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Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 11:30am

I know.
I was just being obtuse a bit.

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 10:40am
Mistik-ka wrote:[XAP]Bob wrote:You can't rely on getting off cycle paths, particularly in a new area. Therefore you can't use them...
Quite so. (Thanks, Bob, reohn2, and others; this topic has obviously struck a nerve with a number of people )

Trying to make the best of a bad situation, are there any on-line mapping sites which indicate the presence — if not the nature — of barriers on cycle paths? At the moment I'm reduced to using the street views in the Journey Planner on Cyclestreets.net to check for tandem traps where cycle paths intersect with google-mapped roads … a laborious process and not always satisfactory. (Should I post this as a separate thread? It is about using cycle paths, but is perhaps it's a bit of a diversion on an already-existing diversion … about diversions. )
You should probably post a new threads.

Cycle Streets and Sustrans are probably the best sources of information. They do mark barriers on some paths. However, not all barriers are indicated on thir maps. CycleStreets depends upon people reporting them to either CycleStreets or the open mapping that it is based upon. Sustrans has some, but not all barriers marked on their maps. If it's an NCN, the best thing to do is check the sustrans map(s), and contact the Ranger for the area(s), and ask if there are barriers that aren't marked on the maps. Otherwise, cycle paths are best avoided, as there is no guarantee that they will be useable with a touring tandem.

p.s. I like the term 'tandem traps'; it is very descriptive. I just wish we didn't need a term to describe them!

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 10:37am
Mick F wrote:There are no hills. Cycling on the flat is boring.

To post that is to miss the point by a mile!

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 10:34am
snibgo wrote:
I think UK society is dysfunctional. We have become addicted to cars, and have adapted our society to the needs of cars, to the detriment of humans. This has been gradual but persistent over many decades.

Can we kick the addiction? Not easily, and not willingly. Without a massive incentive, we will become more dysfunctional.

My conclusion: we will grow more obese, more unfit, and die early through pollution and lack of exercise.

Exactly!

And unless we change it'll cost us dearly as a nation and individually,in health and wealth.
Of course,some will prosper as a result.............

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 10:31am
PH wrote:The radical question is not how to change some peoples mode of transport, but why are we travelling so much anyway?
The UK follows the longest working day in Europe with he longest commute. Not that Europe is a shining example, but it would at least be a start. Despite a generation of amazing technological advance, I'm still expected to work the same hours as my father, why? Why are people travelling so far to work? Why do people need to consume so much? If we're not producing great wealth why are we putting so much effort in? If we are, where is it going
Don't get me wrong, getting more people to cycle rather than drive would be a good thing, but it's not nearly enough to stop us running into that wall.

Quite!

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 10:29am
andrewk wrote:This is beyond ludditeism!

Much as I am pro cycling I firmly oppose the anti car brigade, as does the majority of the population.
To successfully promote cycling one has to win over the public, NOT antagonise them....a left wing bearded weirdos' vision of a cycling nirvana predicated on banning or severely restricting car use is sure to garner almost universal opposition and thus backfire.
You quote me completely out of context,nor do I have a beard,don't regard myself as weird and do own a car .
I'm in no way wanting to ban the car but to make the alternatives more convenient and the bike isn't, and never will be the answer to the greater part,but public transport could be if done right.

Get real! Cycling has to grow and prosper alongside private motor transport, the two aren't mutually exclusive.
I'm being very 'real',nor did I say the two are mutually exclusive.
The provision for cycling in the UK is abysmal for the most part,the attitude to cycling is the one you're levelling at me as "left wing bearded weirdos'" though despite that cycling is growing,so there must be a lot of "left wing bearded weirdos'" about
Think what could happen if cycling were given priority instead of government platitudes and being stamped on as the sickly minister's attitude I linked to above.

Given the general belief that costly infrastructure is required for cycling to grow and prosper the importance of carrying public opinion and thus politicians with one is paramount.
And many,many times more costly infrastructure for ever more car use,so that in an ever shorter time scale,we'll need even more more roads as we overgrow the ones's we are now building,is that a satisfactory answer?
What is public opinion anyway,do you know?
The public has been left with no choice but to use the car as a means of transport with many people commuting 20miles each way or more a day,without any real alternative and once it's on the drive it's even more convenient,as everything is geared up for it's use as we slowly choke on it's fumes in the endless lines of waiting traffic.
The truth is society has been geared up for the car and was led along that path,for profit and a dream that's slowly becoming a nightmare.
Do you really think public transport was deregulated for the good of the people?

Edited for typo's

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 9:35am
Mistik-ka wrote:Mark1978 wrote:The 'road' below is about as wide as a single track road but is easily wide enough for two way cycling with room to spare.
Blimey, that looks like heaven! No it doesn't.
There are no hills. Cycling on the flat is boring.

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 9:16am
Go back, read PH's last post, and then look at the subsequent posts that ignore his and rant about the need for cars.

PH has hit one important nail firmly on the head. We go on about a need for cars, but why do we? They have become the norm. Because they are so cheap and convenient we have organised our lives around the use of them. We accept their use as a pre-requisite and base our living plans on them- we take our homes on the assumption that we can, and will drive to work, or shopping, or the kids to school, or just to drive. I admit to living like this (Mme drives to work, and I am dreaming of a change of job that would require this at least temporarily), but can see the fallacy of such a culture.

Yes, I am bearded and rather left oriented (if you hadn't guessed... ).

Re: Wet weather gear

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 8:43am
Similar questions and problems on a couple of so called 'pleasure/leisure' rides ( Big respect to commuters).
Here's my take on alleged waterproof clothing http://wp.me/p3yZa1-1eA

It seems the only waterproof item seems to be our skin.

Re: Tanker lorry, spot on driving

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 7:33am
Milk tankers round here from Muller are very good, I find. And bin lorries going to the local site also, which is on a narrowish road; they never try to overtake, drive too close, or hassle. On the bike, I always pull over to let them past as soon as I can find a safe place to. Same with our local heavy haulage firm.

However, as a driver, on motorways and dual carriageways I'm increasingly finding that the overall standard of HGV driving is plummeting to dangerous levels. Drivers wanting to overtake other lorries just pile out in front of me, often only signalling after they have started to drift over the line, leaving me only a few yards at most in front of me. Even if they signal before, it's on the 'coming ready or not' principle.
Now I would always allow an HGV to pull out in front of me if it signalled its request, but I need enough warning to slow down and give sufficient space for it to pull in safely, as the space I leave in front of me is, in heavy traffic, about 2s between me and the vehicle in front, it isn't usually going to be big enough for a lorry and its stopping distance as well.
On occasion, when I have not been in a position to move out and there simply hasn't been space, as I've been already alongside the lorry before it started to signal, it has pulled out right in front of the vehicle behind me, and flashed, and then driven so close I couldn't see its number, which is very frightening.
This didn't used to happen. And it needs to stop.

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 4:40am
andrewk wrote:reohn2 wrote:The key to this is curbing motor traffic speed and parking(for all but the infirm)

This is beyond ludditeism!


Sadly, I agree with both of you.

I think UK society is dysfunctional. We have become addicted to cars, and have adapted our society to the needs of cars, to the detriment of humans. This has been gradual but persistent over many decades.

Can we kick the addiction? Not easily, and not willingly. Without a massive incentive, we will become more dysfunctional.

My conclusion: we will grow more obese, more unfit, and die early through pollution and lack of exercise.

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 3:38am
[quote="reohn2"]
The key to this is curbing motor traffic speed and parking(for all but the infirm)
[quote]

This is beyond ludditeism!

Much as I am pro cycling I firmly oppose the anti car brigade, as does the majority of the population.
To successfully promote cycling one has to win over the public, NOT antagonise them....a left wing bearded weirdos' vision of a cycling nirvana predicated on banning or severely restricting car use is sure to garner almost universal opposition and thus backfire.
Get real! Cycling has to grow and prosper alongside private motor transport, the two aren't mutually exclusive. Given the general belief that costly infrastructure is required for cycling to grow and prosper the importance of carrying public opinion and thus politicians with one is paramount.

Re: Tanker lorry, spot on driving

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 1:58am
I'm out in the country, not far from Letchworth.

The last few years, I've had very few bad encounters with HGVs. Hardly any, and the worst is when they are too impatient to overtake and sit on my wheel. Perhaps catching my slipstream, ha! This is self-defeating, as it makes it difficult for me to pull in to the next farm entrance, to let him past.

Ten to 20 years ago, they used to be far worse, squeezing past me at high speed and far to close, sucking me into their slipstream.

Perhaps being a fair distance from a town, hence possible drop-off/pick-up points, is in my favour. An HGV driver is less likely to be running up against a deadline. Perhaps improvements over the last decade reflects better diver training. I don't know.

HGVs are involved in a disproportionate number of cyclist collisions in London. Perhaps this is deadline pressure, or the general pressure of driving big vehicles in cramped London streets. Touch wood, they seem to be saints around here.

Re: Wet weather gear

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 November 2014 - 11:56pm
For commuting, I just use softshells (Gore Windstopper) jackets. They're waterproof enough that even in the worst conditions they keep me drier than my waterproofs, and the breath well. They're also good as it's easy to regulate temperature as they rely on being windproof rather than having insulation so unzipping a bit provides plenty of cooling.

If it looks like it might rain and it's no longer summer, I'll wear a softshell instead of a jersey. It saves spending the entire commute wondering if the rain will last long enough to be worthwhile stopping to put a jacket on.

Besides that taking it a bit easier will reduce the amount you heat up.

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 November 2014 - 11:46pm
Cars are not the problem. They are a necessary part of modern life. I live in a small town in a largely rural area of the country with very poor public transport. I can and do commute by bike the 10 miles to my place of work in a neighbouring town as often as I can, but I am a hardy rider who quite enjoys riding in the dark and the foul weather that we have most of the winter and some of the summer. However, my work colleagues think I am insane. They may treat me as an equal on the road, but they will never see cycling as a 'normal' mode of transport if by that we mean a substitute for a car and I am not sure that I would want them to either. To be quite honest it is rather nice to be thought of as a bit of a head case.

Re: Wet weather gear

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 November 2014 - 10:27pm
Paulatic wrote:Buffalo
October to April I've no decisions on what to wear I just put on my Buffalo whatever the weather. Below 5C I usually wear a base layer under it. Dries in no time at all.


+1. Shelled (micro) pile is a great way to feel dry in most conditions. Buffalo, Marmot Driclime, RAB Vapour rise are all variations on the theme. I've got a couple Karrimor Kalahari pile and pertex jackets from the 90's which are excellent in the wet/cold weather.

Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 26 November 2014 - 9:56pm
Radomir wrote:"So unless you do get hit by a SW gale and/or do want to go over Bealach na Ba then that may be a better option". Sorry for my English but could you please explain the above more clear (more easy)?
The route from Stornoway to Lochmaddy heads SW across wide open ground with no shelter from the wind at all, and the Western Isles are notorious for being windy. Therefore if there is a gale from the southwest, it will be hard work and you will be better off taking a mainland route, as you will be if the Bealach na Ba is somewhere you want to go.

On the whole I'd rather take the mainland route anyway, though which is best will depend on the weather (it's fairly common for the Isles to have good weather when the mainland is poor, and the other way round).
Between Kylesku and Ullapool, the coast road through Lochinver/Inverpolly/Loch Lurgainn is a lot more scenic than the fairly uninteresting inland main road, though it will add 36 km & 700m climbing.

If you look at routes on http://cycle.travel/map, as well as click for start, click for end, an look at the route, you can also click and drag the route to go somewhere else, and click on the route and "Find photos". This is very useful if the route goes along a track, and you want to know if it is rideable or not. There's a map further down the photo page to show exactly where the photo is taken.

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 November 2014 - 9:28pm
The radical question is not how to change some peoples mode of transport, but why are we travelling so much anyway?
The UK follows the longest working day in Europe with he longest commute. Not that Europe is a shining example, but it would at least be a start. Despite a generation of amazing technological advance, I'm still expected to work the same hours as my father, why? Why are people travelling so far to work? Why do people need to consume so much? If we're not producing great wealth why are we putting so much effort in? If we are, where is it going
Don't get me wrong, getting more people to cycle rather than drive would be a good thing, but it's not nearly enough to stop us running into that wall.

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 November 2014 - 9:12pm
http://road.cc/content/news/136838-if-t ... ore-people

These are the people in charge,who wring their hands saying how CO2 levels must come down,yet increase road building and prioritise car use

Re: Tanker lorry, spot on driving

CTC Forum - On the road - 26 November 2014 - 8:42pm
FWIW I'm acutely aware of the damage HGV's are capable of,as I suppose most cyclists and indeed most road users are,I also try to help other quicker road users as much as I can in the same way you indicate.

My encounters/interactions with HGV drivers is overwhelmingly positive,if I do have bad encounters with drivers of bigger vehicles it's usually,in ascending order of bad driving either stupidly or deliberately are cars,vans in various <35cwt,4x4's,7.5tonners,buses,HGV's.Which could be in proportion,excepting 4x4's,numbers on the road.
That's my experience which I can only relate.
That said,Monday before last I had what I can honestly say was a rare encounter with a HGV,a 10ton(?)box van,which on a clear wide empty road,came out of a side road opposite on my right,an entrance of an industrial estate with wide radii good site lines,there was no way he didn't see me as I made eye contact.
It didn't stop him almost taking me out with his nearside front corner,I was close evough to bang on his nearside door.I then accelerated and sat in front of him in primary for around 500m,by which time the TL up the road had changed and there was a stream of traffic coming the opposite way preventing his o/take.
I'd decided he'd have to drive over me to get past,I think the term is 'I was steaming' .
On seeing the oncoming traffic clearing I moved over and let him go.He gave me plenty of room on the o/take and the TL changed to green so I didn't get chance to ''have a word''.
I'm convinced it was a deliberate 'get out of my way,I'm bigger than you,you mean nothing to me' attitude.
That sort of encounter with HGV's is extremely rare IME,I'm more likely to experience the kind of encounter you mention in your OP.
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