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Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 1:16pm
Pedestrians in Norway and Sweden seem to be 'militant' as you described it. They step out into traffic and expect it to stop for them, even when they are crossing against the lights. Newcomers to Oslo and Gothenburg complain about it regularly, as much as British drivers complain about cyclists jumping red lights.

How to convince others cycle touring is safe?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 1:09pm
If anyone has seen my other post (Rotterdam > Istanbul - Which bike?) I'm currently in the process of planning a big tour, leaving my home in Leeds and cycling to Istanbul via as many countries as it's feasible to pass through.

This trip is a little mad - but aren't all adventures supposed to be? I've no previous cycle touring or camping experience and I've not really even been on a bike for about 8 years. But for me, that's where the madness ends.

Yes it's a big challenge, however, I'm confident I can achieve it and know that it'll be one hell of a life experience. My personal concerns are only with coping with life on a bike, finding places to sleep and my directional sense which can sometimes leave a lot to be desired.

Currently my main issue is trying to convince others (especially over protective parents - only child, but I am 30 years old!) that this tour is safe and there are very limited risks. They've instead suggested another option which is to inter-rail around Europe... but how boring is that? City to city travel, not experiencing anything of a country.

Have any of you had similar issues trying to convince loved ones that large scale cycle touring and some wild camping / couchsurfing / staying with random farmers, is low risk and easily achieved in mainland Europe?

Are there any statistics out there showing how many cycle tourers there are across Europe?

Should I reduce the trip down to something more manageable / acceptable? Maybe Rotterdam > Madrid / Palermo.

My issue is not that people can stop me going, but my level of enjoyment on the tour knowing that people back home are constantly worried about my safety.

Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 12:58pm
Vorpal wrote:What's wrong with that, and why should we restrict pedestrian freedom to prevent it?
I'm all in favour of the pendulum swinging in favour of the pedestrian, but just wonder how long pedestrians would continue to use the Highway Code advice, look right look left etc. , once they had discovered the driverless cars would stop to allow them to cross safely.

Re: Panniers as airline baggage

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 12:55pm
kuba wrote:I had a problem with plastic bags in the past, as they rip fairly easily, and you may lose bits in transport. Especially if you factor in transit between flights. It would have to be one hell of a bin liner not to rip with 40 kg in it!

Not sure if you clicked on the eBay link above but a zipped bag that will hold it all and serve you a lifetime is £1.99 there, well worth the money. Or try Pundland, I got mine there. And once you land in Bishkek with it, you'll look like a local!

Yes. Thanks. I did look.
I just wondered if the handles would be up to the weight?
I can see the bag holding linen type stuff but maybe not all my gear plus tent?
Matt

Re: Tipper crash in Bath

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 12:03pm
From vorpal's Daily Mail link:

Another local resident described the tragedy as an ‘accident waiting to happen’, claiming he had warned the authorities that lorries had been a problem on the narrow thoroughfare as long ago as last April.

He said the problem had been exacerbated by construction work at the primary school.

Minutes from a council meeting in April show he asked: ‘Who will be held accountable if a child is killed or seriously injured?’ (My emphasis)

That's a phrase we've discussed before. There'll be some frantic backside-covering taking place now. I fancy it won't be long before there's some effective traffic-calming at the top of this hill, rather than the pathetic measures at the bottom. (eg big kerbs, separated by a narrow gap only passable by cars and light vans.

Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 11:54am
Ron wrote:Would there need to be changes in law to restrict pedestrian freedom before these driverless cars come in to general use?
It would appear that militant pedestrians could cross roads where and when they liked and the driverless cars would stop to let them cross safely.

Like present day Glasgow then. I'm still amazed despite decades living here at peds who walk across busy roads without looking at traffic and just trust that nobody will hit them.

Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 11:29am
Why can't we all just get along

Re: Pannier Security on Tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 11:27am
My Arran panniers have handles. There is usually something on top of the rack too overhanging the tops of the panniers. I loop the bungies holding the top stuff through the handles with the hooks out of sight underneath the top stuff. I always leave my bike loaded in full public view securely locked. If I really wanted to make things difficult for a thief I could add in a cheap Decathlon digital cable lock through those handles securing them to the rack too.

No thief is going to want the hassle of trying to remove a pannier that is complicatedly secured like this. The thief wont know if there is anything worthwhile pinching anyway. The biggest risk might be someone with a sharp knife slashing the bungees and pinching your tent.

My bar bag, containing all valuables is easy to unhook with the Klickfix, it goes with me everywhere. I have a shoulder strap for it.

Al

Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 11:22am
Ron wrote:Would there need to be changes in law to restrict pedestrian freedom before these driverless cars come in to general use?
It would appear that militant pedestrians could cross roads where and when they liked and the driverless cars would stop to let them cross safely.
What's wrong with that, and why should we restrict pedestrian freedom to prevent it?

Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 11:18am
Would there need to be changes in law to restrict pedestrian freedom before these driverless cars come in to general use?
It would appear that militant pedestrians could cross roads where and when they liked and the driverless cars would stop to let them cross safely.

Re: Rotterdam > Istanbul - Which bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 11:17am
The Eastway looks like really good value for money. The only thing I would be concerned about (maybe) is the gearing.

The best touring set up for gears is on the Fuji, which has gear inches ranging from 20.6 to 117.8

The worst is the Eastway, which has gear inches ranging from 28.7 to 122.7

The others fall in between at 21.9 and 23.6 for the lowest gear inches.

I would personally prefer the lower gearing, but the gearing on the Eastway would be fine for many people. The other aspects of the Eastway are nice enough that if it suited me, I might buy it anyway, and swap out the casette, if I found the gearing to be too high.

edited to add: the worst that happens if the gearing is too high for you (with loaded bike) is that you walk up a few hills. Not everyone thinks that a big deal, anyway. But if fitness is factor, low gearing will help you.

Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 10:59am
fluffybunnyuk wrote:lol why would you take a pod at 7mph when you can ride a rusty piece of steel (or nasty cheap aluminium) with 2 wheels significantly faster?
It sounds like reinventing the c5...
But think of the effort of forcing this contraption along at 7mph
Mentioning the C5 - I remember visiting a cycle show a few years ago where the same genius had invented a bicycle with very small wheels. Something like a child's scooter with a drive train and pedals. I asked the enthusiastic young person how it would deal with a pothole

Re: Rotterdam > Istanbul - Which bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 10:53am
Thanks Vorpal!

So there's two more, the one mentioned above:

Dawes Galaxy AL 2014 Touring Bike
http://www.evanscycles.com/products/daw ... e-ec050874

and another option I've found at EBC, discounted and in my size. It doesn't have a back rack so I'd have to buy that:

Eastway ST 1.0 Steel
http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... ring-bikes

Re: Is touring becoming a thing of the past?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 10:42am
It's possible to tour on pretty well anything - a lot of people in the 50's and 60's had one decent bike which was used for racing and with a saddle bag pressed into service as a tourer - most road bikes came with mudguard eyes.
When I returned to cycling after many years the first bike I bought was a tourer which I also used for Audax.
Several bikes later I still have the tourer which does it's job admirably but only gets use for a multi day tour - which means not every year.
So I'd guess - as others have suggested its a niche product. And as others suggest there are other types of machine which will suit the purpose with minor modifications.
Most audax bikes will take a rack so I think they are quite suitable as a light tourer.

Re: Tipper crash in Bath

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 10:41am
mark a. wrote:The Institute of Advanced Motorists also advise (at least they did a few years ago) the old "gears are for go, brakes are for slow" rule. Using the gears to slow down means you're using wrenching the clutch, unless you're double-declutching / rev-matching / heel-toeing, which most people don't know how to do. Brake pads are cheaper to replace than a clutch. There's also the issue of doing too many things at once, so the IAM technique means you've got hands on the steering wheel and one foot on the brake, not having to juggle gear levers, steering wheel, clutch and brake (and accelerator if rev-matching).

The IAM also wants you in the most suitable gear at all times. Most of the time these two rules align: brake to the desired speed, release the brake, then change down to the correct gear. The rules don't quite match on steep downhills, where you also want to be in a low gear - here IIRC they recommend that you can brake and change gear at the same time. Once you're in the low gear you're sorted.

My knowledge only applies to cars. I have no idea how HGVs do it, so relevance to this horrible crash is limited. I'm just replying to the side-topic of modern driving techniques and standards.Yes.
The method is to use the brakes to slow .......... NOT the engine and gearbox.

We have a Fiat 500. Two cylinders, 875cc Turbo. Goes like a rocket!
One thing I've found when driving it, there is little or no engine braking available. We live on the side of a steep valley and we need to brake far more than we ever did in other cars.

Also, near here, the main road goes from a short stretch of 40mph to 30mph down a slight hill. In all the other cars, if you take your foot off the gas as you approach the 40 limit and allow the car to slow down gradually, you go into the 40 at 40 and as you reach the 30, you're doing 30. Simple, but takes practice and no brakes required.

With the 500, I have to brake. Even with my foot off the gas at 40 through the 40, I'd still be doing 35 or more at the 30, so I need to brake. Changing down into 3rd doesn't help, whereas in the 1.6 16v Clio we (still) have, I can do the whole thing in 5th gear and not need the brakes at all.

Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 10:37am
lol why would you take a pod at 7mph when you can ride a rusty piece of steel (or nasty cheap aluminium) with 2 wheels significantly faster?
It sounds like reinventing the c5...

Re: Is touring becoming a thing of the past?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 10:28am
It really needs a marketing boost, a change of image.

I'd rather it didnt. Its nice on the road meeting the occasional cycle-tourist. What i avoid like the plague is traditional tourist places (i live in one) or organised tours on organised routes. If there were loads more cycle tourism I wouldnt get near passes from swaying caravans anymore

Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 10:23am
pwa wrote:Worry ye not! Driverless vehicles stop when they sense that there is insufficient room to pass safely. They take no chances. On a busy route I would expect one to spend most of its time motionless.
7mph is a bit optimistic then

Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 10:22am
Worry ye not! Driverless vehicles stop when they sense that there is insufficient room to pass safely. They take no chances. On a busy route I would expect one to spend most of its time motionless.

Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 10:17am
Maybe I have missed something or there is something on another thread but I read an article in "The Times" recently describing proposed trials for driverless vehicles.
One of these schemes was for a "Pod" with a speed of 7mph to be trialled in Milton Keynes. It was envisaged that the "Pod" would use the cycle paths
I know Milton Keynes was built with an extensive cycle network but I wonder if the paths are wide enough to allow these vehicles to pass each other - or cyclists using the path.
How would priority be established?
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