Feed aggregator

Re: Clipping and running

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 October 2014 - 12:23pm
[XAP]Bob wrote:And you thought *I* was jumping to conclusions - what evidence do you have that he braked,

Reduction in speed when just in front of the rider on his right.

Unfortunately this is exactly where the protocols of group riding are very important. As in do not tell somebody they are clear when you know they can not look behind to check.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 October 2014 - 12:14pm
tim-b wrote:
If you subscribe to the contrast theory then what is the correct colour for greatest vis on a longer ride...oilseed rape fields, followed by a built-up area, followed by a shady "tree tunnel"?

It's not a case of "correct colour", it's a case of realising that you're playing a losing game trying to second guess the scenery, and the visual acuity of the neighbourhood's drivers.

tim-b wrote:If drivers don't look far enough ahead, drive too quickly for their view, or just don't think, then potentially it's game over regardless of colour / lighting

Quite so.

anniesboy wrote:It seems to me to be ridiculous that much cycle clothing is black, I call it the new yellow.

The Highway Code rule 59 says cyclists should wear...

And if you look at THC closer it tells you pedestrians should be wearing pretty much the same thing (helmet excepted), yet nobody seems to bother and that isn't actually a problem (perceived or actual). And if you look at Cyclecraft it will point out that when it comes to cycling advice the Highway Code isn't actually that sharp.

anniesboy wrote:There should be no doubt that anyone unfortunate enough to be involved in any incident and not wearing appropriate clothing does so at their risk /choice.

It's clear that any cycling you do, whatever you do it in, is at your own risk. You do need to careful about banging on too much about "appropriate clothes" though, because you end up straying in to Victim Blaming territory remarkably easily. As noted, THC stresses the importance of bright/reflective clothing for pedestrians, so next thing we know someone running over children near ice cream vans is absolved because the sprog was in his Batman costume.

Mick F wrote:Spinners wrote:I just think there's more chance of a cyclist being seen by wearing brighter colours. That's all.+1

That I ride around most typically in bright (but not fluo) colours suggests that at least a part of me agrees, and I doubt there'll be much/any active disadvantage (including hi-viz) to getting seen in the overall grand scheme of things.

However, one needs to remember the risk compensation issue and always ride as if they're in DPM, and it's important to realise that people in Normal Clothes (my normal clothes are bright, but lots of folk have black ones) are actually entirely visible on the road to anyone bothering to look if they are in a position they can be seen.

When I'm teaching kids Bikeability I bring out a student in a dayglo vest, having divested myself of anything bright. I ask which of us is easiest to see. Everyone says it's the student. Then I stand in front of the student, and ask again, and it's me. And none of them have any trouble seeing me without hi-viz, even if I'd stick out even more in hi-viz. It also makes the students (hopefully) aware that even drivers looking out for them can't see them around corners, or in blind spots etc., so the "I'm lit up like a Christmas Tree, everyone can see me!" feeling doesn't take root.

More is not always better, if enough is enough. And I don't want to put off people who really don't want to ride if they have to dress up like out-takes from a H&S conference. And if people want to ride in black then it's a legitimate choice they don't need lecturing about.

Pete.

Re: Long Term Tour & Saddle Sore

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 October 2014 - 12:10pm
When I really suffered on a very long tour, I changed from a Brooks which is extremely rigid at the back to a soft vinyl saddle. The parts taking the most hammering were moved, the sore ares rested, and this helped. Ibuprofin helped too. If you are riding on bumpy surfaces this makes things ten times worse. If you have two saddles with you, you can swap them every few days and give the painful areas a rest.

Al

Re: Long Term Tour & Saddle Sore

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 October 2014 - 11:56am
Ditch the padded shorts, when I did this my saddle sore days ended.

Re: Clipping and running

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 October 2014 - 11:52am
Edwards wrote:[XAP]Bob wrote:As for team pace lines - this doesn't look like a club outing, more likely an audax/sportive style affair. You cannot assume small group conventions when you aren't in that group - you have to revert to general traffic conventions: make sure your manoeuvre is safe.

I was careful not to mention race or pace lines. However nearly all the riders were behaving as though on a club run. Not a commute so the inexperience of riding in those conditions show, the best example of this is the rider with the camera on his bike. He went alongside then braked that is a no no he should have slowed sooner.

Does not matter he got what he wanted, good video footage and his moment of fame.
And you thought *I* was jumping to conclusions - what evidence do you have that he braked, or the wanted a crash.

You might not have mentioned pace lines, but you were referring to the protocols you are familiar with when dealing with them.

This doesn't look lile an event where that familiarity can be assumed - and therefore you need to ensure that your way is clear. The forward cyclist fails to do so (correctly at any rate).

Re: Long Term Tour & Saddle Sore

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 October 2014 - 11:52am
If you're already doing your best in the hygiene department about the best thing you can do is take a couple of days off. Not always possible but its the only real cure

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 October 2014 - 11:44am
Hi

If you subscribe to the contrast theory then what is the correct colour for greatest vis on a longer ride...oilseed rape fields, followed by a built-up area, followed by a shady "tree tunnel"?

I always wear either a yellow, an orange or a white jersey; I prefer the orange one during the day because it doesn't attract hordes of little flying things from the fields, at night I prefer either yellow or white. No science, just my preference

I don't use lights during the day unless it's foggy (or similar), again it's just my preference

If drivers don't look far enough ahead, drive too quickly for their view, or just don't think, then potentially it's game over regardless of colour / lighting

Regards
tim-b

Re: Clipping and running

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 October 2014 - 10:52am
[XAP]Bob wrote:As for team pace lines - this doesn't look like a club outing, more likely an audax/sportive style affair. You cannot assume small group conventions when you aren't in that group - you have to revert to general traffic conventions: make sure your manoeuvre is safe.

I was careful not to mention race or pace lines. However nearly all the riders were behaving as though on a club run. Not a commute so the inexperience of riding in those conditions show, the best example of this is the rider with the camera on his bike. He went alongside then braked that is a no no he should have slowed sooner.

Does not matter he got what he wanted, good video footage and his moment of fame.

Re: St Malo to Narbonne

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 October 2014 - 9:53am
Hi Linda,

My wife and I are planing to ride from Narbonne to home in Oxfordshire on our tandem, so we just might meet en route.

We have done it before and went via Mazamet this time we are looking at a flatter route, we will after all have a combined age of 143.
We are doing this to "celebrate" our golden wedding anniversary.

Our plans are only outline at present as we have to be fit/well enough to do this.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 October 2014 - 9:35am
Spinners wrote:I just think there's more chance of a cyclist being seen by wearing brighter colours. That's all.+1

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 October 2014 - 9:31am
maxcherry wrote:So why do people in Hi-Viz, with lights and helmet get knocked over ?

Did I ever say they didn't?

I just think there's more chance of a cyclist being seen by wearing brighter colours. That's all.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 October 2014 - 9:21am
It seems to me to be ridiculous that much cycle clothing is black, I call it the new yellow.

The Highway Code rule 59 says cyclists should wear the following

appropriate clothes for cycling. Avoid clothes which may get tangled in the chain, or in a wheel or may obscure your lights
light-coloured or fluorescent clothing which helps other road users to see you in daylight and poor light
reflective clothing and/or accessories (belt, arm or ankle bands) in the dark.

There should be no doubt that anyone unfortunate enough to be involved in any incident and not wearing appropriate clothing does so at their risk /choice.

Re: Clipping and running

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 October 2014 - 9:14am
We certainly see him stop pedalling (probably looking back) and then start again.


As for team pace lines - this doesn't look like a club outing, more likely an audax/sportive style affair. You cannot assume small group conventions when you aren't in that group - you have to revert to general traffic conventions: make sure your manoeuvre is safe.


Just looked up the fly6 camera - 15 minute files, so off that we have a boring 40 seconds in a <60 second clip.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 October 2014 - 8:57am
pjclinch wrote:What hi-viz certainly does that started me wearing it is standing out at very long distances, but the more I thought about it the more I realised you don't get hit when folk are a long way away. I can't recall any incident (driving or riding) where I've suddenly come across a bike (or car) at short range because it wasn't a conspicuous colour (including plenty of "stealth cyclists"). I can recall those where something turned up out of a blind spot, or where my own observation had been poor.maxcherry wrote:Black stands out in daylight. It's not true that bright colours make people more aware.Two answers from me here.

We were driving home from Liskeard in September, and there's a long stretch where you can see maybe half a mile. It's a great place to get a move on and perhaps overtake slower vehicles and lorries etc.

The road was clear, I was doing about 55mph maybe 60 it was about four in the afternoon and lovely bright weather. In the distance we saw a "shape" and as we got nearer it was a cyclist dressed in mainly black. There was no problem and we gave him plenty room as we passed him, but it was only because I had my eyes peeled into the distance that I saw him. Had there been a string of vehicles, I doubt we'd have seen him quite so early.

Obviously, cyclists don't get hit by vehicles a long way off and obviously I'd have seen him eventually and early enough to be no problem, but it is nice to see that the road is clear a way off so you can plan your line.

Had he been wearing something brighter, he would have been seen for what the "shape" was.

Re: Clipping and running

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 October 2014 - 8:51am
[XAP]Bob wrote:MikeF wrote:[XAP]Bob wrote:
EDIT: Just read the description on the video:
"The guy in the silver and blue Pinarello cut-off in front of a rider and took his front wheel out. He saw the accident he caused and sped away." We don't know that from the video. That's just an opinion.

It was the description, so made by the video uploader. Now it's possible that someone else has reuploaded the video, but it'd more likely that the person posting is the camera man, and therefore has the following minute as well as seeing the guy cycle off... And he has clearly had interest in cycling videos before.

So it's a little more than a simple opinion from the video - the person making it is likely to have had access to much more information than we do.But we haven't any video evidence of that which is the crucial point. Therefore we cannot judge. Supposing the cyclist with the video camera caused the problem, and note the first cyclist appears to brake before he swerves to overtake, then he might add a comment like that to exonerate himself, and post a video to "prove" his point.

Re: A warm dry winter?

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 October 2014 - 8:45am
maxcherry wrote:MikeF wrote:GrumpyGit wrote:If I'm going to make it to Brighton next spring I shall have to keep riding through anything the winter can throw at us.

In preparation I've just bought a pair of studded tyres for my mountain bike as it is my "weapon of choice" for filthy conditions. My hybrid remains set up for relatively benign roads.

Working on the principle that it never rains when you're carrying an umbrella I'm expecting a very mild winter this year! I predict there will be fewer hours of daylight, so you might need lights.


Did you scatter some chicken bones, or dangle some seaweed to see into the future

What a splendid idea, would cat entrails help too??

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 October 2014 - 8:29am
Black stands out in daylight. It's not true that bright colours make people more aware.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 October 2014 - 8:05am
maxcherry wrote:Why does wearing black matter if I have lights on my bike?
Bright colours are for being seen in daylight.

Re: Clipping and running

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 October 2014 - 7:21am
Some very interesting comments but I wonder how many of the people saying the guy in front is at fault have ever ridden regularly with a fast passed cycling club.

Some of the first things I was told by the people I was ridding with was, never ever overlap the front wheel without telling the person in front that you are doing so.
Also do not respond to a hand signal to change road position unless you are certain that you are clear and the person can do as they indicate.
Keep your eyes forward do not look back otherwise you will run into the person in front if there is a problem.
Your brakes will not stop you in time if you are not concentrating on the bikes further forward.
Do not make any sudden movements without clearly indicating your intentions. If you get a response then the way is absolutely clear.

Unfortunately these lessons are not learnt by riders doing sportives and or charity rides. They just simply do not have the race club etiquette.
We all knew the Highway Code did not apply with regards to the other riders but the club rules did. But we road to those rules to stop this sort of thing happening.

Re: A (sort of familiar) tale

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 October 2014 - 10:10pm
Lights turn green, I'm first in the queue in the ASL taking primary. I start off quite briskly. 20 mph zone, lots of pinch points, I stay in primary.

Ford Transit behind doesn't like this and overtakes me engine screaming in second gear. He hasn't even fully completed the overtake when his right indicator goes on (at least he indicated) as he's reached the turning on the right he needs. As he slows for the turn the oncoming traffic means he pushes over on me and forces me into the gutter.

That was this morning. I'm sure there'll be something similar tomorrow.
Syndicate content

Archive

  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

Terms and Conditions