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Re: London black taxi driver ‘used car as weapon to ram cycl

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 January 2016 - 9:58am
Excuse my language but FFS!

The message out there really is "It's fine to use your vehicle as a weapon because chances are you'll get let off, a slap on the wrist from a lenient judge or escape due to a technicality"

Re: Commuting lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 January 2016 - 9:58am
I recognise that situation but from the other side.
There was a time (2010?) when dynamo lights were the "in thing" in the Audax world, a fashion like cycling is having with disc brakes now. I bought my dynamohub because everybody else had one and I wanted one too.

I have had to go out on gratuitous night rides ever since to justify all the money that I spent on something which I didnt really have a need for.

Still useful for keeping your gadgets fueled while touring though.

Re: Commuting lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 January 2016 - 9:49am
I imagine Tangled Metal is in a similar situation to me, with a limited budget and unable to justify splashing out on an initially expensive lighting system that is stuck on one bike. When I have bought expensive lights I have justified the cost (to myself and my better half) by saying that I can use it on my audax bike and my tourer (which doubles as a commuter). The front wheels are not interchangeable. So battery systems have been my route, and apart from the odd dodgy rear light (mistaken visits to Halfords) I have had good reliable light combos that have kept me well lit over thousands of miles of commuting. If I were treating myself to my idea of an ultimate commuter bike it would probably have a dynamo system, but that is a luxury I have not yet found the money for.

Re: Commuting lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 January 2016 - 9:47am
I do because I live out in the wilds but I imagine that you have plenty of street lights in Nottingham.

I was caught on the moors in a sleetshower on Sunday, my left hand had gone numb with cold and I just wanted to keep cycling, I hadnt intended being out after dark anyway. I did keep thinking that a puncture would be a seriously depressing thing right then. I didnt have any back up lights because it was a day ride that I had set off on.

Another reason for being depressed was that my GPS had packed up on me, that good old trick of the batteries getting too cold to produce the electricity, I could have put the same sort of batteries in my lights!

Any bike of mine that was intended for night riding would have two lights front and rear with two different power sources. AAA blinkies front and rear are adequate for backup to a dynamo and weigh in at 60g for the pair.

Re: Cycling opportunity Keswick -Kendal

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 January 2016 - 9:35am
If the temporary road is going to be an extension of the forest track that runs through the woods to the east of the A591 I'd be happy enough taking a touring bike or MTB along it but wouldn't really want to take a normal road bike, its fairly rough.
They mean what they say about the closure - two of us were running last week and knowing the road was closed had expected to still be able to negotiate the forest track on a day of poor weather when we didn't really want to be on the high fells. Arriving at a high fence across the track we were politely but firmly refused further access. We had a sensible discussion with them - it wasn't as if we could pop back a mile or two to a car and then drive round, we had a long way to run either way and had negotiated a lot of worse ground before reaching that point but they wouldn't relent and we ended up with a much longer run than we had originally planned.

Re: Commuting lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 January 2016 - 9:30am
But what happens if you get a puncture on your Dynamo bike, in the dark, on the way home? How do you see to mend it? Oh, you need a back up battery light!

Re: Commuting lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 January 2016 - 9:20am
Dynamos are great if you only need lights on one bike, but they don't suit all circumstances.

Which sort of brings us back to the point of the original thread deviation.
The one place where dynamo lights really shine is on a dedicated all year commuter bike.
If I had such a steed, it would have dynamo lights.

Re: Coast to Coast England ... SUPPORTED..

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 January 2016 - 9:19am
A few years back I did the Way of the Roses route with my wife and kids, and it is mostly very enjoyable and scenic. If it has a flaw it is the easternmost section after the Wolds, which is easy but a bit dull. The best bits are in the Pennines. I would avoid any routes that end in built up industrial areas since they are blatantly designed to bring about regeneration to run-down areas, rather than providing the best route. I'd look to finish in somewhere like Whitby.

Re: Airnimal Joey on Trains

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 January 2016 - 9:15am
Richard Fairhurst wrote:FCC don't exist any more, of course: it's now Govia Thameslink (aka Great Northern, Thameslink and Southern).

There you go then - the perils of making commuting civil servants fold their Brommies at the barrier and carry them on their way to review your franchise renewal

Re: Commuting lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 January 2016 - 9:04am
MikeF wrote:TrevA wrote:I've been searching for the battery light Holy Grail for some time.

I started off with a B&M Ixon IQ. I bought one for my son who had a 15 mile each way country lane commute. He was well impressed with it and is still using it 6 years later. I bought one for myself, used it for about 4 years and it's now on my wife's commuting bike. I found that I could get 4-5 hours on high beam and 10 hours on low. Beam good enough to see by on a dark lane, though it doesn't turn night into day.

I replaced it with a Phillips Saferide. Probably brighter than the Ixon but i've been disappointed by the run times and it's a weight old beast and also a bit of a lump, stuck on the bars and takes up quite a bit of space. I've also lost one of the brackets in a recent house move. I only have the oversized bracket, so it can only be used on my audax bike. I mainly commute on my tourer with 26mm bars.

I bought a Cateye Volt 400 and was impressed with it. Not as bright as the Saferide but very light, small and doesn't take up much room on the bars. It's just about bright enough for dark country lane riding. I've now bought a Volt 1200 (£105 in the Evans Warehouse sale). This has all of the advantages of the 400 but it's much brighter, similar run time - in fact it lasts longer as I can run it in a lower mode, with equal brightness. I use this as my main light with the 400 as back up. I also have an extra back up of a cheap "be seen" led light from Halfords.

For rear lights, I use a Cateye Rapid 3. Bright enough, has several modes, it runs off a single AA and I find it last for about 50 hours before the battery needs changing. Back up is a Halfords cheap LED.

Brucey wrote:Tangled Metal wrote:....Were talking cost effective now....

the problems you have encountered with your battery lights are to some extent shared with most of them.

As to 'cost effective' how do you value your time and your safety?

I'd suggest that you have already spent the thick end (or more) of the price of a hub generator based system on crappy battery lights and you now propose to spend even more...? That is just throwing good money after bad IMHO.

I am pretty sure that I have spent between £500 and £1000 on battery lights over the years and nearly all of them were junk. In the meantime I've run a couple of bikes with hub generators and they have cost pennies to keep going, been far less faff and much more reliable.

I still use battery lights occasionally for some purposes on some bikes but for a 35min commute I'd choose a hub generator system every time.

cheers



I have spent just over £250 on the various lighting systems. They all still work and I can equip 4 bikes with reasonable lights with these.

I'd have to have spent at least a similar amount on dynamo systems for my touring and audax bikes, but they would not be easily transferable to either my wife's bike or my summer bike, which needs a light for spring and autumn chain gangs and riding back from early season evening TT's. The big plus of battery lights is their tranferability between bikes, which is important when you have a stable of 6 bikes.

Dynamos are great if you only need lights on one bike, but they don't suit all circumstances.

Re: Coast to Coast England ... SUPPORTED..

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 January 2016 - 8:42am
Looking on the Wayfarers web site I see they will arrange transfers.
http://wayfarershostel.com/facilities/b ... transfers/
I don't apologise for plugging this place as it really is a great stop. Where else on Tripadvisor will you find 106 out of 106 reviews as excellent?

Re: Commuting lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 January 2016 - 8:37am
pwa wrote:This has to be the best Topic Drift ever! Where will it end?
It cannot end at least until we survive an assassination attempt at Stavromula Beta.

Re: Airnimal Joey on Trains

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 January 2016 - 8:23am
FCC don't exist any more, of course: it's now Govia Thameslink (aka Great Northern, Thameslink and Southern). We live in FGW territory and have never had any problems with the Airnimal, so I suspect theory and enforcement are different.

Re: Commuting lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 January 2016 - 7:53am
This has to be the best Topic Drift ever! Where will it end?

Re: Coast to Coast England ... SUPPORTED..

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 January 2016 - 7:09am
Paulatic wrote:A bag I moved out the way one morning was so heavy I could barely lift it. There was no way a bike could carry it. Amazed what some people need for a few days away.

I did the C2C & Reivers a few years ago with the CTC. I had a small rucksac but one rider had four panniers and a rack bag. He couldn't get up the first hill so we ended up with his panniers distributed amongst the rest of us. He still struggled on the hills even then.

Re: Airnimal Joey on Trains

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 January 2016 - 6:41am
There is only a couple of operators (FCC & FGW) who have the wheel size restriction. You can find who requires what for folding bikes at http://www.atob.org.uk/bike-rail/uk-bik ... trictions/

Re: Recommend (or sell!) me a touring frame (disc 700c)

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 January 2016 - 1:19am
JaccoW wrote:How about a Specialized Awol expert frame?

Have you priced them? £700!!! Getting into custom build territory.

http://www.evanscycles.com/products/spe ... t-ec128708

Another vote for the Disc Trucker here. Cheap for a frameset. And the Truckers are great do it all bikes.

Re: Coast to Coast England ... SUPPORTED..

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 January 2016 - 11:39pm
Don't know too much about them but we are looking at these people
http://www.c2chasslefree.co.uk
They have a number of packages
We are thinking of doing it over two days

Re: Cuba: - You’ll love it or hate it

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 January 2016 - 11:15pm
Generally liked it . I went with Exodus. Food generally very bad. Given you are in the Caribbean and most of the Islands have good food , it must be a state thing. Loved the Salsa music which was generally only around the Tourist area. Disliked the Revolutionary exhibits that we seemed to have to attend occasionally . Loved the climate and empty roads and old cars and safe environment. As for the politics, they have not done so bad when you understand there big neighbour has tried to squeeze the life out of them and also compare them with lots of their near neighbours like Haiti

Re: Airnimal Joey on Trains

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 January 2016 - 10:55pm
I have a club-mate who takes Airnimals (he has two, but he doesn't take them both at once ) on our line into KX, in the rush hour. He has no problems. He only does it on days when he's planning to ride back part way or something; he has a Brompton for normal use. There again, I've seen someone with one of those larger Dahon fold-in-half MTBs with full-size wheels, and even someone who just takes the wheels off a road bike and stacks it in three pieces.

Given the number of Bromptons on our trains, you have to say that it's a good thing that not too many cyclists push the bounds of what can be considered "folding".
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