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Re: Extra stuff inside bike bag with Easyjet

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 October 2014 - 8:52pm
Flown Easyjet a few times with a bikebox. Extra items in box included helmet & shoes + all parts appertaining to bike such as tools/pump/saddlebag etc.
I have had companions who took just a "cabin bag" and put other clothes and items in their boxes with no problems.
The only time Easyjet has come into contact with the bike is at the checking in desk when they weigh the bike etc.
After that the boxes/bikes usually go through an Xray machine but it's not Easyjet personnel who carry this out.
Upto now the only issue has been CO2 cylinders that have shown up on Xray and been confiscated.
If you are using a "see through" bag then you may have problems at the check-in desk?

My bike & box + bits usually weighs about 24 kgs.

Re: Pushing a bike on a footpath.

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 8:47pm
it would be interesting to enquire of the council if the signs are theirs or not? when I spoke of 2 signs I wasnt thinking of one at either end but the fact there are 2 one on each side of the road at the far end of the lane. I dont think I have seen that before, certainly not for hickville. Unless its a local parish council and some of the councillors live down there....

Re: Pushing a bike on a footpath.

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 8:39pm
Mick F wrote:Yep, I agree too I suppose.
............ the OP was asking about pushing a bike, remember.

Yep, pushing it could be ok.
Just try pushing a car along a footpath.
What's the difference?
Let us just assume that pushing a bike is an act of trespass because it is not included in the normal right of passage down a footpath. That is a purely civil matter, it is not breaking a law. Propelling a motor vehicle down a footpath would also be a trespass but it is not a very good comparison because in the case of motor vehicles it is also a criminal offence.

Re: Pushing a bike on a footpath.

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 8:38pm
Tonyf33 wrote:Woking Cycle group seem to have some sort of application in hand but local government is very very slow from reading, with other applications for other issues well in front (seemingly taking weeks if not months for each)
http://www.wokingcycle.org.uk/muddy-lane/
.

Thanks - I had thought that had been denied ; so can live in hope.

Re: Pushing a bike on a footpath.

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 8:33pm
mercalia wrote:The no entry sign looks phoney. it seems to be on private land. I cant see the council putting up 2 no entry signs one on either side.
I think the no entry is the wrong sign to use?
Virtually all land is private. The council can regulate traffic travelling along any public highway (which this lane is). It is not uncommon to prohibit vehicles from using public footpaths as shortcuts. However, I agree with you that the signs (one at either end of the lane) seem unusual. I would normally expect to see "no vehicles" or "no motor vehicles" signs (maybe with "except for access" plates) if a TRO is in force

Re: Pushing a bike on a footpath.

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 8:33pm
Mick F wrote:A bicycle is a vehicle.

You are not permitted to propel a vehicle along a public footpath.
You can carry it, but not push it, because pushing it is "propelling" it.


I wonder? I would think "propel" would have to be clearly defined in terms of how the vehicle is meant to be used n and not the degree of contact with the ground ( as is implied ) other wise what about if only one wheel just touches? or touches for 1 sec out of 2 lol

Re: Pushing a bike on a footpath.

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 8:31pm
Yep, I agree too I suppose.
............ the OP was asking about pushing a bike, remember.

Yep, pushing it could be ok.
Just try pushing a car along a footpath.
What's the difference?

Re: Visibility: why are do so many riders in black

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 8:26pm
It's all to do with what you do and when and where.
I wear a funny hat and mitts and bright clothing when I go out - like today on a blast of 40miles into the mist and rain and damp using main roads.

However, if I ride into the village maybe half a mile there and half a mile back along the lanes, I'll be wearing normal clothes, no gloves, no helmet, no eyewear, no special shoes, no safety lights.

Re: Pushing a bike on a footpath.

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 8:23pm
To my knowledge you won't find case law to back up the assertion that a bicycle is not a 'usual accompaniment'. I imagine the opinion that it is not a 'usual accompaniment' stems from a bicycle being a carriage and a vehicle. There's no doubt in my mind that it remains an accompaniment whether you wheel it or carry it
I agree with Gaz on that one.

Re: Visibility: why are do so many riders in black

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 8:18pm
Mick F wrote:I dress like a banana with a funny hat, plus wear mitts and have a mirror, plus have "visibility lights".
None of this can do any harm, and if it helps, that's good innit?
It can do harm... by helping to make cycling look like the sort of activity that is so dangerous it requires special protective clothing. We should join forces with walker safety organisations and reject this assault by motoring intersts.

Re: Dog walkers or horseriders?

CTC Forum - MTB - 27 October 2014 - 7:07pm
Hi,
On my last but one trip out on my usual training ground.
Two dogs in the road (single track, national cycle route) they see me and both come towards me barking, one growls at me (farm dogs) as I have dogs and have encountered before I shout loudly and try to pass.
One is behind me and gives up (I am at a walking pace) the other backs down the road about 50 - 70 yards constantly barking I keep shouting at it loudly, backing it into farm entrance, they I try to get away but dog is persistant, he finally gives up and I am on my way again.

If I did not shout at dog they were probably going to bite my heels or they would be under my wheel / bring me off.

I have been chased by one of these dogs several times this year.

The owners are not there as they are farm dogs, they come and go as they please.

What would you do

As I own male large dogs for over twenty years I know what to do but stopping does not make them go away.
I confront them and shout at them as I know the farmer would do the same.

Farm dogs......old blind and bored not working like sheep dog...rat catchers at best.

Re: Dog walkers or horseriders?

CTC Forum - MTB - 27 October 2014 - 6:25pm

Accusing the behaviour of the dog as being aggressive and threatening is just ridiculous - the dog was showing play behaviour (barking is NOT a sign of aggression). I cannot understand quite why you felt threatened by the dog. Your bad language so quickly almost certainly made the situation far worse than it needed to have been. OK, the owner should have held the dog as you passed but I can see how your attitude would get her back up to be uncooperative.

Ian

You are 100% wrong there. That is clear evidence of a dog totally out of control in a public place, and posing a public danger. the cyclist can't advance on their bike without risking hitting the dog and being knocked off their bike. The person with the dog has no business to be in charge a dog at all. There was nothing playful about it's behavior. And of course barking can be a sign of aggression.
Why did the person not put the dog on the lead? Because they had no control over it. QED.

Re: bike back from LA

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 October 2014 - 6:24pm
andrew_s wrote:Tell him that if he wants to leave the bike, he can leave his own bike, then wait to see what he does.
i agree. you have a very strange son.

Re: Visibility: why are do so many riders in black

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 6:23pm
Sagwagon wrote:How long before some insurance scumbag uses it as an excuse in a court case ? M`lud my client complained that the rider was dressed completely in black and was virtually invisible ! You can literally hear them trying it on ! Why give them the chance ?
They've always got that chance. They can just as easily complain that the rider was dressed completely in yellow against the low winter sun. Few do because they don't enjoy being laughed at. M'lud my client complained that the house wasn't painted hi-vis yellow...

Re: Pushing a bike on a footpath.

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 6:17pm
Woking Cycle group seem to have some sort of application in hand but local government is very very slow from reading, with other applications for other issues well in front (seemingly taking weeks if not months for each)
http://www.wokingcycle.org.uk/muddy-lane/
Worst the landowner could do is attempt a civil case for trespass, they'd need your ID for that and I'm sure the police just aren't interested..I'd cycle down it and just ignore the idiots, pushing a bike down it and they still gave you hassle..wow.

Re: Pushing a bike on a footpath.

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 6:00pm
He sounds a bit odd. You may need to be careful.
Being in the right is no good if someone is, well, strange.

Re: Visibility: why are do so many riders in black

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 5:57pm
I never said it was equal responsibility but a cyclist can help themselves and should. We dont live in a perfect world get used to it, you may find in life you have to do things you may not like or agree with, riding in black is your choice, i think its foolish. How long before some insurance scumbag uses it as an excuse in a court case ? M`lud my client complained that the rider was dressed completely in black and was virtually invisible ! You can literally hear them trying it on ! Why give them the chance ? Your hearing is the next best thing to eyes in the back of your head, why would you cover them up ? Doesnt make sense.

Pushing a bike on a footpath.

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 October 2014 - 5:56pm
To get to the RHS gardens at Wisley from London the simplest way of getting under the M25 is Muddy Lane :

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@51.32609 ... vgOjKw!2e0

We cycled this way for many years but gates and No Cycles signs have appeared together with an abusive resident. Since the alternative routes involve long diversions onto even muddier tracks we resorted to pushing but the landowner claims that even this is forbidden.

CTC briefing is that this is a grey area legally but he is probably wrong.

What to do ? offer 20p for any damage to his nettles and advise him to sue if he can show that more damage has been caused ?

Re: Extra stuff inside bike bag with Easyjet

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 October 2014 - 5:51pm
Yes, the regulations (as in the link in my original post and in the page you quoted) clearly say no other stuff allowed inside bike bag.

Yet I know plenty of people would have got away with it. How do you define a bike, does the lock/bottle cage, lights/bike computer, rack, count?

I would like to see a bike in a bag with few extras that weighs 32kg. Hard bike box, fair enough, bag, I am not sure I'd want to ride that.

Edit: i've flown with BA a number of times, of course when you ask them, they say no extras inside bike bag, in practice, nobody cared (I didn't have any additional checked baggage allowance and they could have got me to pay extra..).

Re: Extra stuff inside bike bag with Easyjet

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 October 2014 - 5:40pm
22camels wrote:as far as 32kg, i think it was raised from 23kg in Jan 14 after many complaints that it was too low so not sure where H&S comes in.. anyway if I can only put a bare bike in the bag, all I need is 12 or 13 kg.. I know there are others with fancy mountain bikes and whatnot that might weigh up to 20kg by themselves..
No single item is allowed to be more than 32kg even if your allowance is more than that - that is where H&S comes in, lifting more than that is deemed to be a health hazard or need specialised equipment. If you had, say, 40kg allowance you couldn't have a single 40kg bag, whatever the contents.

According to this page you may put other stuff in with your bike provided you also book a hold bag. From the table:-
Easyjet wrote:1 bag, 1 large sports item
  • Total allowance 2 items @ 52kg total
  • 1 item must be genuine sports equipment as defined
  • You may distribute weight between items as desired

Rick.
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