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Re: A sunday in hell

CTC Forum - Racing - 14 July 2014 - 12:15am
a classic, some great documentary filmmaking from the 1970s with a little whiff of the Nouvelle Vague. Some of the off-race scenes are great too, like the punters in the Valenciennes bar and those showers in the Roubaix velodrome, which look like a concentration camp. pretty weird.

Re: progressing through a group of cyclists

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 July 2014 - 11:37pm
There's no protocol for this, because one rider isn't supposed to be able to overtake 20 in normal circumstances. The only known method is to slip up the side to a few riders back from the front, then launch a devastating attack and keep it going for the next 100 miles with Phil Liggett describing your every move.

Re: On the road one year.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 July 2014 - 11:27pm
I sometimes question my mental capacity. It's not the long days in the saddle but the absence of home comforts that might do it for me. I guess you can only test yourself and see how it goes but like many cycle tourers I have had my fair share of days where I find myself muttering "this is supposed to be fun"!). I notice that whilst I really enjoy travelling by myself and really like camping too much of both of these together can be a bad combination for me.
Thanks for your kind words. I agree that too much of a good thing can be bad. We have found ourselves going through some beautiful areas and not really enjoying things because we have been trying to do too much. You can't see everything on your way through a country and if conditions are bad we try and take a break.
We have learned to take things at face value as well, you hear negative things about some countries which are mostly unfounded. One of the beauties of cycling is that you are never seen as a threat, we have found people to be very open and kind to us. Particularly in central Asia where conditions are generally harsher it is the friendliness of the local people that can keep you going. So start planning that long trip.

Re: progressing through a group of cyclists

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 July 2014 - 11:04pm
And if being polite doesn't work, AirZound

Re: Watching TdF and ... open mouths ... bugs!

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 July 2014 - 10:33pm
How can you tell a happy cyclist?







By the bugs in his teeth.

Re: progressing through a group of cyclists

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 July 2014 - 10:28pm
Excuse me please, I'd like to come past.
May I overtake?
Sorry, in a hurry, can I just...?

Re: progressing through a group of cyclists

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 July 2014 - 10:22pm
Hi,
I treat them like peds on a shared path.........just keep dinging away.......I have had to ding bikes too on cycle and shared paths.........

progressing through a group of cyclists

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 July 2014 - 10:14pm
Hi all,

On my way home after an on-call shift the other morning, I came up behind and caught a group of around 20-30 cyclists. this was along a narrow country lane, and they were riding two abreast, which I have no problem with. Now I would have quite liked to make progress through this group but could not quite see how, as I could not see far enough ahead to over take the entire group and there were no gaps.
What is the etiquette here? I decided that after overtaking the back markers, I would just sit and wait. (I did have two full paniers on my old steel bike, and I had already said good morning, loudly, which had elicited no response)
Of interest to myself, this was the first time I had experienced the effects of riding at the back of a large group of cyclists, I was amazed at how much easier it was to cycle.


Many thanks
Martin

Re: A sunday in hell

CTC Forum - Racing - 13 July 2014 - 10:01pm
I really enjoyed it; seeing those guys (who were my cycle racing heroes when I was a nipper) riding Paris Roubaix was fantastic. Mercx's saddle tweaking obsession laid bare too!

Call me an old fuddy-duddy if you like, but to my eyes the bikes those guys rode were rather wonderful; I dreamed of having a bike with a Nuovo Record gruppo on it and when I finally got one, years later, I hardly wanted to ride it in case (God forbid) I spoiled its perfect beauty.

Of course modern bikes are lighter, faster etc but I do not think that cycle racing (as a sport) is in any way improved by this. I found it interesting that a field as large as the TdeF needed only fifteen team cars in support and most of them had only two bikes on board. Despite numerous incidents, (and in contrast to several of the pile-ups in this year's TdeF where riders have seen their rear dropouts come free in a prang) I didn't see anyone need a bike change, only wheel changes.

cheers

Re: On the road one year.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 July 2014 - 9:26pm
I've been really enjoying your posts and catching up on some of your blog/journal. It is SO impressive. I think I would like to cycle a fair chunk of the world one day but the Central Asia thing doesn't really appeal ( although Georgia and the other European bits I'm totally sold on as they play to my preference for beauty plus a bit more ease of travelling.)

My personal retirement plan has always been to cycle Alaska to terra del fuego. I have no idea how doable it it but it really appeals. Before then I have plenty of plans with the Baltic cycle route always in the back of my mind for a long summer break from work (if I get made redundant ever please let it be in April!) and kids and stuff. Plus New Zealand, and many of the other popular destinations. For some reason in my imagination I'm often cycling in India but I don't know why as it isn't at the top of my destination list at all!

I do have a question for myself though ( and this is the question you have already tested yourselves on so bravo). I know that I am physically capable of cycling long distances. I sometimes question my mental capacity. It's not the long days in the saddle but the absence of home comforts that might do it for me. I guess you can only test yourself and see how it goes but like many cycle tourers I have had my fair share of days where I find myself muttering "this is supposed to be fun"!). I notice that whilst I really enjoy travelling by myself and really like camping too much of both of these together can be a bad combination for me. The reason I think it is just a case of management rather than a huge deal is because My husband wants to sail the world and I suspect that I would really crack on a transatlantic crossing, in a totally different way compared to the odd lack of enthusiasm when cycling, due to the constraints of living on a small boat. At least with my bike I have the freedom to go anywhere and I find that fabulous.

On the road one year.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 July 2014 - 8:43pm
Last month we celebrated one year on the road in Tashkent Uzbekistan. We have travelled through 19 countries clocking up 11,000km, we weren't sure what it would be like being tour for so long but it is GREAT! Anyone else out there planning to sell everything and go touring? www.cycling-nomads.com

Re: Help with choosing bike type and/or commute through Lond

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 July 2014 - 8:43pm
my 2d worth.....agree most bikes should be ok; from what people say, you might be better using the roads-while you say you've sussed out the tow path, have you done so during your actual travel hours (apols if this is insulting!)..and getting hold of a copy of city cycling by Richard Balantine might be useful-plenty of good advice in there as well.

Go for it and enjoy!

Dave

Re: Watching TdF and ... open mouths ... bugs!

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 July 2014 - 8:24pm
There aren't many vegetarians on Le Tour

Re: BT Openreach cyclists stay back

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 July 2014 - 8:01pm
ArMoRothair wrote:BeeKeeper wrote:So I need a sign which says "Unlike you I don't have X-Ray vision, so stay back"

Reversing cameras are dirt cheap these days and would probably be a whole lot more useful to you for both its normal purpose and seeing cyclists/walkers/dogs in these particular circumstances.

At least a couple of hundred pounds to get something fitted to my van. You can get cheaper wireless ones but reports suggest these can suffer from interference. I may still get one for reversing in narrow streets etc. But my point was I get cyclists following up my chuff and I can't see them. Perhaps they assume I have a reversing camera?

Re: Cycling to Nordkapp: searching for suggestions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 July 2014 - 7:55pm
serbring wrote:pal wrote:which electricity plugin is there in norway?

It's the same as the rest of continental Europe (two pin sockets).

This one?

http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_e ... roplug.png

thanks
yes

Re: Cycling to Nordkapp: searching for suggestions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 July 2014 - 7:49pm
pal wrote:which electricity plugin is there in norway?

It's the same as the rest of continental Europe (two pin sockets).

This one?

http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_e ... roplug.png

thanks

Re: BT Openreach cyclists stay back

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 July 2014 - 7:47pm
still want vehicles to get a second set of indicators - maybe in green - which show where the satnav is telling them to go

Re: Cycle touring coincidences

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 July 2014 - 6:57pm
When I lived in Japan my sister decided to visit from Seattle. The day after she arrived we were leaving our apartment when we bumped into our next door neighbour who had her brother visiting from New York. My sister and her brother instantly recognised each other. They had sat next to each other on the flight which had gone from New York via Seattle to Tokyo.

Re: Cycle touring coincidences

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 July 2014 - 6:16pm
Not a cycling one but a few years ago I was on Holiday in Grindelwald, Switzerland and bumped into my Nephew and family who had decided to go camping there. At the same time my cousins who live at the other end of England to me were holidaying in Wengen just the other side of the hill.

Cycling in Ireland?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 July 2014 - 6:12pm
I haven't been there for several years, usually took the families bikes in the minibus and cycled locally.
I would, personally, avoid the tourist routes, most notably, the 'Ring of Kerry', but even then there are some nice rides there, like Killorglin to Waterville up the centreline of the peninsula, then around Bolus Head and Valencia, etc..
My favourite is Dingle, west beyond Dingle and also over the Chonair Pass to Brandon. There is also a lovely little pass over the hills to the west of the waterfall on the Chonair Pass to the South west of Brandon (Saints way?) that is slate and mountain bike territory, but OK for half an hours pushing uphill on a tourer over the top part. You won't see another soul between the road on the west side of Ballysiteragh (that the pass is just north of) and Cloghane.

I always found food expensive, especially in restaurants and 'gastro pubs'. Only disappointment was the average small pub to whom a cheese sandwich was a precut slice of cheddar from a pack on white sliced bread (the 'doorstep' with thick cut cheese seemed unheard of). Ham was usually the processed micron thick variety. Take plenty of money....

I have a friend who regularly cycled around west Ireland after season in September (I always went in school hols), his experience was mainly dry. It seems that July and August you take chances with weather.
The people are very friendly and usually say hello as you cycle past.
The terrain is quite hilly for the most part, but with that comes the views.
Enjoy it, you will probably want to go back too.

Andy Short.
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