye shall find.

Re: Round the World Tour at 61

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 4:03pm
+2. I agree with the above. If you need to ask us, do you really want to do it. What if we all say NO!!

I always wanted to give up work at 42, no one believed I would do it. They were right, it was 45. Out of a good job and on a plane to India within 3 days.

I had already travelled a lot and met many lost souls endlessly and aimlessly wandering, so I decided I wanted to keep my home ties. I made and still make 2 x3 month trips in the winter. Always home for Christmas and New Year (best time to socialise) and the summer. The idea of cycling round the world or setting off on an indefinite trip has never appealed to me

I mainly travel in Asia because I love the place, the people, the food, the landscape, etc. Also it is pretty cheap. I have been to Oz and NZ a few times as more expensive treats.

Now 61 and off to Japan in a few weeks - this one will cost, but got a bit more cash now.

I am very happy with my life style and don't regret leaving a good job for a more frugal lifestyle, not that I felt I ever lacked anything I really wanted due to a reasonable wadge of savings (as I said this had been planned for many years).

Yes, you can do it. You need to decide if you want to and what you will be losing if you don't and what you will be gaining if you do. I have met many people who love life on the road and as I said, I have also met quite a few who don't.

I am quite a careful sort of chap and always make sure I have a bail of plan, that's probably my advice.

Re: Tour de Manche Mapping (St Malo-Roscoff)

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 2:44pm
simonineaston wrote:Without wishing to get too nerdy about maps & scales... here's 2 small samples of a road I know well in Brittany. Note that several minor lanes clearly visible on the IGN sample are missing from the Michelin. However as I say a bit of common sense works wonders - the missing minor roads are fairly self-evident when you came across them. Fairly, but not always
M.JPG IGN.JPG
I would be happy to take the Michelins, though, in spite of my reservations - it's largely a question of awareness - so long as you know that the dustiest small lanes may not be marked, you can make a judgement, 'specially if you've got a compass with you, to double-check the direction of your intended travel. Have Fun!!

Great example, but there's a couple of things that complicate matters;-) The IGN will show all those little white roads as exactly the same size so actually following one is very difficult because when you get to a junction it's not obvious which road is the 'through' road. You end up with a maze of roads all the same size and personally I find it almost impossible to follow. The 'missing' roads on the Michelin tend to be those not taking you anywhere and those marked will be the obvious 'main' road at junctions with roads that are unmarked (normally;-) Also Michelin is much better at showing the same small villages which are signposted at road level - often the IGN will show a village that's not signposted but miss a village that is (and some villages aren't in the correct place!). Once you get a feel for how Michelin work you'll find them much easier to follow and more accurate overall.

The other interesting thing is that the level of detail on the 1:150,000 Michelin is the same as the 1:200,000! The larger scale merely being a blow up of the smaller! So just buy (for example) the orange 512 and you cover the whole of Brittany - you'll need at least 4 IGN to do the same (or two of the 150,000 Michelin).

Lastly the 1:200,000 Michelin are waterproof and indestructible;-)

And that's why we supply Michelin - not IGN to our customers and use them exclusively on our own tours;-)

Way of the Roses coast to Coast

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 2:40pm
I am planning to do this ride next spring over 3 days using B&Bs. I have never done any multi day rides before which means that I don't really know what to take with me to wear apart from the obvious cycle gear. I don't want to carry anything that I won't use. Any advice?

Re: NCN Route 1: Dover to John o'Groats

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 2:21pm
Richard Fairhurst wrote:Enjoy - it's a great route. I did it all over several holidays and loved most of it, apart from getting lost in Newport. (The missing section there has been fixed since.)

Bear in mind that the Fishguard-Carmarthen bit is hilly - nothing too stratospheric, just the sort of mile-after-mile up-and-down that can sap your energy. Once you're past Carmarthen it's reasonably plain sailing.

There are printable maps available online if you don't want to pay the cost of the printed maps.
Cool, thanks for the advice! I did a similar thing going up the length of England I started at the lizard in Cornwall & it was a "tad" hillier than I was used to

Maps found & downloaded! Cheers!

Re: NCN Route 1: Dover to John o'Groats

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 12:44pm
pete75 wrote:mjr wrote:A grass field? That's better than the sand, gravel and dirt tracks between the Norwich City Council boundary and somewhere near Whitwell:[...]

Looks ok to me. Have ridden many miles on tracks like that and worse on 32mm tyres without problems.
I think you'd want 50mm on much of it. I was running 28 front and 37 rear and it was very slow going, rather dodgy on the steeper downhills and absolutely no fun IMO. The picture doesn't really capture that typical rims will be submerged under sand or gravel at some points. I simply couldn't ride one section and walked off to a nearby near-parallel road, switching back only when the alternative was an uphill drag of A1067 - that section was slightly better, but it deteriorated again.

If the roughstuff fellowship want to use that sort of thing, good luck to them, but why can't it be labelled it as a bridleway or MTB route and not part of the National Cycle Network?

Re: Advice regarding fixed touring base/ support company

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 12:16pm
We stayed at a campsite near Allemond, at the foot of the Croix de Fer, about 4 miles down the valley from Bourg d'Oisans. They had some small on-site chalets, as we didn't want to camp, but plenty were. Friends have stayed further up the valley. There's a B&B called "Chalet Michelle", owned by a British couple, or there are a few places to stay in Bourg itself.

Take a bike with low gears - the Alpe in particular is very steep, as is the very top part of the Galibier.

Re: NCN Route 1: Dover to John o'Groats

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 12:00pm
dakari-mane wrote:Am planning on doing the whole of NCN4 in September. Starting at Fishguard & finishing back in London. Just wish you didn't have to buy so many ruddy maps to cover the whole route (too expensive for an incomplete route so I'm not going to buy any, I'll just will wing it).

Enjoy - it's a great route. I did it all over several holidays and loved most of it, apart from getting lost in Newport. (The missing section there has been fixed since.)

Bear in mind that the Fishguard-Carmarthen bit is hilly - nothing too stratospheric, just the sort of mile-after-mile up-and-down that can sap your energy. Once you're past Carmarthen it's reasonably plain sailing.

There are printable maps available online if you don't want to pay the cost of the printed maps.

Re: Bridge out on Lon Las Cmyru at Portmadog - options?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 August 2014 - 11:45am
Rode this from Chepstow to Holyhead last week. We followed the traffic through in convoy. After the lights we managed to get to the next part on the sustrans 8 route before any cars caught up with us as the lights were in the other direction.
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