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Re: commute distance, folder or road bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 6:16pm
I have a road bike which I ride for pleasure. I also have a hybrid which I use for commuting. The hybrid works for me as I can and have fitted mudguards and panniers. The gearing is also a bit better for the hills so I don't get quite so sweaty.

I also prefer the hybrid as I do ride around fairly busy roads on my commute and prefer the handling and control that my Hybrid gives me with its straight bars and more upright riding position over what my road bike would give me.

Re: Cafe & coffee

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 6:15pm
Mick F wrote:People put out milk for hedgehogs ...
A bit off-topic but you should not put out milk for hedgehogs. Lot of reasons why you should not, but mainly it will give them diarrhoea. Of course they will drink it but that does not make it good for them (after all, we eat McDonalds ...).

Ian

Re: commute distance, folder or road bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 5:48pm
Folder or road bike?

I cycled to a client's office a few weeks ago on my Brompton. Their address is in a hilly part of North London and it was an effort getting there on the Brommie, I nearly got off and walked as I cursed its limitations.

The following week I had to do the same journey and as I was setting off I discovered the Brompton had a p*nct*re, no time to fix it I hopped on my road bike. It was a joy; I felt like I was flying.

When I got home I looked up my Strava record for both journeys expecting the road bike to have crushed the Brompton's time but was very surprised there was only a 2 kph average speed difference and a few minutes travel time difference.

Re: Cafe & coffee

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 5:36pm
Mick F wrote::lol:

My point is that cow's milk is consumed by wild animals. The mere fact that the milk may be in a bowl or other container is besides the point.

Birds often tip over milk bottles on the doorstep to get at it. People put out milk for hedgehogs and badgers, and maybe foxes for all I know. No doubt the wild animals and birds couldn't care less which animal the milk is from, but drink it they will.
My point was that it's not a 'natural' food,found outside the cow other than when extracted by humans ,but because we extract it ourselves by making the cow think it's pregnant by artificial means,we then go onto feed it to other animals.
Take the human being out of the equation and animals won't consume cow's milk.
Without the human they wouldn't,because they couldn't,irrespective of whether it's good for them or not!

Re: is bikehike working?

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 4:21pm
works fine with saving as a file and loading via garmin training centre which is not inconvenient just an extra click or two. Pretty big TCX file for my 100 mile Peak Punisher Sportive on Sunday

Re: Lon Las Cymru Holyhead to Chepstow just completed

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 September 2014 - 4:20pm
Time might not be short at that stage, and the ride would be without the gear (would spend two nights at the same campsite in Bangor) which would make for a more pleasant 60 mile round trip ride.

Re: LLC and Wales Questions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 September 2014 - 4:19pm
This is for the 2014 show: http://www.whitehousecampsite.co.uk/Roy ... _Show.html

I imagine it will be similar for 2015?

So they somewhat book out a week long period, which would more than likely conflict with my dates of travel. Especially since I'll have 2-days in MidWales and the other campsite I looked at also only does multi-night stays during the Show.

Re: Long distance MTB routes in the UK?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 September 2014 - 4:06pm
james-o wrote:http://selfsupporteduk.net/


My, my, thats some serious inspiration. Think I'll have a crack at a C2C + lake district in November, then Scotland in the spring. New bike is on its way so time to get some frame bags sewn together >:)

Re: Cafe & coffee

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 3:47pm
LondonBikeCommuter wrote:al_yrpal wrote:Its a great way to get back at these unwelcome tax avoiding scars on our high streets and railway stations

The way that these companies are able to avoid Tax is by posting a loss or much much reduced profits. Seems to me that your antics are helping them.

BTW Even the thought of Gregs makes me feel ill.


They actually do it by claiming they are having to pay part of their own operations in lower tax places outrageous sums for raw materials, like coffee beans, or the right to use logos, etc. They then make huge profits in those low-tax places (where often they may only have one office and a couple of employees) and pay their tax there instead. There's a specific name for it, I can't remember what it is (though I can think of some for myself).

Aha, just remembered, it's called 'transfer pricing'. But not by me.

Re: You Are A Bunch of Frauds

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 3:39pm
I try to push up my speeds for a coupe of reasons- one, because I have only a limited time to cycle and need to lose a bit more weight, two, because it's more interesting if I can get further in the time, it gives me access to a wider range of routes and destinations.
I still potter when I fee like it, am under the weather, or just feeling idle.

Re: commute distance, folder or road bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 3:32pm
Thanks for all the replies. I currently cycle 3 minutes to a tram station and take a tram (8 minutes) to a train station (I can also cycle 15 minutes to the train station but I already got a travel card (London zone 3,4) which covers the tram), then ride a train for 15 minutes, after that it's a 40 minute (6.6 mile) cycling to work. Yes, I know I still should try it out the whole route myself. Thinking getting a Decathlon rode bike, cheap compared with big brands but reviewed very well. At least I can use it for weekend.

Re: You Are A Bunch of Frauds

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 2:48pm
I started riding Touring bikes for years and have moved into the road racing and TT world. Now outside racing I mainly do day rides on my racing bike a Giant TCR. When I first rode it I found it very strange , but now find it quite comfortable and am happy to do a 200 k Audax on it . I find it strange getting back on my Audax and touring bikes with the very upright position. I think most of the speed difference is tyres , a little is extra drag due to the upright position and some speed is lost with less stiff setup , Weight is probably not a major factor unless doing lots of hills and starting and stopping

Re: commute distance, folder or road bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 2:46pm
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
15 miles each way will take about 3 hours a day out of your time,
That's somewhat a matter of perspective. Thotwielder has to get to work somehow. When s/he gets used to the commute, it may not take much longer than what s/he currently does, or than taking bus and train, or something.

Including time solely for the purpose of exercise (i.e. commuting by bicycle replaces some time that would be spent in the gym) riding a bike looks even better.

Thinking of it as taking time out of one's day, makes it all too easy to also think it would be better spent doing something else. IMO, that kind of thinking is one reason that so many people drive everywhere. They think of cycling as 'extra time' to get somewhere.

I'll second the notion of something with mudguards. And if you plan to commute in winter, maybe somethign that will take winter tyres, as well.

Thotwielder, do you have any alternatives? Can you take the bus to the train if it's icy?

Get used to what you are doing before you extend your commute. Personally, I would prefer a full sized bike. 15 miles is a lot to do every day, twice a day. It takes a lot of dedication to do. People do it, and it's entirely feasible, but it can also get to be a slog, even if you're really keen. So, my advice: give a few weeks on the folder, then decide what you want to do. Can you borrow a bike or from someone to try or even a couple of different bikes?

Re: commute distance, folder or road bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 2:31pm
Riding the folder isn't going to be 2 and a bit times a hard per mile as a road bike so the longer commute will be a bit more effort. Though, as Tony says, it may be quicker than faffing around catching the train.

Nobody can tell whether you will enjoy your commute. I am sure that a 15 mile commute is some people's idea of heaven and others' idea of purgatory. Some things you have to try before you know if you'll like them.

I agree with Tony that you don't want to be carrying stuff on your back. Bear in mind that the things that make an ideal road racing bike are not necessarily the same things that make a great commuting bike. I would want something that you could fit a rack and mudguards to.

Bear in mind if you have only been cycle commuting for a week that it does get easier as your fitness improves and you get used to spending time in the saddle. You shouldn't be as tired by the same commute in a month's time

Re: is bikehike working?

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 2:18pm
Dunno if it's any help but I used "EasyGPS" with my old garmin that connected via serial port to usb linky thing.

Re: commute distance, folder or road bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 12:55pm
Hi,
15 miles each way will take about 3 hours a day out of your time, alowing for clothes changing cooling down (20 mins in summer) and the maintanance will be on top.
You will get fit and if you were to keep that up for a year this would be all the training you would need for an End To End attempt

The road bike will be better by vertue of the fact that higher speeds will be obtained by better bike fit and a sleeker body pose.

I would try a few days a week and you can always drop back on your old system.
You dont need a pure road bike, a MTB which already has all the gears and capability for mudgaurds and a rack for pannier/s could be a wise choice with slicks / semi slicks, just make sure any bike you buy either has IGH (internal geared hub e.g. brompton) Or Cassette hub dont go the 5 -6 - 7 speed old design free wheel new, unless a second hand bike is free to tryout.
A second hand cassette MTB will do for a cheap tryout but ditch the knobbly tires for some cheap slicks.
The worlds your oyster

Re: French Alps - recommended places...?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 September 2014 - 12:37pm
I've stayed here in Bourg d'Oisans a couple of times
http://www.camping-colporteur.com/index_gb.htm
very nice and handy for a lot of climbs.

Re: French Alps - recommended places...?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 September 2014 - 12:32pm
Another vote for Bourg D'Oisans here. The place is a mecca for cyclists with iconic Tour de France climbs all around. We went 2 years ago and camped near Allemond, just down the valley from Bourg. We did Lauteret/Galibier, Alpe d'Huez, Col d'Ornon, Croix de Fer/ Glandon. There's plenty of others too.

Re: commute distance, folder or road bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 September 2014 - 12:15pm
A lot depends on the roads. if it's main roads, then the constant buzz of traffic can be annoying, but if you can find a less trafficked route then the commute can be very pleasant. I used to commute 21 miles each way to work, from just south of Nottingham to the centre of Leicester. I had to do about 5 miles on the A46 dual carriageway but the first 8 miles were on country lanes, which made up for it. Winter brings the problems of icy roads and darkness which can be overcome, but can make the commute less pleasant. I used to cycle 10 miles to a station in the winter and catch a train to work.

Developing the fitness to do a long commute takes time, so you may need to build up to it, perhaps start off doing it one or 2 days a week and build up from there.

A road bike will probably be quicker, but you need to think how you are going to carry your kit. I wouldn't recommend a rucksack for that distance. I've always used a saddlebag or panniers. But can a road bike take panniers? Depends on the bike.
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