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Re: ROSE BIKE'S UK . .

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 28 November 2014 - 6:28pm
CREPELLO wrote:mercalia wrote:Rose bikes I think the minimum postage is £7 - they use a courier. some things in Germany are considerably cheaper than the UK eg BM bottle dynamos eg £24 v £46 here.I've mentioned this several times before, but I'm consistently getting free delivery for some reason. Does nobody else?

well not me; the first purchase I made I did get a smallish back pack for free, thats all

Re: Chiltern Cycleway

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 28 November 2014 - 6:19pm
Like Al I'm not familiar with the route although It seems that I've cycled a fair bit of it over the years. I'm in N W London /Hertfordshire area and I often head out that way.

+1 for what AL says about the state of the roads. You may be OK in March if there aren't too many trees in leaf. The lovely leafy lanes that make the area so attractive for cycling can make it very difficult to spot the potholes in dappled sunshine.

I presume you've found this: http://www.chilternsaonb.org/cycleway/

Re: ROSE BIKE'S UK . .

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 28 November 2014 - 6:17pm
mercalia wrote:Rose bikes I think the minimum postage is £7 - they use a courier. some things in Germany are considerably cheaper than the UK eg BM bottle dynamos eg £24 v £46 here.I've mentioned this several times before, but I'm consistently getting free delivery for some reason. Does nobody else?

Re: news paper nutcase

CTC Forum - On the road - 28 November 2014 - 6:01pm
Hi Revolution, would this be the same free rag that recently carried the letter and subsequent predictable replies about a father riding to school with his kids and being told to ride on the cycle path? I did think of replying to that one, but apathy got the better of me.
I await to see if they print your reply next week!
I would have thought a combination of the above approaches, indicating that as the flashing lights are completly legal, they "must" have been tested to ensure that do not cause any problems to other road users, or why were they made legal.

Martin

Re: news paper nutcase

CTC Forum - On the road - 28 November 2014 - 5:01pm
Suggested response:

"Dear Sir,

Flashing and very bright lights cause problems for all sorts of users. Unfortunately, as long as the legal system continues to accept "I didn't see you" as reasonable, I'm afraid we're all stuck with them."

Re: Single Speed Freewheel Day Trips

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 28 November 2014 - 4:52pm
barrym wrote:Si wrote:
Around here - gentle to moderately rolling midland countryside - I use a 66 on the road SS (ditto on the fixie) and about 54 on the MTB. I think that 66 is pretty low (remember you can't really compare directly with the same gear on a geared bike) but I find it comfie and stress free. I've friends who ride in the high 80s quite happily.....they are chaingangy types though.

I often ride my 1x7 in a single gear just to see. I use either 3rd (50") or 4th (60"). In 3rd I can get pretty much anywhere but obviously spin out very quickly, in 4th I find quite modest inclines too much, and still do spin out just not as quickly.

Why can't you compare with a geared bike?

What are chaingangy types? I suspecting they are young fit dudes, not a sick old man like me

You'll find that the same gear on a SS as on a multi geared is a lot easier on the SS - you'll not have the chain going all the way around those horrible jockey wheels and you'll often have a straighter chain line too.

Yep, chaingangy = fit, although not necessarily young or dudes.

Re: Single Speed Freewheel Day Trips

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 28 November 2014 - 4:36pm
Si wrote:
Around here - gentle to moderately rolling midland countryside - I use a 66 on the road SS (ditto on the fixie) and about 54 on the MTB. I think that 66 is pretty low (remember you can't really compare directly with the same gear on a geared bike) but I find it comfie and stress free. I've friends who ride in the high 80s quite happily.....they are chaingangy types though.
I use 90 on mine and I certainly don't think I'm chaingangy. That said it is usually just for my commute,and I only cross the 10m contour line twice in my 8 mile trip (and one of those is going back down)

Re: Single Speed Freewheel Day Trips

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 28 November 2014 - 4:21pm
Si wrote:
Around here - gentle to moderately rolling midland countryside - I use a 66 on the road SS (ditto on the fixie) and about 54 on the MTB. I think that 66 is pretty low (remember you can't really compare directly with the same gear on a geared bike) but I find it comfie and stress free. I've friends who ride in the high 80s quite happily.....they are chaingangy types though.

I often ride my 1x7 in a single gear just to see. I use either 3rd (50") or 4th (60"). In 3rd I can get pretty much anywhere but obviously spin out very quickly, in 4th I find quite modest inclines too much, and still do spin out just not as quickly.

Why can't you compare with a geared bike?

What are chaingangy types? I suspecting they are young fit dudes, not a sick old man like me

Re: My worst tour, and why..

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 28 November 2014 - 4:13pm
I think you call it "Character building" afterwards but it can be "Soul destroying" when it happens ......

Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 28 November 2014 - 4:08pm
Wind direction is the direction the wind is coming from, in written English this is indicated by the first letter or letters of the compass directions, North, South, East, West. So with a SE wind if you ride south east the wind will be blowing directly in your face i.e. you will have a headwind. In spoken English the whole words are pronounced e.g. "a south east wind"

Your English, by the way, appears to be very good, You will have little problem making yourself understood though you may find the Scottish accent very difficult to understand but they will understand you. (Don't feel bad. Americans who think they are native English speakers have a terrible time with UK regional accents.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Points_of_the_compass Weather forecasts (and cyclists) mainly use the cardinal and ordinal points for wind direction. Hope this helps.

Pete

Re: news paper nutcase

CTC Forum - On the road - 28 November 2014 - 4:01pm
D363 wrote:Can't see anything to be gained by responding to that tripe.
It won't convert those who have formed their opinions but casual readers might take something from a considered response rather than just the purely negative anti-cyclist message they get from the original article. In the past I have found many people are interested when you actually discuss issues like road positioning, pavement cycling, RLJing, cycle lanes, hi-vis and helmets. We can't blame people for thinking these things to be black and white issues if they are always presented as such and we make no effort to challenge that.

Re: Incident this morning - City of London

CTC Forum - On the road - 28 November 2014 - 3:55pm
Injury=report to police explaining the accident and ask for an incident number so that it's registered if your injury gets worse.
I'd also contact the coach company explaining that you've reported it to the police.

If your shoulder is giving you pain and going worse go to A&E or doctors of course.

Re: news paper nutcase

CTC Forum - On the road - 28 November 2014 - 3:46pm
Can't see anything to be gained by responding to that tripe.

Re: Single Speed Freewheel Day Trips

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 28 November 2014 - 3:43pm
barrym wrote:I don't ride a SS (yet), but do yearn for that simplicity. I wondered what sort of gearing you all pull. I was talking to a guy from a shop in Wells a while back and he rides 70" <gulp>. I'd have to push it everywhere except for down hill:-(

Cheers
Barry

Around here - gentle to moderately rolling midland countryside - I use a 66 on the road SS (ditto on the fixie) and about 54 on the MTB. I think that 66 is pretty low (remember you can't really compare directly with the same gear on a geared bike) but I find it comfie and stress free. I've friends who ride in the high 80s quite happily.....they are chaingangy types though.

Re: Scotish Audax

CTC Forum - On the road - 28 November 2014 - 3:30pm
Thanks for that. I'm impressed with the weather, not to mention the ride!

Re: Chiltern Cycleway

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 28 November 2014 - 2:44pm
It comes through my village but I am not familiar with most of it. No feelings about direction, dont think it will make much difference. No off road bits here either. Sorry I can't be more helpful. This area is really great for cycling with very quiet back roads. We see lots of foreign cyclists passing through on Sustrans 5. That said the roads are terrible. I have renamed our village Puddletown.

Al

Re: news paper nutcase

CTC Forum - On the road - 28 November 2014 - 2:14pm
iviehoff wrote:Clearly cyclists like to use flashing lights because they demonstrably improve the likelihood of being spotted. They became common before they were legal, and then the government messed up the regs to make it much the easiest choice, and now everyone has them. They are as reluctant to give them up as are drivers reluctant to give up their windscreen wipers.
Well, as I said, Cateye produced a couple of models which were UK road legal in both steady and flashing modes. Cyclists and retailers weren't clambering over themselves to obtain them and they eventually dropped them (whilst still producing models for countries where people do buy them). Others do produce steady and flashing lights which are legal but few places stock them and we rarely get requests on here to recommend a set. UK Retailers and cyclists by and large are not concerned by the legalities of the lights sold and bought.

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 28 November 2014 - 2:05pm
Like this one?
Stede Hill.jpg
Caution CTC.jpg

Re: news paper nutcase

CTC Forum - On the road - 28 November 2014 - 1:54pm
Clearly cyclists like to use flashing lights because they demonstrably improve the likelihood of being spotted. They became common before they were legal, and then the government messed up the regs to make it much the easiest choice, and now everyone has them. They are as reluctant to give them up as are drivers reluctant to give up their windscreen wipers.

Epileptics who are at risk of having fits are, quite properly, banned from driving. My friend had his driving licence removed for 2 years after he had an epileptic fit, until he had demonstrated he was stable and not having further fits. If merely seeing common sights on the roads like the many kinds of legal flashing lights puts someone at a risk of a fit, then the person in question should surrender their licence.

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 28 November 2014 - 12:37pm
Hi,
Mark1978 wrote:One of the difficulties I find is especially for off road routes, knowing it exists in the first place, where it goes, and the quality of the surface therein. Quite often a path can start out as nice wide tarmac but then without notice or means of escape it's a muddy gravelly quagmire.

I have been saying that all along, but as I am well used to natural paths over Dartmoor, it bothers me less.
But on my tourer It would be nice to be warned of the grade I might expect, at worst I am happy to carry my bike a short way.

But on a dark evening I was blocked by a gate on a hill which was tied with farmers twine so I had to lift the 35 kgs above my shoulders and drop the bike further down the other side (I would probably struggle comming up the hill) bridle path no less.

I want grading and when the path is graded then its added to a national register so all info in in one searchable place.

I will take it both ways, rough when I expect it and smooth when I am in a hurry.

A local bridle path (track with mud through woodland) was tarmaced over, then gritted, then Autumn was on us , now I have it to myself as the roadies dont use it any more even after the grit, and only dog walkers frequent it.

They are rebuilding a bridge (which used to take trains now long gone, railway bridge) Bovey tracy to Mortenhampstead and are spending millions too.

If only they asked the cyclist what is most important.
I have seen and use other cycle paths where million pound bridges were put in and the after the press release with grinning faces its now derilict of regular cyclist.

Give us some readable logical signs at the very least......................
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