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Re: Signs - Minutes or Mileage

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 April 2015 - 1:48pm
Just like the M1, no one would ever follow a numbered route to go somewhere...

Re: 24 miles: car slower than cycling?

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 April 2015 - 1:44pm
24 miles is a fairly long journey for comparison.

10 (similar mixed conditions) took me about an hour when I first did it, but within a few months it was within 10 minutes of the car time (25 mins) - and not on a race bike by any stretch...

At that point the difference is marked - because even on "just time" you come out aged (accounting for some exercise for the motorist and a shower for the cyclist). And on "just cost" you're miles ahead.
The variability in journey is also much smaller.

Re: An answer to potholes

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 April 2015 - 1:42pm
LollyKat wrote::shock:



Think we've just found the perpetrator [emoji55]

Re: Any point in reporting a v v close pass?

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 April 2015 - 1:38pm
Report it, but expect nothing.

Worth building a picture if the vehicle is repeatedly reported.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 April 2015 - 1:37pm
Have one filled with nitro morse for the recalcitrant motorist? (Not sensible by the way, the nam will et the plastic and damage the children - but it's fun to imagine)

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 April 2015 - 1:35pm
admin wrote:They have already started looking behind for approaching cars (and now they will often start pedalling very hard to get our speed up, if they think a close pass is imminent).

In which case make one of them the rear gunner with a water pistol. If they see a close pass coming up, eye them up and lift the water pistol and I bet the car will swing wide and remember to go wide next time. If not, a shot across the bows. Wielded by an adult it might cause conflict but kids are kids and playing with water pistols is what kids do. Supersoakers etc have a good range and have the advantage they are made up of lots of hi-viz colours so not easy to not see.

Re: I think I found the perfect touring bike but...

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 April 2015 - 1:24pm
Its much easier to criticise a bike using the wrong information than it is to make an accurate assesment using incomplete information.
If they are full-size Vee brakes, they get top marks from me for that.
I don't see the point of external bottom bracket bearings on a tourer, but its widely done, and the gearing is similar to what i would choose.
The geometry table is incomplete; I have to guess at the fork offset, hopefully its in the 50-odd mm range. There is a 2 degree range in head angle across the sizes, and they don't tell me the offset is different to compensate, so I'm assuming the same offset is used for every size. I don't like that, I think ideal steering can only be achieved with the proper offset for the actual head angle, but again, its widely done. If I'm right, the small bikes will have different steering characteristics than the big bike.
The chainstays are short for a proper load-lugging tourer, and the wheelbase see-saws, so that the 58 is longer than the 64, and the 54 is longer than the 56. It seems to me that the wheelbase drops each time they steepen the head angle; top tube length has been chosen to show a smooth progression across the sizes, and wheelbase is the prisoner of the variable head angle. Head tubes are all pretty short.

Can you beat it for £600? Maybe not. But if you look at the price difference between Spa's Ti tourer and Ti roughstuff bike, as far as I know that price difference is made up of STI lever and chainset price.....a Spa steel tourer for less than £800 with bar end levers and 104BCD chainset is an interesting comparison with the Fuji.

Re: Singlewheel trailers - experiences and modifications

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 April 2015 - 1:02pm
ah I think I was confusing u with theDaveB who has the yakalike , sorry, I was wondering why get both too many DaveX's here, just as well u are not theDaveP

Re: Now i,m starting to realise:/

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 April 2015 - 1:01pm
I think a lot of space-saving can be made without investing in all the expensive ultra-lightweight gear, partly with a practice run or two, but also by really thinking about each item that you're taking, even those that "hardly weigh anything". Touring in Europe, I definitely wouldn't carry things like spare brake pads, and a lot of other 'just in case' items can be bought if necessary. Even books - most bookshops in France will have a small English language section (if that's the kind of books you're talking about). Tent pegs - make sure you aren't taking 5 spare pegs. Toiletries can really add up too.

My first tour was 2 weeks in Brittany, mostly camping, and I just about managed with two rear panniers, a small frame bag for tools, with the tent and mat in a dry-bag on top of the rack. It wasn't lightweight by any means and it was sometimes hard finding room for the food (although easier when it was cold and raining as I was wearing most of the clothes

Re: Now i,m starting to realise:/

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 April 2015 - 12:55pm
foxyrider wrote:FarOeuf wrote:cooking gear (plus food to cook) takes up a lot of space. eat cold food, and you'll save a lot of space.
Doesn't have to and why should the OP eat cold food? I take a kettle for making a brew and hot water food so i don't take pans - i usually eat in local hostelries/restaurants. Packing stuff inside the kettle saves a lot of space and maybe not taking a full set of pans would save a bit of weight. Pick up the food at the campsite or take a walk into the town.

taking cooking gear takes more space than not taking cooking gear, incontrovertable fact. the OP does not 'have to' eat cold food, but is clearly looking to save a bit of space. when you don't have much money to spend on lightweight stuff, compromises must be made.

UK or Ireland this year?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 April 2015 - 12:45pm
Hi,
as every year we are in process of deciding where will we be traveling this year.
A few facts:
- we have round about 4 weeks
- we are bound to travel middle July to middle August
- I think round about 1000/1200 miles
- we start from South Germany (by Plane we can fly to London)

One of the options we were evaluating was to fly to London (because we have some people there which could store the bike cardboxes).
From there either go west, cross from Wales to Ireland, take a tour of ireland, and then cross back from Dublin and go back to London.
But if you have suggestions of other possible tours, even completely different, we are open.
Other options would be switzerland/France (all the way east to West across to Brest) or East Europe (Hungary/Romania).

Taking a Train here and there if it gets too long is also fine.

I have not a clue at all what to expect in UK/Ireland in regards to
- climate (is it really raining that much? We do not like much rain, I mean from time to time is fine, rain multiple days is not much fun)
- roads (traffic, scenery)
- costs for eating and rooms/camping (is it really that expensive)
- how "interesting" is the scenery?

I get the feeling that UK/Ireland is someway much less frequented than let's say France.
France would be the easies logistically, but I have a feeling it would be someway boring.

Regarding our interests:
- Nature and scenery
- not much in cities or architecture or history
- the less people the better
- we like smaller roads with beatiful scenery, animals and so
- did I mention nature?

For our background, we have some photos of our Tours on our page to get an Idea: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Withthis ... 9666345700

Do you have any advice?
Any Suggestion on possible tours?
I tried to look for some tour reports but did not find much.
Thanks a lot !!!!
manuel

Re: Solo Etiquette

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 April 2015 - 12:43pm
motty wrote:If the locals are speaking welsh, move to another pub
Only Welsh? it does limit your touring a bit if you only tour where the pub customers speak English
One of the advantages I find of touring in non English speaking areas is that you are not distracted by conversations which you just can't help overhearing when dining alone.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 April 2015 - 12:41pm
Give them each an Air Zound and ear plugs and/or water pistol to blast drivers that pass too close. Make dealing with them fun and active rather than scary and passive.

Re: Now i,m starting to realise:/

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 April 2015 - 12:39pm
FarOeuf wrote:cooking gear (plus food to cook) takes up a lot of space. eat cold food, and you'll save a lot of space.
Doesn't have to and why should the OP eat cold food? I take a kettle for making a brew and hot water food so i don't take pans - i usually eat in local hostelries/restaurants. Packing stuff inside the kettle saves a lot of space and maybe not taking a full set of pans would save a bit of weight. Pick up the food at the campsite or take a walk into the town.

Re: Solo Etiquette

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 April 2015 - 12:25pm
I like a beer with my dinner but hey, if you don't drink no one will think it weird if you have a soft drink in a pub or restaurant

You are stopping at some veritable metropolii so finding a variety of eating options shouldn't be a problem!

Enjoy your visit

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 April 2015 - 12:14pm
I've had a tears a couple of times from Mini V when she didn't want to ride the bike (she will be 9 in June). My worry in that kind of situation would be putting them off cycling. If you are ok with them accompanied on their own bikes, they may be happier that way. Certainly Mini V prefers to ride her own bike these days, at least for anything under 5 miles.

Something else that might help, is having them look around, and *tell* you when a car is coming. For one thing, that will engage them in doing something, and for another, it may help reduce the close passes if there is a child face staring back at the driver.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 April 2015 - 12:09pm
Nope, nothing to do with wanting to walk with friends: most of their friends get taken to school by car, and we say "hello" to some friends as we cycle past anyway. The problem is simply that they're now getting scared of near passes by motor vehicles. As I say, we've been cycling to school happily since reception, and they're now in year 5. In a year and a bit they'll be able to walk on their own round the corner to secondary school, but we still have a year and a term of primary school (the other side of the busy A27, and more than a mile away) to go.

They love cycling, and don't really want to have to walk every day (they do on some days, anyway, for various logistical reasons, so they know what it's like to walk).

It might be that we've been unlucky in the last week or so, and that things calm down again. But I hate the idea that they're frightened on the back. They've just started pedalling really hard whenever a car comes up behind, to try to keep our speed up to discourage overtaking. We've talked about the risks, and how small they are, but it doesn't help with the actual experience. Even I get scared with some of the near-misses we get.

Re: 24 miles: car slower than cycling?

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 April 2015 - 11:59am
Mark1978 wrote:
Although I'm not sure time can be easily quantified in such a way.


The thing that prompted this post is my belief that car ownership and usage (you have to use it to make it pay at all) is disastrous for people on low incomes. When the Wonga controversy was in full swing, many people were quoted as having borrowed a pay day loan "to fix the car" or "pay a motoring fine". Obesity and health are also low pay issues AFAIK. The car for many people is a false friend.

For me cycling to work would mean leaving the house at 6am to get to work for 8.30am, which is fine. But the return journey would mean getting home at 7.30pm (as opposed to 5.45pm) which is not fine at all


I agree, very long commutes are different (and maybe simply impossible for many people). The problem as I see it though is that the marginal cost (and ease) of driving traps people - the obesity and the MOT costs come later. When you look at the larger picture, that second hand car isn't such a bright choice.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 April 2015 - 11:48am
9, its about that age when I was only allowed to walk a certain distance near the school with the eldest. The youngest walked on his own and with friends from a younger age. It could be that they want to walk with friends and are beginning to feel left out. It could be that they are scared. But at 9 they will have an opinion and I suggest you talk to them about it and find out what they want.
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