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Re: Seeing the screen?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2015 - 4:34pm
Great suggestions thanks. I'll certainly have a little play around with brightness and look at negative colours!

Re: Ferry travel

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2015 - 3:55pm
When I've done Dover-Calais in the car we've always been put on the next ferry even though our booking was actually for one a couple of hours later (I'd allowed extra time to travel that up to now hasn't been needed). Is it the same with a bike (or even on foot)? I've only been across once with a bike in recent years but that was with an organised trip and there were about 30 of us.

Rick.

Re: Bicycle tickets on regional and local German trains

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2015 - 3:22pm
Thanks. It looks like I need a bike ticket for North-Rhine Westphalia but possibly not in Rheinland Platz. Apparently tickets are a bit cheaper fron an automat than fron a ticket office but you have to know what you are after.

EDIT: If I stay within the VRS transport association then a bike ticket is covered by buying a second adult ticket in the 1b/2a price band, which is 2.80 Euro, whereas a regional bike ticket for North-Rhine Westphalia 4.70 Euro.

Re: Ferry travel

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2015 - 3:16pm
I've rolled up at some excruciatingly close times to sailing, to get on a Brittany Ferries vessel... they'll always let you on, if it's just you and a bike. If you already have a ticket, then you just keep pedalling until someone actually stands in your way. If not, then allow a minimum of 10 minutes to buy a ticket... Not that I'm recommending this way of travel, you understand!

Re: Scotland in 2 weeks

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2015 - 3:11pm
Just note that the Winchburgh tunnel is closed on the railway line outside Edinburgh so all trains are either running from Linlithgow on to the Fife line and then into Edinburgh or there is a replacement bus service (they are electrifying the line and hence they have to lower the level of the tunnel). Trains from Edinburgh to Glasgow are affected also. Plus there are roadworks on our motorways at the same time (our school holidays start at the beginning of July so they think that it is a good time for this work). The tunnel work runs until 26th July. This may not affect you directly but it might affect you indirectly. If you plan to use the train check for up-to-date information.

Llandudno guest house

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2015 - 3:06pm
Anyone know of a Cyclist Friendly guest house in Llandudno. We need safe, covered bike storage over night. Most hotels/guest houses don't have parking space or even bike space. (we don't need car parking)

Re: Bicycle tickets on regional and local German trains

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2015 - 2:38pm
It certainly does vary from place to place, of course its easy to just ask if you are at a ticket office or buying from the conductor. The bike ticket for 5€ is for a whole day - useful to know if you are hopping trains.

Re: Help settle an argument

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2015 - 2:38pm
sonoftherocks wrote:....and what if the driver hadn't beeped?
This idiot of a cyclist would've carried on presumably oblivious to his poor road craft. At least we can hope he will learn from this.
Far too much focus in this discussion on the need or otherwise for the car driver to beep. It's just a completely human reaction to blatant stupidity on the road.

I've just returned from a 45 mile ride,in that short 3hour span of time I was overtaken closely(within 500mm) twice by vehicles.
One I happened to catch up up at the next TL and asked if he did that all the time,his reply was "you don't pay road tax" .
I informed him I did but I won't repeat here what else I told him.
I was also overtaken on bridge by two cars(one closely following the other) who gave me plenty of room going more over the other side of the road than our side,but couldn't see over the brow of the bridge if anything was come the other way,I know they couldn't see for a fact,as I drive that way on a regular basis.
I was also overtaken on blind right hand bend by a woman in a new Mini against a solid white line,she was well over the other side of the road and totally blind,I know she was driving totally blind because I couldn't see around the bend and I was in secondary position on my own side.
She had a child in a child seat in the back.
All this happened on one 45mile ride on a lovely sunny day.
Every one of those drivers saw me clearly,and every one of them took a chance with either their own lives or someone else's,not just mine.
The driving standards,lack spacial awareness,downright stupidity and willingness to take such chances frankly astounds me in the extreme,so much so that I no longer think if,but when ....

That ride is by no means exceptional,what is exceptional,is when I come in from a ride without such things happening .

Re: Scotland in 2 weeks

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2015 - 2:36pm
khain wrote:There is a rough track and some byroad between Tyndrum and Rannoch Moor which is probably the easiest part of the WHW, however I still found it pretty rough going with panniers. All the parts from Loch Lomond to Tyndrum will be really rough going on a bike. I also don't think the path between Glencoe and Kinlochleven over the Devil's Staircase is possible on a loaded bike. It was tough enough on foot! There are alternative byroads for much of this part though. Between Kinlochleven and Fort William I'm not sure. Some of it was very rough and steep, other parts ok. The Rannoch Moor part before Glencoe was quite boggy so probably difficult on a bike. You might get a shock at how rough and boggy paths in Scotland can be - even on foot they're hard going!
Hmm, it sounds difficult. Are there any parts which you would recommend, as scenic and easy enough for cycling? How about Tyndrum to Kingshouse, and Kinlochmore to Fort William? These two fragments look doable. I don't mind pushing my bike for some time if necessary, but not for the whole day or two, then it doesn't make much sense.

khain wrote:If traffic bothers you it might be better taking an alternative route through the central Highlands, which is also lovely and more cycle friendly. Use the NCN routes and byroads then take a left turn after Dalwhinnie to Fort William.
I'm not sure which road you mean, could you write some more details?

khain wrote:Some more photos from a Scottish cycle tour I did. https://www.flickr.com/photos/61002072@N00
Thanks! So nice!

andrew_s wrote:To see what such tracks are actually like, use cycle.travel/map to plan a route that uses the track, then right-click and "find photos". To plan a route, click to set start, click to set end, then drag and drop to adjust.
What a great link, thanks!!!

Re: can't you read? .. 4 seconds well used

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2015 - 2:21pm
TonyR wrote:Its a particular problem in London where the bus lane times chop and change, even on the same bus lane, so you have to continually look out for the signs if you want to use them rather than concentrate on driving. It would be a lot easier if they just adopted a standard time for all of them. There's a similar problem with speed limits in other places chopping and changing all the time. It used to be that it was either national limit in the countryside or 30mph in a built up area but now it can be 20, 30, 40, 50 or national speed limit in both built up areas or countryside and they can flip along the same bit of road. Again you need to continually look out for the signs rather than concentrating on the road and then remember what it was until the next sign.

the suspicion is that the bus lanes are used as a revenue source.

I was caught in a bus lane on a Sunday a couple of weeks ago by a camera. I had stopped at the red light, the lane I was in was marked to turn right only, and to the left beyond 20 metres of bus lane was the straight ahead lane. So I skipped across the bus lane and got snapped by a camera. The camera in question generates hundreds of thousands in revenue for the council.

I didn't hold up any buses I was using some empty road to get into the correct lane rather than have to 'negotiate' when the lights changed.

Another bus lane down the road might be a Monday-Friday bus lane, and you can happily drive in it, find cars parked in it and whatever, and clog up the lane for buses carrying passengers and not be fined a penny, because it's arbitrarily Monday-Friday only

With dual carriageways you can have the same problem, in London they will be 30mph, 40mph or 50mph, so the most prudent thing is to brake to 30mph in the event of a speed camera, just in case you have somehow not spotted the recent change even if you are 95% sure that you are in a 50mph. Perhaps they should paint the speed limit on the road as well, to stop this epidemic of unnecessary braking.

Re: can't you read? .. 4 seconds well used

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2015 - 2:15pm
brynpoeth wrote:Many many years ago I was driving in a bus lane in London, not sure why, maybe I thought it was allowed.

A motorcycle policeman pulled me over and shouted: "Can't you read? That is a bus lane, can't [sic] drive there mate! Get aaht of it!"

It took four seconds and I think he did just the right thing, he did not treat me with unnecessary "respect" or try to give me therapy.

This was a formative experience for me, h elped to make me a fan of traffic law enforcement.


Don't see why that would work. Chances of getting caught by the same guy a second time is very small. So if you are someone who drives in bus lanes because you think it's ok to do so, then police encounter isn't going to change your mind.

An automated fine from a camera system will focus the mind much more readily. Rather than a guaranteed £65 fine, I'd take the dressing down any day.

Re: Reasons to take cycling tools on the road....

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2015 - 1:47pm
I've generally found more use for my tools, helping other people than on my own bike.

Over the winter, I had a chain break, but I didn't have my chain tool with, so popped into the closest bike shop and bought one and a quick link. I've changed inner tubes on the road once in the last year. I've helped other people with punctures, twice, and fixed the brakes on a neighbor boy's bike after he almost crashed into me coming down from a local mountain biking path.

Re: Bicycle tickets on regional and local German trains

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2015 - 1:39pm
Basically it seems to depend on where your service is, some services are free, others you pay 5 euros, and there are local restrictions.
https://www.bahn.de/p/view/service/fahr ... kehr.shtml
https://www.bahn.de/p/view/service/fahr ... ahme.shtml
For example, the term S-bahn in Stuttgart (this means the u-bahn in other cities and vice versa, so the S-bahn are the underground trains and the u-bahn are trams). Certainly in Stuttgart bikes are free on the S-bahn so long as you don't take them at rush hour. You would have to look at the regulations for the state that you are visiting.

Re: Reasons to take cycling tools on the road....

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2015 - 1:31pm
2, For the pleasant sound of them rattling and jingling about in your saddle bag.

Re: Help settle an argument

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2015 - 1:29pm
danhopgood wrote:A quick trawl through the Highway Code:
Rule 103 - need to signal intention to overtake
Rule 67 - cyclist not aware of traffic behind
Rule 160 - need to keep to the left unless overtaking
Rule 162 - should check before overtaking no-one is overtaking you
Rule 163 - overtake only when it's safe to do so
Rule 167 Do not overtake where you may come into conflict with other road users - such as a traffic island
A hoot of the horn is quite in order.
but you forgot
112: The horn. Use only while your vehicle is moving and you need to warn other road users of your presence. Never sound your horn aggressively
Again, it is not a cyclist punishment tool nor a means of registering dissatisfaction.
Some of the more conciliatory sections of the Highway Code get overlooked in the rush to attribute 'blame' but the advice is sound.
147: Be considerate. Be careful of and considerate towards all types of road users, especially those requiring extra care (see Rule 204).
-try to be understanding if other road users cause problems; they may be inexperienced or not know the area well.
be patient; remember that anyone can make a mistake.
-do not allow yourself to become agitated or involved if someone is behaving badly on the road. This will only make the situation worse. Pull over, calm down and, when you feel relaxed, continue your journey.
-slow down and hold back if a road user pulls out into your path at a junction. Allow them to get clear. Do not over-react by driving too close behind to intimidate them.

Open Source Maps with cycle routes

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2015 - 1:18pm
I'm trying to find a Garmin img file of Open Source Maps with cycle maps (NCN, National Byway, etc) city cycle routes and contours.
I've tried https://sites.google.com/site/openstree ... incycleuk/ but that doesn't have contours.
I believe that the TalkyToaster one doesn't have cycle routes on it.
There's a wiki how to make one from the available constituent parts but I'm not sure I understand it.

Someone somewhere must have made one.

Re: can't you read? .. 4 seconds well used

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2015 - 1:14pm
Psamathe wrote:I think society has changed. In my younger days, being stopped and given "a talking to" would have made sure I took a lot more care in future probably in a far broader context than the incident I might have been stopped for. These days it would often be seen as having got away with it and/or that the Police really don't bother and used as a signal that you can behave in such a manner with impunity.

It's hard to say what does and doesn't work, but society has changed. The first time I was stopped by the police was going through a 'speed gun' trap on a motorbike in a 30 zone. I saw the cop with the 'gun' way off and eased off the throttle, at the end of the trap I was pulled over and advised that though they were taking no further action I had been doing 32mph and I should be aware of the limit. At that time I was unimpressed that I should have been pulled over for doing 32 in a 30 at all, and it was a time when the 30mph limit was routinely ignored.

Nowadays I routinely do 30 in a 30 but I think this is years of speed education and the fact that society expects and tolerates 30 in a 30 far more than they did back in 1987, it was not the copper's little talking to that changed my behaviour. Of course routinely doing 30 in a 30 on the cycle would be good!

Re: Help settle an argument

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2015 - 1:11pm
AlanJ wrote:Such hatred of drivers is not healthy. Funnily enough you are the mirror image of that which you hate
Nobody here hates drivers. The vast majority of us on here are drivers and understand the difficulties and considerations involved in correctly controlling a motor vehicle on the road. Sadly, the same cannot be said of the average driver with regards to the needs and safety of cyclists.

Without in any way exonerating the cyclist from his bad cycling, we can condemn the inappropriate use of the horn. The law is clear that the horn is to be used only to alert other road users of your presence. It is not there to vent rage or teach errant cyclists a lesson; to use it in such a manner is illegal.

I'd go further and say that, as with horses, it is rarely appropriate to use a horn when dealing with a cyclist, even where such use would be legal and acceptable when dealing with another car. It runs the risk of causing further danger through startling the person on the bike who may then swerve or fall. Sounding a horn at a cyclist really ought to be a last resort to prevent an imminent collision and there are usually things we as responsible drivers can do to prevent a situation escalating that far

Re: can't you read? .. 4 seconds well used

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2015 - 12:48pm
IMO, being aware of bus lanes is just part of a wider problem with lane markings and signs more generally. Most people who have driven in an unfamiliar area will have experienced realising that there's a big queue in the other lane and it's not because a new branch of Ikea is opening. There's no signal available to you to indicate "I am not a selfish roadhog. I'm a stranger around here who's strayed into the wrong lane. Please be gentle with me."

There are various reasons for the "wrong lane" problem. One is that locals have worked out that the officially correct lane is not the most expeditious or convenient. Often, arrows on the road don't reflect the length of the queues which may hide them and I can point to examples of overhead signs contradicting lane arrows.

I often mutter between clenched teeth that the signs are brilliant, just so long as you don't need them and I think that in many cases, if there is any sort of quality check, it's only a second opinion from somebody familiar with the area, rather than a total stranger.

Re: Help settle an argument

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2015 - 12:31pm
A quick trawl through the Highway Code:

Rule 103 - need to signal intention to overtake
Rule 67 - cyclist not aware of traffic behind
Rule 160 - need to keep to the left unless overtaking
Rule 162 - should check before overtaking no-one is overtaking you
Rule 163 - overtake only when it's safe to do so
Rule 167 Do not overtake where you may come into conflict with other road users - such as a traffic island

A hoot of the horn is quite in order.
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