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Re: fell walking vs cycling

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 July 2014 - 7:21pm
Having spent about equal amounts of time on the two disciplines over many decades, the one generalisation I'd make is that cycling fitness usually made me fit for walking, but hillwalking fitness didn't make me fit for cycling.

Re: fell walking vs cycling

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 July 2014 - 7:20pm
jawaka wrote:.... that though although we were out for 6 hours a sandwich, energy bar and crisps seemed enough food. I'd worry on the bike if I hadn't more than that in six hours.That's you, not me.
I can go out for 6hrs and not eat a thing, and only perhaps drink a bottle of water.

Eat enough before you go, make sue you are well hydrated before and perhaps during, and get home nice and hungry.
It's only six hours.

Re: One night in the Welsh Hills

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 July 2014 - 7:13pm
I enjoyed reading that particularly as I have ridden around the Llanreader y Mochrant area &stayed in the village a few times in the past
Thanks for posting

Re: fell walking vs cycling

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 July 2014 - 6:45pm
You use different muscles, to some extent, going up steeper hills like the ones you were on, even than when cycling. The only thing that really gets you fit for walking up really steep gradients is walking up steep gradients, believe me. (I spent the earlier part of this year getting fir for a trip to the hills on Skye). Cycling helps with some muscles, even helps more than walking only on the flat, and of course is good for general fitness, but the steeper hills can easily find muscles I don't use for anything else.

Bannerdale crags is a lovely route up Blencathra- though I go on to the summit from there avoiding Sharp Edge myself, as I have no head for ridges. You can do a nice loop back over Bowscale Fell and Bowscale Tarn.

helping team leader in the mountains

CTC Forum - Racing - 3 July 2014 - 6:24pm
I haven't found an answer to this by searching, but I understand slipstreaming and can see what an effect it has at speed, but I can't see that it can be effective at mountain climbing speeds. So is there an effect or do teams try not to leave the team leader isolated for psychological reasons or just for pacing and encouragement?

Re: Tesco delivery van driver

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 July 2014 - 6:21pm
Great thread. Yup, we should definitely keep this! Had a couple of 'interactions' with local lorries recently. Emailed one firms head office, full of praise, and added 'bet you don't get many of these!' Reply said I was the first, very pleased and would pass on comments to driver. Other one, called into local office, and they were stunned that I had bothered, and called driver in who was chuffed, turned out he cycled to work! Not such a bad world after all!!

Re: Stir in soups

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 July 2014 - 6:19pm
If I'm touring on my bike I want all the calories I can get!

fell walking vs cycling

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 July 2014 - 6:17pm
I did the Tourmalet 3 weeks ago, and last week went fell walking up Blencathra via Bannerdale crags and Sharp Edge in the Lakes, about 8.5 miles and a lot of ascending.
I noticed that I seemed to be breathing a lot harder when walking uphill than on the bike, but also that moving the legs didn't seem an effort, whereas on the Tourmalet I was aware of making effort on pedal strokes. Walking uphill felt less challenging and being able to see the summit a long way off wasn't disheartening. I also noticed that though although we were out for 6 hours a sandwich, energy bar and crisps seemed enough food. I'd worry on the bike if I hadn't more than that in six hours.
I was a bit surprised to find that I had some aching at just the top of my thighs at the end of the walk, but the big difference was how unrecovered I felt the next day after the walk, I really wouldn't have wanted to do another. I think that is probably due to biking being low impact whereas walking puts more stress on your body and shakes up your internal organs. Unless "For Goodness Shakes" which I used after biking is a miracle recovery drink.

Re: Stir in soups

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 July 2014 - 5:49pm
I like Ainsleys packet soups, some excellent flavours and all less than 100 calories

Al

Re: Stir in soups

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 July 2014 - 5:26pm
Might have to find an old cigar tube to put them in . Guess I'm a little paranoid after the squeezy carnation incident after it escaped its shackles. A small box (ideally locking ) for the squashables isn't too much to carry I suppose. Good to know they will withstand some shaking about.

Could always bungee it to the outside of the mudguard along with the bananas

I tend to eat out late lunch and Breakfast number 2 and are happy to keep it simple in the evenings and breakfast 1. I like the sound of the gooey bit in the bottom. Concentrated treat to finish.

Re: France: La Manche to Le Med -advice?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 July 2014 - 5:10pm
I did Caen to Montpelier a few years back. I had difficulties finding a suitable route between Nevers and Lyon, so took the train. I recommend that you take in Sancerre - the view of the town in the distance as you approach it from the west is a thing of beauty. I thoroughly enjoyed the stop over in La Charite sur Loire. I slogged down the A7 through Valence, Montelimar & Orange. I don't recommend this, as it's a busy route, but it seemed like a good idea at the time; you could probably plot a route that weaves around the main drag. Avignon to Montpelier is a very pleasant ride. I approached Montpelier from the south, passing through Aigues Morte and Pavalas - not a route I would necessarily recommend, but I was staying on the south side. PM me if you want more details.

Re: Tesco delivery van driver

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 July 2014 - 4:51pm
Nice to see a 'good driver' thread – perhaps this can be a regular cheering up feature .
There's a long downhill stretch on a busy B road in a 20mph zone which I always dread – I usually get numerous close overtakes as drivers break the speed limit to beat me to each traffic island. Coming home last night, a kind person hung back all the way and refrained from tailgating when I slowed to turn off – thank you .

Re: Stir in soups

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 July 2014 - 3:24pm
if you are thorough with the stirring they are great - better than cup a soup although less choice of flavours.

I put them inside my kettle for transport along with the stove - no issues with damage or mess.

Re: Tesco delivery van driver

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 July 2014 - 3:05pm
Psamathe wrote:A few weeks ago I was given really good clearance (unexpected) by a CTS Buildbase lorry. And I then needed to order loads of sand, ballast and cement (7 big square bags and a palette of cement) so I used that builders merchant and told them about the good driving their delivery driver had (incl. the vehicle) and hence my selection of supplier. And word got around the company and when delivered the driver knew I had praised his driving (same driver delivered my stuff).

I always try to give both good and bad feedback - as I believe the good feedback can be as effective (or more effective) than complaints.

Ian

Well said.

Re: Stir in soups

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 July 2014 - 2:53pm
These have been around for two or three years now. They are ok but don't disolve particularly well and you usually get left with sludge at the bottom of the cup.
I would think they would survive in a pannier reasonably well, maybe double wrap them in a ziplock bag to be sure.
Personally I would stick with Cup-a-soup, although the genuine Heinz Tomato flavour of these tubes is good.

26" folder

CTC Forum - MTB - 3 July 2014 - 2:33pm
Time to rationalise the bikes. I'm mostly on road but use the mountain bike occassionally on rough tracks and expect to use it on moorland tracks now that my son lives in north yorks. I don't drive after health issues so use the rain from time to time, but more likely is for my wife to drive us, but she won't drive with the bike rack on the car. I think a folder will be practical for my uses. It won't be wild downhill stuff. I'll use it in winter too as I've got 26" winter stud tyres for commuting I know Dahon did one but the only 26" I can find is the Espresso which seems more of an urban bike than off- roader. Montague seem to get good reviews, but seem a bit pricey for the amount of use I'll get Are there others worth considering?

Re: Cycle Touring in the Outer Hebrides - Questions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 July 2014 - 2:24pm
Thanks for all your informative and enthusiastic responses - really can't wait to get up there now. I have booked the train to Glasgow on the 22nd and will return from the same on the 29th. This should give me just about enough time to do the route suggested. I will post up pictures on my return!!!

Fingers crossed on weather

Re: Spain North to South

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 July 2014 - 2:15pm
Horses for courses I guess, but my personal preference is a trail/track to any road, any day !

- no cars/fumes/dangers
- close to country side
- many tracks/trail are old routes... churches, vialles, etc, etc.

Stir in soups

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 July 2014 - 1:25pm
I see Heinz are now doing a stir in soup that seems to be in ultralight packaging: http://www.heinz.co.uk/en/Products/Soup ... -of-Tomato.

Anyone tried them in a pannier yet? I can gamble on the price to taste one, it's more the robustness of the packaging when on the bike I'm interested in.

Re: France: La Manche to Le Med -advice?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 July 2014 - 12:23pm
Central france can be hilly as well as hot. Which means allowing more time, water and suncreme. Start as early as possible and make sure your properly hydrated before a climb. Alcohol isn't really your friend. Standard stuff.
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