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Re: Commuting lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 19 January 2016 - 8:50pm
The only person I've known in the last 20+ years that owned dynamo powered lights is a Dane with a bike they brought over with them. The lights only worked when moving. What is the situation with hubs like those linked to at rose bikes in Germany? Do the sorts of lights you'd use with them stay on when I stopped for a period of time? Do front and rear lights work off just one front hub? I take it you have wires connecting them. Anyone got any photos or links to photos to show the connections, especially those to transfer electricity from the turning hub to the frame of the bike and to the lights. TBH the last dynamo I've tried was a bottle one running off the rim or tyre.

Re: Commuting lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 19 January 2016 - 8:36pm
[XAP]Bob wrote:Swapping out the wheel is almost exactly the same - just an easy snap connection to disconnect first, which is quicker than the QR...
I should have said - I was talking about swapping the dynohub from one wheel to another - i.e. back to the wheel-building exercise.

I used to have a dynohub on a bike I rode back in the 1970s - IIRC it needed a screwdriver or spanner to make the connections, but of course that was a long time ago. Also I had the problem of the lights going out when I stopped at traffic lights etc. Anyway, when the bike in question was written off in an accident, I didn't bother to rescue the dynohub: I'd already made up my mind it wasn't my favourite technology. OK things may have changed since.

However, I must admit that battery lamps in the 1970s were pretty awful. Who else remembers the Ever-Ready front and rear lights: like these monstrosities?

Switzerland, St. Moritz to Martina

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 January 2016 - 8:16pm
We're planning a tour for 10 people, riding from St. Moritz to Bolzano IT.
We're roadies, and can ride Hwy 27 in the Inn valley if we must, but prefer "B" roads and paved paths.
We'll be on small wheels-- 406 x 1.5-- so the much used gravel "trekking" paths are not an option.
I've inquired with some tour operators, Swiss tourism, and Graubunden cycle tourism.
They've got a ton of stellar mountain biking and accommodations, but not much for roadies.
Anyone got advice?
First hand knowledge about the routes?
Or whom I should ask?
(Once we get up the switchies to Nauders the Austrians and Italians do a great job of paved alternatives. It's just the Swiss that make it mysterious.)

Re: Logistics/timing Pacific Coast Route

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 January 2016 - 8:08pm
September's a good bet: Pacific Coast Hwy tourist traffic should be down, but still a factor. Adventure Cycling's Pacific Coast Route is of course the most popular, but how much oceanside cycling can one person stand? After countless miles of, albeit majestic, pine forests and rugged Pacific shores, consider an inland meander. It's up to you, of course, but Oregon and Calif. both show their "real" sides once you get over the Pacific Coast ranges-- just a thought-- hundreds of miles of varied ranching, farming, logging. You can always take a day to high-tail it back to the coast if you must.
In central CA you might think about Hwy 25, which runs from Gilroy to San Miquel through the San Andreas earthquake fault. Seriously. Past Pinnacles National Monument. Not desert but ranches in the middle of Nowhere. Good local wine and even a few really good places to eat.
Back out the coast in SoCal cause the beach "scenery" is especially attractive.
And stop by my shop in San Clemente to say Hi. We're right on PCH at North Beach. Where, BTW, you can always put your bike on the train for San Diego if you're feeling burt out on bike touring by then.
Oh, but do visit Tijauana at least. Mexico and the Baja Coast is worth the visit and the whole drug-war thing is pretty much over. Ensenada is cool and the food (and Margaritas) are worth it.

Re: Lightset on ebay, thought I'd share

CTC Forum - On the road - 19 January 2016 - 7:11pm
MikeF wrote:Tonyf33 wrote: I'm not sure where the 3000LUX came from as even BBB don't mention it on their own website!
The packaging on the ebay link.
Screen shot 2016-01-19 at 17.31.26.png
lol, I can't even see it in your pic but the figure is laughable anyway, if I get around 30 Lux at 10 metres with one light I'll be happy

Re: Best way to the Alps

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 January 2016 - 6:57pm
Mike Sales wrote: I just drew a straight line from Boulogne to Geneva and more or less followed it on the yellow roads. Don't worry about planning, just let serendipity help .

My approach too. Dieppe's a nice crossing, It's worth cycling south or north of Paris (Or jump on a train to pass through it), otherwise drawing a line on a map and staying to the minor roads is an excellent approach,

Re: Hotel in Bilbao at start of Atlantic route

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 January 2016 - 6:44pm
it's 90 minutes on the train from santander, and the ferry from portsmouth to santander does accept bicycles, at bicycle rates, so you might be better off going to santander thence bilbao. i accept the trike on the train is trickier than a two-wheeled machine, but iguess that's still a lot cheaper than paying for a car. and flying is impossible with a trike, obvs.
European Bike Express might be able to help? I've found them to be very good indeed.

Re: Are unclassified roads getting much muddier

CTC Forum - On the road - 19 January 2016 - 6:14pm
There were indeed 4x4 tractors 50yrs ago but they weren't very common were they?
When tractors did come out of a field the mud was carried by something like a 10" wide tyre. The norm for tyres now must be double that.
Perhaps the biggest difference is that in those days when you went to the pub at night you'd have taken a hell of a ribbing for leaving a mess on the road. If it were still there the next day you'd probably get a visit from the village Bobby too.
I still remember the 'lengthsman' made his living from milking 12 cows and looking after a section of road between 2 villages.

Re: Commuting lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 19 January 2016 - 6:10pm
661-Pete wrote:It's the wheel build issue that stops me going the hub route, too: I have no skill in wheel building and anyway it makes swapping out a wheel complicated.
Swapping out the wheel is almost exactly the same - just an easy snap connection to disconnect first, which is quicker than the QR...

I have no wheel building skill either - I decided to teach myself, and laced a wheel and started to put tension on the spokes.....
Then decided I couldn't spare the time, so my lbs charged me £10 to true the wheel... Bargain!

Re: Are unclassified roads getting much muddier

CTC Forum - On the road - 19 January 2016 - 5:59pm
And council tax hasn't increased for 6 years. Why the complaints??
Rail fares have an inflation busting annual increase.

Re: Lightset on ebay, thought I'd share

CTC Forum - On the road - 19 January 2016 - 5:46pm
Tonyf33 wrote: I'm not sure where the 3000LUX came from as even BBB don't mention it on their own website!
The packaging on the ebay link.
Screen shot 2016-01-19 at 17.31.26.png

Re: Logistics/timing Pacific Coast Route

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 January 2016 - 5:29pm
I did Portland to San Francisco 20 years ago in July. It was very pleasant. A couple of sections were busy but not at all bad, especially if you are intelligent about picking the time of day.

I drove the Big Sur road last spring and certainly would not want to do it over a weekend.

Re: Is it my road position?

CTC Forum - On the road - 19 January 2016 - 5:26pm
Well, what a surprise

Had something very similar a while ago, white van, wrong gear, then he missed his change. He was not best impressed when I shouted, 'Its in there somewhere, you [rude word removed]' was quite funny though

Re: Logistics/timing Pacific Coast Route

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 January 2016 - 4:58pm
I think the coast is worth doing. The scenery is amazing. The coastal roads can carry a fair amount of traffic, though. I would avoid weekends and peak times.

Besides, the redwoods, I think Crater Lake is a worthwhile detour, though it can be snowy up there much of the year. Late summer is a good time to be there, though other times can be okay, as well. Check their website, if you are thinking of going.

Re: Logistics/timing Pacific Coast Route

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 January 2016 - 4:51pm
A few things:

In Washington, you need to decide on whether or not you want to ride through Olympic National Park. It is heavily forested (think tunnel of trees) and all the good bits are off-route and up hills. The other option is along the Hood Canel where you get views but ride on a narrow highway. Here is a journal of my ride from Bellingham, WA (north of Seattle) down to south of Portland, Oregon. I decided to take the Hood Canal.

In Oregon, there are several tunnels along the coast highway. Bring lights.

Don't miss the Coastal redwoods near the Oregon-California border. Plan to spend a day (or more) hiking among the trees.

Highway 1 north of San Francisco is also used by trucks to deliver goods to coastal towns. Ride with a rear view mirror and pull off the (shoulderless) road when they are coming up on you. Here is my journal of a ride from Ft. Bragg down to Gualala on Highway 1.

Here is a guide to riding from San Feancisco to Los Angeles that I wrote.

It is a great ride. Have fun!

Re: Recommend (or sell!) me a touring frame (disc 700c)

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 January 2016 - 4:46pm
Si wrote:breakwellmz wrote:This sort of thing?-

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/231277328320? ... EBIDX%3AIT

Looks interesting but looks like it's not got lower rider mounts on the fork. Not a total deal breaker but very much a preference on a tourer for me.
Also the frame sizing on bikes like this always gives me some concern as it has a sloping top tube but I didn't see an equivalent to figure on it.

I bought one `frame only` and fitted a Trek fork to it (V brakes back and front) Can you get disc brake adapters?
I can forward dimensions off of mine if anyone wants them.

Re: Are unclassified roads getting much muddier

CTC Forum - On the road - 19 January 2016 - 4:39pm
Some of us have lived in the same place and used the same roads for 30+years ............and even the lane on which we live has seen terrible deterioration.

They ain't cleaning the roads, they ain't maintaining the roads, and they ain't clearing out ditches and drainage.
They used to, but they ain't now.

Re: Hotel in Bilbao at start of Atlantic route

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 January 2016 - 4:28pm
I used the Hotel Bilbi a couple of years ago. The area it's in is not the smartest, but I felt safe enough coming and going, and it's just a short walk down to the river, and across the river to the old town. Anyway, for your purposes, the thing that the Bilbi has going for it is a lock up garage just across the road, which is where I stored my bike and which would be ideal for a trike. My first choice would be Hotel Bilbao Jardines but, while I was able to park my bike in one of the store rooms downstairs, I'm not sure they could accommodate a trike.

Don't underestimate the time it's going to take you getting from the ferry port to Bilbao. You might consider crossing the river via the
Vizcaya Bridge at Portugalete and then just following the river.

Enjoy yourself! Bilbao is one of my favourite cities.

Re: Are unclassified roads getting much muddier

CTC Forum - On the road - 19 January 2016 - 4:17pm
Paulatic wrote:Fifty year ago driving onto a grass verge was frowned upon. Now it's an everyday event.
Fifty year ago there were no 4x4 tractors in exceptionally wet times as of recent you couldn't have got onto the fields and off again. You had to wait for drier conditions.
There were also no phones distracting drivers, I'm sure a lot of the deep ruts seen just on the side of the Tarmac are caused by running off the road while looking at a text.
4x4 tractors started to become available for small farmers as war surplus GP vehicles (jeeps) a little over 50 years ago. 4x4 recreational vehicles also started out from these, admittedly were less prevalent than now. However a lot of the wash-off of mud onto roads is not caused (around here at least) by vehicles, but by the fact that gates and gaps in downhill corners allow mud to wash off the fields onto the lower roads. Whilst less ditch digging may increase this effect, it would always have happened in heavy rain once the soil is waterlogged.

I suspect that 50 years ago there would have been many fewer living in the countryside without experience of/ relatives involved in agriculture and that the mud was just as prevalent in similar conditions then, just less moaned about by people conditioned to 'clean' urban environments and roads.

Re: Recommend (or sell!) me a touring frame (disc 700c)

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 January 2016 - 4:04pm
Si wrote:breakwellmz wrote:This sort of thing?-

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/231277328320? ... EBIDX%3AIT

Looks interesting but looks like it's not got lower rider mounts on the fork. Not a total deal breaker but very much a preference on a tourer for me.

I agree - a lot of the time I ride with only my front panniers on (I like to be able to keep an eye on them ) and lowriders are a must. In fact that's why I replaced my standard Kaffenback fork with the CdF one.
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