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Re: Speeding cyclists on LBC now

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 8:26pm
What speed limits are they talking about. Because, as I understood things Highway Code section 125 defined speed limits and there are no speed limits for cycles (unless there are local byelaws in operation).

So in your everyday 30 mph speed limit, a cycle doing 35 mph is not breaking any laws.

I would imagine there might be other considerations related to safety but those would be called something like "Cycling dangerously".

Have I misunderstood things (quite possible) ?

Ian

Re: Speeding cyclists on LBC now

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 8:22pm
http://app.musicradio.com/lbclondon/on-air/player/

Edit: Live link, won't be much use when the discussion finishes.

First experience on singletrack

CTC Forum - MTB - 20 November 2014 - 6:41pm
I went for a ride in Dorset and had my first experience of singletrack. I fell - spectacularly - at the feet of the Cerne Abbas Giant.
http://www.farawayvisions.com/cerne-abbas-giant-dorset/

Re: Diabetic Feet on Tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 November 2014 - 6:19pm
Ferdinand I'm sorry you have had a poor response for a serious enquiry. I'm not diabetic - but I would have happily recommended sealskinz socks to you. They work. There have been reports of water getting in by running down your leg in very wet conditions, suggested solutions seem to centre about taping the top of the sock to your leg. Haven't had this problem myself, but even if water does get in this way you should certainly be able to dry them out overnight (turn them inside out!) and start the next day with cosy toes. Good luck!

Re: Why do so many people die shovelling snow?

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 6:02pm
thirdcrank wrote:The medical opinion seemed to be that the underlying fitness from decades of cycling had saved me.
I'm surprised your general fitness didn't protect you against angina in the first instance. I don't know much about it, though - my granny and a cousin suffered from angina but they were a bit overweight and not very fit.

Re: Touring Cassette

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 November 2014 - 4:03pm
Unless the cassette-chain is worn out the cheapest way would be to just change the inner chainring.
Put it small-small and measure the gap between the chain and the bottom of the front derailleur cage.
You need 2 mm per tooth reduction.
So a 4 mm gap will let you drop the inner by 2 teeth and an 8 mm gap will let you drop it by 4.

Re: Touring Cassette

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 November 2014 - 3:38pm
I have 44/32/22 x 11-30 on my touring bike but my preference is spinning rather than honking up hills(I am 59).. this might be of use to you http://www.bikecalc.com/gear_inches

Re: Why do so many people die shovelling snow?

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 3:14pm
At last, a topic where I can claim some experience and expertise — I've lived in Canada all my life, have ridden bicycles for 60 years, and worked for a quarter of a century as a physiotherapist with cardiac surgery and rehab patients

The BBC article spells out the reasons why snow shovelling puts so much stress on the heart. I'd add one more factor: usually people don't have a 'warm up' period before shovelling, so their hearts go from resting rate and output to maximum stress in a matter of seconds. I would not go as far as the cardiologist they interviewed, suggesting no one over 55 should shovel snow. Judging by the forecast, I'll be doing a bit of shovelling myself (age 66) before today is over. My recommendations: stay fit (yes, thirdcrank, your heart is undoubtedly stronger because of your decades of cycling, and the angina probably would have started many years sooner if you hadn't stayed active); dress for the weather; start slowly and increase your effort gradually, don't push yourself to absolute maximum effort, and if you've a lot of shovelling to do, take a break now and then and don't overtire yourself. And for goodness sake, go see a doctor at the first episode of chest tightness or pain, or if you feel as if you're getting tired abnormally quickly.

Now to bicycling: almost everything about it is good for the heart — exercise bikes are central to our cardiac rehab program for that very reason. Warm up gradually, don't push to exhaustion, don't 'ride through' any worrisome symptoms if they show up — they're there to warn you about something. (Tsk, tsk, tsk, thirdcrank…)

If you're fit, you can even go hill-climbing in the cold (if that sort of thing makes you happy ), but don't jump on your bike and head straight up a 25% grade at full speed. (Sorry, if I'd been following the threads on grading hills more carefully I might have chosen a better number , but you get the idea.) Again, increase your effort gradually for five or ten minutes before you really start to push.

If you're planning to change your intensity of cycling, checking with your doctor might be wise. But if you're not going to extremes, just get out and ride and enjoy it — your heart will thank you.

Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 November 2014 - 3:06pm
hi Radomir
your route looks great ...I see you have cape wrath included ... (a great trip) ..just to let you know this ferry is run depending on the weather http://www.capewrath.org.uk/

Re: Why do so many people die shovelling snow?

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 2:26pm
I think part of the snow shovelling thing is people doing something they are not used to and often under pressure eg late for work because of the snow . I think it would be foolhardy for somebody who wasn't a regular cyclist to practice their hill climbing in cold weather, especially the extreme cold experienced in parts of the USA in winter. I had my first inklings of heart disease while riding on a very cold day - by UK standards - on quiet roads billiard board flat just north of Doncaster. I was pootling along when I felt a sharp pain in my chest, which persisted a few minutes. I rode through it and thought no more of it. When angina was diagnosed several months later following different symptoms, the cardiologist said that pain was probably when my heart had created its own bypass to some clogging, aggravated by the cold weather. The medical opinion seemed to be that the underlying fitness from decades of cycling had saved me.

Re: Diabetic Feet on Tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 November 2014 - 2:07pm
I've yet to tour and it isn't looking like I'll be able to until next year. I've been type 1 for 34 years.
From my days of commuting ten miles to work and ten miles back in all sorts of weather, I can't remember wet feet ever being a problem. I'd get to work, put on dry sock and work boots and go about my business with no adverse effects other than wrinkly feet if it was bad enough.
The problems may start if you combine wet feet with cold weather. But even then I think it would take some time for any long term issues to surface. Neoprene overshoes might be your best bet and shoes with as little padding as possible will dry out quicker than those with lots of padding.
The best overshoes I've ever used are these... http://www.amazon.co.uk/BBB-HardWear-BW ... +overshoes
Mine are nearing 3 years old and still waterproof and cosy. Water gets down the sides but any overshoe will have that problem.

Why do so many people die shovelling snow?

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 2:05pm
Why do so many people die shovelling snow?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-magazine-monitor-30119410

This article is about shoveling snow but raises issues about cycling in the cold?

Re: Abuse

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 1:43pm
I gently wave onwards, often thanked for idt.

I'l not t=stop as a eesult of this...

Re: Abuse

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 11:44am
I do that now and again: stay in primary in a narrow lane until I've found a safe spot to draw in and let the following motorist overtake. I try to avoid arm-waving (something that the Highway Code discourages anyway) but the brief nod that I give is usually understood. Can't say I've ever had any aggro about this: on the contrary, I'm usually thanked.

Re: Abuse

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 11:36am
Can't say I have any sympathy for her aggression. The cyclist was just being polite in signing her round. If she didn't want to go round (sometimes I don't) for any reason, nobody was forcing her. In her place if I'd said anything later it would have been 'thanks for the wave, but I didn't feel I could get round because.....'

Re: Undertaken - on the pavement...

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 9:27am
Motorists love traffic jams, but they're best when they are stationary...

Re: Abuse

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 9:26am
[XAP]Bob wrote:Mouthful of abuse from a young "lady" today...
"don't you ${expletive}ing well tell me when it's safe to overtake".

I'd merely signalled a safe pass after cresting a hill at the end of a stream of oncoming traffic...
TBH I feel some sympathy towards her (apart from the expletive, which some just can't help adding whatever they are saying). It is really quite irritating to be frantically waved past as some cyclists (and horse riders) do, when they are in the position to see around the hazard - and I (driving) am not. My driving safely is my responsibility, not theirs and I'll wait until I can see it is clear (as for when they actually stop right in the place where they can see through the hazard and then start to direct my movements ).

Re: Wet weather gear

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 9:16am
eileithyia wrote:How long is your shift? Is there no heating facilities / boiler room? Towels? I get wet sometimes and while i have some old cheap cycling kit in my locker i can usually get most stuff dry during in my shift.
We moved up the west of Scotland in October '82 and I cycle-commuted the eight miles to work and back.

We'd left Plymouth with sunny dry weather. The girls were in summer dresses and sandals, and I was cycle-commuting seven miles to work and back in shorts and light tops.

Within a week after moving north, the girls had to have wellies and winter clothing, and I suddenly was faced with being soaked wet through by the time I got to work. I had a locker at work, so I had a change of clothes, and my cycling gear was put over a nearby radiator to dry - including the shoes and socks! I'd drive in on a weekend with fresh shirts and socks etc to get me through the week.

By the time I finished work, I put on my (now bone dry) cycling gear and got soaking wet through going home. Stripping off, my gear went on the storage heater in the hall ready for the "cycle" to be repeated - seemingly endlessly.

This went on until mid December - constant rain and drizzle - to replaced by snow.

Happy days.

Re: Undertaken - on the pavement...

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 8:57am
andy65 wrote:There appears to be a problem with perception. Drivers often see cyclists as something that must be overtaken immediately. It's not just fast or aggressive drivers. I have been passed very dangerously by people driving very slowly, the classic being little old ladies passing on the wrong side of a solid white line on a blind bend on a narrow road. They are clearly not in a hurry and they are not being aggressive, but it doesn't occur to them that if they wait a short amount of time they can pass more safely.

I don't know what causes it and I don't know what can be done to change it. Perhaps there needs to be research into the psychology of road users, to understand how we can overcome things like this. I include cyclists in this because I know that we can also be affected.
I agree the mad/psychotic/lunatic driving manoeuvres I've witnessed,because a driver had to slow down for what amounts to a few seconds,is is truly bizarre and bewildering,the blind overtake being be just one of many.
Just to be rooted to the spot at the next TL .

Re: Undertaken - on the pavement...

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2014 - 8:48am
There appears to be a problem with perception. Drivers often see cyclists as something that must be overtaken immediately. It's not just fast or aggressive drivers. I have been passed very dangerously by people driving very slowly, the classic being little old ladies passing on the wrong side of a solid white line on a blind bend on a narrow road. They are clearly not in a hurry and they are not being aggressive, but it doesn't occur to them that if they wait a short amount of time they can pass more safely.

I don't know what causes it and I don't know what can be done to change it. Perhaps there needs to be research into the psychology of road users, to understand how we can overcome things like this. I include cyclists in this because I know that we can also be affected.
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