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Re: Is insurance for a tour in Europe a worthwhile purchase?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2015 - 11:17pm
Finally took out a policy, there are so many cycle insurers that go on about covering the bike itself but are deliberately vague about repatriation and cover for accidents outside the UK.

£26 single trip policy tailored for cycle touring in Europe which covers repatriation, reasonalbe medical costs and some tp liability too.

Re: Is insurance for a tour in Europe a worthwhile purchase?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2015 - 10:18pm
Travel insurance for health: Yes, definitely. For the one reason already mentioned: repatriation

Travel insurance for your belongings/bike/kit: IMO not worth it. There are plenty of exclusion which don't fit with bike touring. Often your belongings are not insured if stored in a tent or bag in a hotel room. And your bike's often not insured unless secured to specific objects with specific locks in specific places. Read the small print and see what you are getting. You may find you're not covered even if you think you are.

Mountain Rescue England and Wales launch new video

CTC Forum - On the road - 2 April 2015 - 10:16pm
Watch. Enjoy. Donate. Job done.

Make a text donation by texting RESQ41, followed by the donation amount to 70070.

Alternatively, use the justgiving page at: https://www.justgiving.com/mountainrescue/

Many thanks, Simon

cycling/camping tour of France

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2015 - 10:11pm
Hi, I'm spending the second and third weeks of June cycling from Tours to Agen via the Atlantic coast and Bordeaux.
Some company along the way would be good.
I'm planning on doing some sightseeing, food tasting and camping.
Around 40 to 50 miles per day with plenty of patisserie stops ...

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2015 - 9:43pm
All seems a bit technical to me. I've just been through all this - I had a frame custom built to account for me long legs realative to height. This was brilliant - until it was nicked a few weeks ago. On a short tour of Angelsey (aagh spelling?) I was back on Bob Jackson 55cm or so and it felt way too small. I've now bought a Condor Heritage, which has a slightly sloping top tube, but in a 58cm size with a longer steerer. On first tries, this feels much closer to my custom frame - it's like coming home. Not finished the build yet so can't be sure. It seems so much is personal - I ride well forward over the pedals because my knees prefer it, so keep a longer (120mm) stem. Shallow drops suit me fine. It's counter intuitive that a sloping top tube would be better for me, but it actually means I can raise the bar height to what feels good. There are so many variables in body shape and riding style (not to mention and I don't age and fitness) that I don't believe in any numbers system. Trouble is, trial and error can be so costly...

Re: Is insurance for a tour in Europe a worthwhile purchase?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2015 - 9:37pm
pstallwood wrote:In my case we had 4 seats on Easyjet. 3 for me so I could raise my leg and one for my wife. We had a private ambulance home from Gatwick.

Same for us on BA when my partner did her medial ligament skiing. Except she had a seat next to me for her and two seats in the back of the plane for her leg. Took quite some doing on a full plane to get the seats back together. And that was after a trip by French ambulance to the airport the crew of which had spent all morning in the bar at the resort before picking us up.

Re: London to Paris

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2015 - 8:33pm
For the crossing there are only 2 Eurotunnel trains that you are allowed on. 9am and 3pm. They need to be pre-booked and the system is that you are given details of a hotel to meet at and a mini bus with a trailer turns up. You go through on that. I did it once and found it OK but why put yourself through the hassle of pre-booking and the stress of not making the hotel because of a visit from the puncture fairy....or something else.

The other option if the ferry. Turn up at ANY time, go on ANY ferry, ANY route and I think it's just £20. There are quite a few companies and crossings so you will never wait long. Pay on the gate. When you get to the ferry terminal at Dover, go into the ticket office, pay and then follow the red line through the port. Dead easy. I've done this loads of times and NEVER had a problem.

Re: Roads Are Not For Racing On

CTC Forum - On the road - 2 April 2015 - 7:18pm
Vantage
I feel your pain

Re: London to Paris

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2015 - 6:46pm
Why start in London, unless that’s where you happen to be? Cycling in London is pretty challenging if you’re not familiar with it. If it seems like wimping out to get a train to, say, Gatwick – it’s a nice ride from there to Newhaven – they could start somewhere further north (Nottingham?), and skirt round to the west of London. Nicer cycling, easier navigation, cheaper accommodation.

Re: Combined Tool/Repair Kit & First Aid Kit

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2015 - 6:37pm
nmnm wrote:I'd leave the leatherman and adjustable wrench too, can't see many uses for them (my pedals come off w an allen key).
My 6" adjustable wrench is worth its weight in gold. I've even opened gates bolted shut by grumpy neighbours who are trying to stop people cycling past their land legally. It'll take a bolted wheel off and put it on again, after a fashion or sort out pedals or help adjust some types of bottom bracket.
Was there a multitool in there? That's heavier than three or 4 allen keys and a chain tool, normally.
What norm's that then? The CPR-9 is lighter than three or 4 allen keys, but check it reaches everything on the bike and take individual keys if not.

Re: Combined Tool/Repair Kit & First Aid Kit

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2015 - 6:03pm
Thanks for going to the bother of weighing that for me. Appreciated!

Re: Is insurance for a tour in Europe a worthwhile purchase?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2015 - 5:53pm
In my case we had 4 seats on Easyjet. 3 for me so I could raise my leg and one for my wife. We had a private ambulance home from Gatwick. The help we got at Copenhagen and Gatwick airports was brilliant.

Fortunately I was relatively mobile and Easyjet was fine but many other injuries/illnesses might not have been too easy to deal with. We could have made the arrangements ourselves but would have found it difficult to deal with away from home but the insurance company did it all for us and took all the stress away from my wife. I don't know what the cost of everything was but the driver who repatriated our van said that he had spent about £700 by the time he had got the van from near Copenhagen back to us. He then had a night's stay in London and a train journey to Manchester to pay for - probably not much change out of £1000 altogether by the time he got home.

Re: Combined Tool/Repair Kit & First Aid Kit

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2015 - 5:36pm
Samuel D wrote:Interesting thread. I hope no-one minds if I revive it.

IanW wrote:+1 for the Victorinox bit wrench, but I personally would not swap it for the more convenient, but more fangled Ratchet Rocket.
The latter is a great while-at-home workshop tool, but for emergency road-side use I prefer something without the complexity of a ratchet mechanism.
Is there much difference in weight between the Victorinox Bitwrench and the Topeak Ratchet Rocket? For that matter, do you know how much the Bitwrench weighs, preferably the wrench on its own, the wrench with empty bit-holder, and the whole caboodle? I was unable to find weights on the Victorinox website or elsewhere.

Normally I don’t care about a few grams here and there, but that thinking has given me a basic toolkit that weighs nearly 1.5 kg, mostly because they’re the same tools I use at home. I’m trying to get this down a bit (hence my interest in this thread).

DSCF1322.JPG
Bitwrench + (empty) bit holder = 47gm

Bitwrench + holder + Hex 2mm, 2.5mm, 3mm, 4mm, 5mm, 6mm, 8mm, PZ1, T20 and T25 bits = 98gm

DSCF1325.JPG
This (minimal) toolkit goes on every bike journey but is not left on/with the unattended bike.
It includes a pair of "Terry" steel tyre levers an 8mm x 10mm open-ended spanner and a 14mm x 15mm oe spanner.
This allows me to tackle many (but not) all routine problems on my bike in particular and on quite a few other people's bikes.

But I also carry a spare inner-tube, pump, tube patch kit and another pair of plastic tyre levers on the bike that is left on/with the bike.

Then there is the "monster" expedition toolkit that does indeed weigh in at more than 1.5KG

Re: light weight touring weekend saddle bag?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2015 - 4:28pm
Avenir (or similar) rack bag with drop down side 'panniers' - 20l capacity, lower cofg than saddle bag and utilises stuff (rack) you already have - oh and its cheaper!

http://www.jejamescycles.co.uk/avenir-1 ... 83300.html

Re: Ramming cyclist at only 10mph is OK

CTC Forum - On the road - 2 April 2015 - 4:19pm
Tom Richardson wrote:this incident demonstrates to me - more than anything - the ignorance and stupidity of some motorists:

first she chooses to drive illegally - with no MOT. If she doesn't recognise that she is driving illegally without an MOT then she shouldn't be driving at all.

second, she brings herself into conflict with another road user while driving illegally. Even someone with the loose morals to drive illegally would avoid highlighting the fact by bringing themselves into conflict with other road users if they had any sense.

Third, she appears to be so ignorant of her own vulnerability to claims and prosecution and/or a blinding hatred of cyclists that she goes on to deliberately drive into one with her car (while driving illegally).


She can claim against the cyclist for the alleged damage to her car door - if she can demonstrate that the cyclists did it. Meanwhile she has rightly been prosecuted for her driving and the cyclist can claim from her for repair of damage to his bike, personal injury and relevant expenses. They both might already have done that. If not I sincerely hope that they do. Whether you like it or not its how the system works. It will make good the damage to both parties and make them aware that they can't go around damaging cars or running people down without come backs. Neither of them seem to be aware of that previously.
Spot on IMHO.

BTW I very often feel the need to 'push' a vehicle away from me as a natural reaction out of fear to it being too close to me.It I suppose can seem like I've caused terrible harm to a car door as it can make a loud noise,though it does invariably mean the driver reacts by swerving away from me

light weight touring weekend saddle bag?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 2 April 2015 - 2:08pm
I've been touring for about 25 years. Mainly camping but occasionally B + Bs/ hostels.

My pattern sometimes works away and I fancied the idea of some light-weight touring weekends wild camping with a tarp, good (warmish) weather only . I was thinking of using a saddle bag.
I've just looked at the Carradice Nelson Longflap and bag man support. But this combination only weights 200 g less that my current rack with one Ortleib roller classic with a similar capacity.

Any advice on carrying about 20 litres of stuff, mostly light (sleeping bag, tarp, hammock, few clothes)?

Thanks

Re: Roads Are Not For Racing On

CTC Forum - On the road - 2 April 2015 - 12:40pm
I give up.

Re: Roads Are Not For Racing On

CTC Forum - On the road - 2 April 2015 - 12:38pm
Psamathe wrote:I recognised it as a joje (just look at the web site banner).

But then it make me start to think that if a group of motor vehicles (e.g. cars or motorbikes) did the same, would people start to object (i.e. car racing on normal transport roads in amongst the other users (including cyclists,, etc.).
Yes. But it wouldn't be "doing the same" would it? It would endanger lots of other people. It's "doing the same thing" in the same way as somebody shooting a person with a water pistol is "doing the same thing" as somebody shooting someone with a shotgun.The regulation should be proportional to the danger of the activity. I'm confident that actual cycle racing is well enough regulated in the UK. I suspect the article wasn't actually thinking of cycle races, merely groups of cyclists in lycra (which obviously means they are racing ).

Re: Roads Are Not For Racing On

CTC Forum - On the road - 2 April 2015 - 12:25pm
I recognised it as a joje (just look at the web site banner).

But then it make me start to think that if a group of motor vehicles (e.g. cars or motorbikes) did the same, would people start to object (i.e. car racing on normal transport roads in amongst the other users (including cyclists,, etc.).

Ian

Re: Roads Are Not For Racing On

CTC Forum - On the road - 2 April 2015 - 12:18pm
kwackers wrote:Vantage wrote:I'm glad someone got it.
I wonder about this forum at times.
It was obvious it was a joke from the way it was written (and the site that hosted it) although I have to admit to not really 'getting' it. After all, roads really are for transport and not for racing - so where's the joke?
Same.
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