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Re: Touring Cassette

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 November 2014 - 1:16pm
Hi,
I have cycled most of dartmoor's ridable paths and the fords and unridable heather on a non compact 13 -34 x 26 36 46 and it was only two minutes before my missus phoned me on the Tour update to say Schleck had droped his chain that I unshipped with a double shift, the very first time that bike owned since 96 and the first time since the early eightes on any bike.
Last problem was a broken KMC cheapy recycled from a skip bike.

On my current skip trainer I recently took two links out of the chain as compact needs less range and even when it was longer on my fith recycled chain which I take off when I hit 1 % stretch on a broken chain (above) and no chain loss.

Like motorcycles the chain is probably the item that receives less attention but needs just so maintainance..............

Re: Front lights with a bar bag

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 November 2014 - 1:16pm
Welcome to the forum.

This subject was discussed earlier this year here.
viewtopic.php?f=22&t=85672

Re: Front lights with a bar bag

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 November 2014 - 1:14pm
If you were to get a dynamo you'd probably find this problem easier to solve, since dynamo lamps are small, lightweight and solid with no removable parts (so less likely to be damaged by the severe vibration subjected to anything mounted on the un-sprung brace of a suspension fork) and mount via a 6mm nut and bolt, for which it's possible to buy diverse ready-made brackets and relatively easy to make your own adaptations.

Battery lights on the other hand, are all made to mount on a handlebar, and assume you are some kind of sport cyclist who has nothing else on his bike, so you can't easily buy alternative fittings and those that you may nevertheless find in shops look like a kludge, with ugly bits of tube mounted on stalks - that may or may not be high enough to let your lamp shine over the top of a bar bag and if they are that high they'll catch on things whilst impeding access to said bag.

A possibly better idea is to lengthen the strap on your head-torch (that you'll want anyway in case of a puncture in the dark, certainly if this is a camping tour) and make your bar-bag wear it - on those hopefully rare occasions when you're still riding after dark. It won't be an 'approved' bike lamp, but since very few battery bike lamps are approved anyway, that's no odds.

Re: Waterproof gloves that are NOT waterproof.

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 1:00pm
At least when cycling your body temperature and circulation is helped by the exertion, motorcycling in winter can result in very cold extremities, I have never had quite such cold hands pedal cycling, even with wet through gloves, as when motorcycling (until I got heated handlebar grips which were fab).

For cycling the latest version of Aldi winter gloves are good for up to a couple of hours of continuous hard rain before the damp penetrates and even then are very warm so at the price I recommend them (but you will have to wait for next year's sale now).

Re: Touring Cassette

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 November 2014 - 12:52pm
foxyrider wrote:Another advantage of not going too big at the rear is that you can keep the chain shorter which helps prevent loosing it on rough surfaces!
Sounds like an old roadie myth to me. I've always employed the biggest sprockets available and been no stranger to rough-stuff, but so far this worker has yet to lose his chains!

Re: Touring Cassette

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 November 2014 - 12:48pm
If, as you say, you already have a MTB rear mech, a cassette that only goes to 25 teeth is borderline too small and will not shift as precisely as one with bigger big sprockets that thus come closer to the mech's guide pulley.

Ten or even nine sprockets between 11 and only 25 teeth must also necessarily be closer in size to one another, providing finer tuning than anyone needs unless they are racing at their physical limit and at a speed dictated by other riders, rather than their own preferred cadence. For normal riding, such close-ratio cassettes a bit of a nuisance, since they oblige one to shift more often than is convenient, or two gears at a time, when accelerating from the lights and adjusting speed to a changing gradient.

Now we have so many sprockets in back, as a given, simply because more gears sells bikes so that's how it must be if you want decent quality equipment, I don't know why any practical cyclist, who uses their bike as vehicle rather than a toy, bothers with anything less than the biggest cassette that'll work on their bike.

Re: I Hate Virgin Trains

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 12:44pm
iviehoff wrote:One of the reasons that trains are cheaper in other countries is that they subsidise them more comprehensively. One of the reasons they can afford that is that they often make less intensive use of trains than we do, services are actually inferior.

This is definitely true. Four years ago we went on holiday to France using trains and buses. Our last stage was Limoges to Poitiers to pick up the TGV back to Paris. On that day (which was a Monday) there were three journeys available and you can compare the two cities to say York to Derby (where there is probably 23 services a day). Not only that but a substantial amount of the journey was on a single track only. Finally on that holiday, where we probably used seven or eight train services three of them had bus replacement services.

Front lights with a bar bag

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 November 2014 - 12:38pm
I hope someone can help. i have a topeak barbag that i am going to be using on a tour. It takes up all the room though where my lights used to be and i can not use both at the same time. Has anyone had this problem and how did they get round it? I thought maybe find a light bracket mount that can fit one the front suspension forks?? But can not find any.
If anyone can help that is much appreciated.
Thanks
Deevoy88

Re: And all she got was a penalty charge notice

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 12:26pm
It doesnt take many men to take enough weight off the back wheels that you can move it with the handbrake on.

Re: And all she got was a penalty charge notice

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 12:21pm
It surprises me that it was left to bystanders to move the car. Where were the professionals for this sort of job? And I'm with mick, no handbrake?

Re: I Hate Virgin Trains

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 11:50am
Flinders wrote:Japanese trains are faster, but so are a lot of European trains, and they are far cheaper than here.
Can you really travel in Germany or France or Netherlands at the kind of prices you can pay for Advance tickets in Britain? It really is a bit more complicated than "it's cheaper elsewhere".

One of the reasons that trains are cheaper in other countries is that they subsidise them more comprehensively. One of the reasons they can afford that is that they often make less intensive use of trains than we do, services are actually inferior. I was surprised to discover that even the Netherlands has less dense railway coverage than Britain. If you want British trains to be cheaper all the time, then inevitably subsidies have to rise. And with higher subsidies, there'll be less spending on railway improvements. It's very easy to say "I'd like the government to spend more money on this" and less easy to suggest what he should spend less on in consequence.

NCN-55 Closure (Part of it anyway)

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 11:48am
I wasn't sure where to put this so if it needs moving elsewhere on the forum, no probs.

Just a heads-up to anyone using the stretch of route 55 from the A5082 Cleggs Lane in Little Hulton to the B5229 Parrin lane at Worsley Golf Club/Patricroft.
The Roe Green section is closed from under the East Lancashire Road to the M60 for 14 weeks due to resurfacing work.
I only discovered it as I ran into this...

10392539_880563781995388_8691925278964845410_n.jpg
having not seen one single warning notice from Salford Council or Urban Vision on previous rides anywhere along the route. Lovely.
Looks like I'm back to risking my neck on main roads and roundabouts for a while.
I only discovered this info after some ridiculous amount of googling ... http://www.urbanvision.org.uk/news/roe- ... rovements/

Re: Speeding cyclists on LBC now

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 10:59am
This seems to be a case of the police enforcing a law that no one knew existed -- or perhaps doesn't actually exist.

If bikes are limited to the same limits as motor vehicles in Royal Parks, that's one thing. But if we are subject to lower speed limits, this should be clear in legislation and signage. If the police are allowed to enforce laws that aren't really laws, this is seriously bad news. It becomes literally a police state.

And that's before the stupidly low limit of 5mph. I can't manouevre properly at that speed.

Re: Speeding cyclists on LBC now

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 10:51am
Mark1978 wrote:Flinders wrote:I read that the limit in this instance was 5mph, a speed at which the slightest bump would tip me over sideways onto anything alongside, which could easily include a pensioner, a child, or a dog.
I walk at 4mph on the flat, surely anyone jogging would be going faster than 5mph. And if this is where the horses go, a horse walks at 4mph or more, and trots at 6-8mph, though trotting racers go at anything up to 30mph.
Are horses allowed to trot in the park?

Even just ambling along on my bike putting in zero effort on the flat I would imagine I would be travelling in excess of 5mph. Staying below 5mph would require some effort.
Just ambling along with tandem & trailer, with an 8 year old and a 5 year old, we go 7 - 8 mph, even if Mini V puts her feet up.

Mick F wrote:I don't know how they can enforce a speed limit for a bicycle when having a speedometer isn't a legal requirement.

Do you need a speedometer to know when you are going too fast? As others state above, a speedometer isn't necessary to enforce a law. If the speedometer of your car is broken, you can still be done for speeding. You *may* avoid points if you can show that it was broken, and you have subsequently had it repaired.

Actually, the UK is the only country that I'm aware of where speed limits do not generally apply to bicycles. However, the German laws for *national* speed limits seem to say 'motor vehicles', while the laws for posted speed limits only say 'vehicles'. So it's possible that pedal cyclists do not need to comply with national speed limits in Germany, but do need to comply with posted speed limits. Most countries include cyclists indirectly by defining them as vehicles, then stating that speed limits apply to all vehicles, unless the vehicle has a lower speed limit according to it's class.

Re: Speeding cyclists on LBC now

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 10:33am
Mick F wrote:I don't know how they can enforce a speed limit for a bicycle when having a speedometer isn't a legal requirement.
It is consistent with speed limits applying to those boats and motor vehicles which are not required to have speedometers

Similarly, the limits of 35 mg of alcohol per 100 ml of breath, 80 mg per 100 ml of blood, or 107 mg per 100 mls of urine apply to drivers who are required to carry neither breathalysers nor blood or urine testing devices

In this case I think 5mph is fairly easy to judge in all honesty. I strongly suspect that they are fining those significantly exceeding the speed limit like Vine was rather than those travelling at 6 or 7. Anybody can tell the difference between 5 and 10.

Re: And all she got was a penalty charge notice

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 10:30am
Meanwhile, Communities Secretary Eric Pickles announced ....

Re: Speeding cyclists on LBC now

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 10:16am
Do they fine any children? Even a small child on a balance bike could easily break 5 mph.

Re: Why do so many people die shovelling snow?

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 10:16am
We have quite a few short 20% hills around here. I shall approach them more carefully after reading this!
My son, 34 at the time, had an episode returning from a skiing holiday in Canada. Changing flights at Toronto he had a sort of heart attack affecting his left arm etc. It was thought it related to skiing, the cold and the fact that he had a cold virus. He had cardioversion and spent 3 weeks in hospital there (good old Direct Line!).
The combination of physical effort, extreme cold and a virus is a thing to be avoided.

Al

Re: And all she got was a penalty charge notice

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 10:13am
Don't really know why it took 25 minutes either, at least it got damaged anyway, looks like a part of wheel arch trim gets knocked off. It reminds me a bit of the scene in Bruce Almighty, where there's a big queue of irate drivers stuck behind a broken down car, all it takes is for Bruce to help push it out of the way and everyone can get on their way.

Re: Speeding cyclists on LBC now

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 November 2014 - 10:08am
I don't know how they can enforce a speed limit for a bicycle when having a speedometer isn't a legal requirement.
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