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Re: lycra cycling shorts on tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 May 2015 - 11:33am
I sometimes get chafing even with padded shorts so going without is a definate no-no! On tour i generally take bib shorts for long day comfort, lycra shorts for hot days and baggies with a seperate padded liner for more casual days and sightseeing.

Personal hygiene is a key element after a sweaty day riding - first thing i do at any overnight (after putting up the tent!) is head to the showers where clothing can be rinsed out too. I generally find kit will dry overnight but if not there are nearly always facilities at the campsites i use although in a decade of serious touring i've never had to resort to driers.

Re: Ten Miles a Day

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 11:30am
Mmmm interesting to see its not just me that suffers with this.

I always enjoy the ride when I get out, but its so much easier to sit at home and do nothing much

I have however just ordered a new bike, am hoping this will give me a bit of incentive.

Mind you if its raining or the road is still wet I will not want to get the new shiny toy grubby........ perhaps this wasn't such a good idea.

Re: travel insurance?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 May 2015 - 11:27am
As per recent thread. I got bronze cover from sports direct UK. £40 for the year and covers long trips up to 3 months I think.

Re: 24 miles: car slower than cycling?

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 10:05am
horizon wrote:mercalia wrote:bad comparison, try a motor bike or even a moped.....

The point about the 24 miles and the car on mixed roads (not London rush hour) was that even under these favourable conditions a car requires more time if you factor in costs. A moped or motor bike wouldn't be any better. And a car could of course carry more people, thus cutting the costs. In heavy urban traffic it's well known that a bike (motorized or not) will be quicker. Quite why anyone drives in urban conditions I don't know - I presume that there is another leg to their journey which is quicker and they are wearing smart clothes.
This has been an interesting thread. When I was traveling to work in the Netherlands I used the train in combination with a folding bike. In the train I did my own stuff such as writing travelogues for my website. Thus my time spent traveling was either personally productive (45 mins writing in the train) and/or good for my health (4 x 10 mins cycling per day).

We're unusual here in that we walk our 18 month old to his creche and bring him home by bike. We benefit from the light exercise each day as does our child, there is no need for us to go to the gym. Everyone else seems to use their car - one couple walk home from work to pick up the car and then get their child from the creche by car (a ten minute walk away).

One day when there is no more oil our great/grand/children will ask us why we wasted so many of the earth's resources.

Re: Cycle Touring Festival - May 2015 - Lancashire

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 May 2015 - 10:04am
thayer19 wrote:Just wondering how the festival went? Didn't get a ticket myself but was tempted to, be interesting to hear people's views on it.....

It was a great event, friendly and informative. There was no "hard sell" as some detractors claimed would be, it was really all about the cycling and meeting other/prospective tourers. A wide variety of bikes, tandem, recumbant etc.. All ages, seriously from the young to the "wish I was as fit as you now let alone in your 70+" some people had travelled from abroad, one lady cycled from Ireland to get there. The talks were great, I didn't go to a lot of the talks as I picked out the ones I was interested in but feedback from everyone else that they really enjoyed it!

The surroundings were great, even the cement factory chimney in the distance seemed kind of right, beautiful river/weir with it's resident heron. Plenty of facilities and the staff at the Hall were really helpful and welcoming!

Thanks to Laura, her husband and the rest of the volunteers for a great weekend, their effort was really apreciated!

I have had a busy week at work, but I will be putting a full write up of the event on my blog at the weekend.

Re: A Sad Day for Google Maps

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 May 2015 - 9:43am
yeah, I've been clicking 'revert to classic google maps' for some time now, and feared this day. Guess will have to get used to it. I'm not an IT expert so not sure but the new google maps looks like one of those higher bandwidth modern sites which are always slower than classic websites.. On the other hand, it's good to see terrain view is back in the new google maps as this was my main reason for reverting to classic in the first place. The other thing the new google maps has is an elevation profile when you do cycling directions, that was not there in the classic version as far as I could tell. Then again, I would not use google for serious cycle route planning.

Re: University Project (Charging Rucksack Concept)

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 9:35am
khain wrote:I'd be interested to see if a wind-powered battery charger would be any use on a bike. It would obviously be low output but the advantage over a dynamo is that the drag would decrease to negligible levels when climbing. The problem is obviously that you would need very small rotors but it might be possible to use several on the down tube. I don't know, just an idea.

But with a hub dynamo the drag is reduced the slower you go too. The wind-powered generator would not be as effective in a tailwind, whereas the hub dynamo would work at the same rate as with a headwind. In addition the hub dynamo has electrical drag when in use and slight magnetic drag when not in use but otherwise the bearings create as much drag as any front hub would. The wind generator would add aerodynamic drag plus drag from another set of bearings plus the weight of the generator, a suitably robust mounting and rotor protection.

On the plus side, the wind generator would also work whilst you slept. But then again you could turn your bike over, fit a couple of stiff sheets of plastic to the spokes on your front wheel and turn it into a windmill generating power as you sleep.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 9:34am
On a vaguely related note I wonder how much children's perception of the dangers of cycling are informed by the impression they get from adults, including (but not limited to) the adults they ride with. Aren't their opinions often merely our own or others' repeated back to us?

Admin, I remembered a post of yours from another thread (viewtopic.php?f=45&t=33250&p=789511&hilit=children#p789511) that surprised me a little at the time for the suggestion that children wouldn't be permitted to cycle along lanes until they reached adulthood:
admin wrote:Part of the problem with taking children on road bike rides (we have 8-year-old twins who are accomplished cyclists) is the lack of places to take them. Note that I'm talking about "road" cycling, not MTB riding.

I'm reasonably happy riding amongst motor vehicles on my own, I have experience of the things that can go wrong and trust my instinct to get myself out of danger, but I don't trust motor vehicles around my children. I know that statistically it's safe, but that doesn't diminish the strong fear of seeing my own child being run over. So we only go cycling with trailer bikes, or riding on the pavements illegally and inefficiently to one of the few motor-traffic-free cycleways. No chance of taking them on their own bikes to see the lovely lanes of West Sussex, sadly. Perhaps when they're 18 we'll feel more comfortable riding with them there?
Is it possible that your risk aversion is influencing your children's perceptions of the dangers of cycling?

Re: A Sad Day for Google Maps

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 May 2015 - 9:30am
I have always found the new Google Maps very slow to load (and it still is for me). Even 3rd party sites that use Google are slow loading.

Ian

Re: Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

CTC Forum - MTB - 8 May 2015 - 9:14am
tempsperdu wrote:She seemed oblivious to the fact the she was walking on a cycle path and took umbridge that I was there almost stationary so tried to shove me off as she walked past.
She shouldn't do that (I'd be tempted to report the assault to help get split cycleway/footways) but did you ring a bell or say hello? And I'm increasingly of the opinion that hi-viz helps dehumanise us so people feel they can hit us like they might a vehicle that mounted a path

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 9:09am
Walking on the pavement inevitably involves some crossing of roads, similarly cycling on the road inevitably involves some junctions...

The point being that was massively overestimate the risk in one case, and ignore it in the other - when actually they are comparable.

In *this* case the correct decision is being made in terms of family behaviour and stress. Whatever the stats say there is a perception of risk which is hard to shake - particularly when half of the 'industry' seems hell bent on telling everyone how dangerous it is...

Re: Bikes on Luton Airport Shuttle

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 May 2015 - 9:09am
I'm afraid I've only been to Luton with bike arriving under my own power, as it is close enough to ride. But since no one has answered, I did have a look at the rules/policies, and according to those it is unclear. They have some general rules about being safe on the bus and not inconveniencing others. Although you'd have a good argument that you have plane-prepared luggage, but having been on those buses, it really wouldn't be very easy, unless the bus were rather empty of other people. So they might invoke the inconvenience aspect to say no. Maybe there is some way you can ask them.

It would be safest and surely wouldn't be a huge inconvenience to bag the bike at the terminal, it is not as though you are boxing it.

Re: A Sad Day for Google Maps

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 May 2015 - 9:09am
maxglide wrote:It looks like Google have finally put to death Classic Maps. This makes a great deal of sense: Develop a terrific product, then - ignoring almost unanimous negative user feedback - utterly wreck it. Well done Google, this is a 'classic'.

Good luck with the petitions. Google's track record is all about "no U-turns".

Happily I have found an alternative which is faster than Google Classic Maps was, and much faster than New Google Maps is. It has a fixed left route planning menu like Google maps used to have.

It is http://www.openrouteservice.org/

The main difference with Google maps is that you have to enter way points in the left hand menu manually and place them in the right order, rather than simply clicking on the route to add a way point with Google maps. Once you have added the way point in the left menu you can drag it round the map as you please. I have got used to this very quickly. It might sound a bit time consuming but the time I spend looking at the map to find the name of a way point and adding it to the menu, is easily compensated by the fact that the map itself is much faster. Zooming in and out works quickly even on low spec hardware.

The plan a cycle route option seems quite good, at least for the routes I have tried planning here in Norway. It is great to be rid of Google maps.

Note openrouteservice is a mapping service and does not seem to offer satellite images nor Street View like functionality. If you are planning a cycle tour in Norway and want to look at satellite images I can recommend http://kart.finn.no

Re: Old Trafford to Wembley Stadium

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 May 2015 - 9:00am
I suggest you use this site to plan your route http://cycle.travel/

A Sad Day for Google Maps

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 May 2015 - 8:53am
It looks like Google have finally put to death Classic Maps. This makes a great deal of sense: Develop a terrific product, then - ignoring almost unanimous negative user feedback - utterly wreck it. Well done Google, this is a 'classic'.

If you give a hoot, there's a petition:
https://www.change.org/p/larry-page-ceo ... oogle-maps

More about it here, too:
http://techforluddites.com/google-is-ge ... -for-good/

Re: Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

CTC Forum - MTB - 8 May 2015 - 8:49am
Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

This seems to work both ways.
I apparently startled a 'lady' pedestrian yesterday after cycling towards her for some distance wearing hiviz.
She seemed oblivious to the fact the she was walking on a cycle path and took umbridge that I was there
almost stationary so tried to shove me off as she walked past.
There would have been plenty of room if she and her partner had walked in file but abreast just no room and giving way to
an almost stationary bike seemed too much.
She wasn't even very burly.

Hey ho.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 8:42am
TonyR wrote:buryman wrote:The statistics would look rather different if quoted as per passenger hour rather than km.

We're talking about a fixed journey here, from home to school so per km is appropriate unless you think the OP takes a long circuitous route to school on the bike so the journey takes the same time as it would to walk there directly.
I think this is one of the major problems with such comparative safety statistics - it is difficult to get meaningful comparison measures. I think you can make a good case for per person hours and a good case for per km as well as probably many other measures. And the underlying problem is that the two groups are in pretty different situations facing different (different to a debatable degree) risks - although from a common source (i.e. motor vehicles the primary cause, but pedestrians on pavements or crossing the road face different risks than cyclists moving along a road).

Bit like comparing apples and bananas.

Ian

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 7:29am
TonyR wrote:The fat commuter wrote:TonyR wrote:Safety? Statistically they are at much greater risk from motor traffic on the pavement than on a bike on the road and that's before injuries and deaths from trips and falls are considered.
Can we see these stats please.

I know of a few cyclists who have been injured, some severely, after connecting with another road user. I haven't heard of any pedestrians that have been injured, even slightly, having been knocked over on the pavement. I think that the number of pedestrians using the pavement is far higher than cyclists (certainly around here it is) too.

RRCGB2013. Fatalities per bn journey person km 2003-12. Cyclists 27. Pedestrians 31.
Sorry to be picky here but you stated 'on the pavement'. The above stats are pedestrians in general - which can be people crossing the road.

Now, if I look at it that way then I hear of more people being killed and injured in Sheffield as pedestrians than as cyclists. In the last five years I can think of four pedestrian deaths and many pedestrian injuries within two miles of my house. However, from the reports of these deaths they could have been avoided by the pedestrians acting differently.

A child walking to school under supervision or with proper training is unlikely to be injured. What the problem around here is that many pedestrians will simply walk into the path of the traffic - we have a high student population and they seem to have a death wish.

Thinking back though, there was a really sad incident close to our house where a car did mount the pavement and severely injure two young girls about ten years back.

If you use the required amount of care and attention as a pedestrian then the likelihood of you being injured is low. If you take the required amount of care and attention as a cyclist then the likelihood of you being injured is also low. However, the perception that I get is that as a cyclist, because you actually share the road with other vehicles, you are more at mercy to the actions of other drivers than as a pedestrian.

Hope that makes sense.

For what it's worth, I think the OP has made the right decision. I made a similar decision for myself a while back. I can either cycle two and a half miles to work or the long way which is almost eight miles. The eight mile route I feel far safer than on the short route. I am more likely to get pedestrians walking into my path, drivers cutting across me, close passes and aggressive drivers on the short route than the long one. I initially did the long route for the extra time in the saddle - now I do it because it's far more pleasurable.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 7:13am
buryman wrote:The statistics would look rather different if quoted as per passenger hour rather than km.

We're talking about a fixed journey here, from home to school so per km is appropriate unless you think the OP takes a long circuitous route to school on the bike so the journey takes the same time as it would to walk there directly.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 7:00am
buryman wrote:The statistics would look rather different if quoted as per passenger hour rather than km.
Yes, but most people travel a distance, not a time.

For transport then distance is the appropriate measure. For a leisure activity it is time...
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