Feed aggregator

Re: Advice for tyre size for touring - 32c OK for off-road?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 9:01pm
elioelio wrote:Thanks. Although I thought a wider width tyre would slow me down on roads? I know when I changed from a mountain bike to a tourer the change was immense!
See irc's post above about tyre construction.

This I would imagine accounts for the difference you felt.

I would expect a nobbly low pressure mountain bike tyre to be slower on the road.

Just as I would expect the touring tyre to struggle trying to achieve traction on sloppy mud.

It's my understanding thst it is a myth that wider tyres are slower on the road.

Some authoritative sounding industry research made this clear I think.

Possibly from scwalbe?

Re: Accomodation in Polenca, Majorca

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 8:46pm
Port de Pollença has free wifi coming out of the lampposts (not joking!) and excellent 4G coverage in the town so I wouldn't worry too much about that.

Re: Advice for tyre size for touring - 32c OK for off-road?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 8:27pm
Thanks. Although I thought a wider width tyre would slow me down on roads? I know when I changed from a mountain bike to a tourer the change was immense!
If it didn't make a difference I would get thicker tyre just to be sure. But if they are puncture resistant then maybe I don't need to worry?

Re: Accomodation in Polenca, Majorca

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 8:25pm
Aileen Brown wrote:The report from our club group just back from the P Park was that the food was fractionally better but the Wifi worse.
Well at least they have stopped charging for it, tonight it has been better than last night, thou currently in the Palms supervising Andrew watching the footie x 2 though Man Utd losing and the wifi is much better, we usually go to 1919 for the wifi.

Re: Good footwear?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 8:20pm
As with any shoes, so with cycling shoes... there's a lot more to a good fit than a simple numerical size description. Feet are a complex 3d shape and you're best off finding some made on a last that's something like your own feet. If they're not a good shape for you they'll be uncomfortable and probably inefficient too.

So while my wife's touring shoes are Shimanos they're no use to me: far too narrow in the forefoot (I'm fine in their sandals byt the lack of upper means my feet aren't constricted) and if I get them broad enough there's a huge space in front of my toes. My current ones are Diadoras, Bontragers seem to fit me okay too, but unless your feet are like mine that's not necessarily any use to you.

This means trying a load on, which isn't always easy. If there's none available nearby to try mail order a load and be prepared to send at least some of them back.

The laces only thing, not uncommon for those to have a wee velcro laces-loop to tidy them away. Worth having something though, or sooner or later the laces will be chewed and/or wound around the pedal.

Pete.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 8:15pm
Psamathe wrote:One thing I've noticed when it comes to hi-vis on narrow lanes is: Horse riders always wear hi-vis, dog walkers mostly wear hi-vis (sometimes even the dogs), cyclists mostly wear hi-vis, mothers pushing buggies never wear hi-vis.

I'd be interested to know the casualty data for mothers pushing buggies on narrow country lanes; 'cos I was very surprised when I became aware of the pattern.

Ian


There is a campaign in the New Forest for all the "wild" ponies to wear HiViz!

Then in Wales it is cows and sheep wearing HiViz

Eventually someone will come up with the idea of headlights on cars and actually driving at a speed where you can stop when you see something in your path!

Re: Help with choosing bike type and/or commute through Lond

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 October 2014 - 7:19pm
One other thing I wanted to ask. Today a bus stopped slightly in front of me a few times. Normally you can overtake it as the traffic is clear but in this case there was stationary traffic on the right. There was no space to filter on the right of that traffic. Is it generally a bad idea to filter between the traffic and the bus that has just stopped to let passengers on/off?

Re: Good footwear?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 7:19pm
Galloper wrote:You mention that you don't like cleats and use toe clips. If you want something for all round use, I'd suggest having a look at some walking shoes. Cotswold Outdoor have a good range (breathable and waterproof) starting at £40 and if you're a CTC member you get 15% discount. I have a fairly elderly pair of cross trainers that I've used for some time and they work very well on flat pedals so should suit clips. In bad weather I use a pair of lightweight walking boots.

I'd also recommend a pair of flip flops for use in a hostel or shower block. The other thing you might consider is a pair of camp slippers. They're light and cosy.

thanks for reply - I thought for while about this, but presumed either the sole wouldn't be firm enough when on the bike, or the shoe would be so firm it would be very heavy and bulky in the clips.
However, I do recall seeing some great Brasher walking shoes once that might have fitted the bill, the only thing that held me back was the price.

Thanks for the other tips too!

Re: Good footwear?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 6:59pm
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Hi,
Some shoes have laces only (older type) some have just velcro straps (normally used with clipless) some have just the one velcro across instep with laces.
The single velcro strap across the instep covers lace knot and is above the pedal clips.
With an all velcro double velcro strap shoe, the lower velcro strap tangles with the pedal clips
Ah, my hardness of understanding I note

Re: Good footwear?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 6:28pm
Hi,
Some shoes have laces only (older type) some have just velcro straps (normally used with clipless) some have just the one velcro across instep with laces.
The single velcro strap across the instep covers lace knot and is above the pedal clips.
With an all velcro double velcro strap shoe, the lower velcro strap tangles with the pedal clips

Re: Tips for your First Bicycle Tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 6:16pm
Lots of excellent suggestions there Antonio, I especially liked the generally positive and encouraging advice. I had thought you would have had lots or detailed tips on gear etc but it was refreshing to find it was mostly "seize the day and have fun"!!
A practical bit of advice I find helpful is to take and carry photocopies of passports, IDs, driving licences etc. Useful to have spare rechargeable power for phones too

Re: Rhine route?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 6:13pm
nirakaro wrote:Many thanks for that - very helpful. Look at Valle di Lei, 46deg30N 9deg27E (It is pretty tiny!). Thanks again.

Okay, i give you that!

Bizarrely the actual dam is Swiss!

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 5:36pm
Edwards wrote:Going back to the original question you need to make sure you comply with the regulations for lighting and extras in not just the countries but the State or county you are visiting.
As regards the bike itself and bike lighting, as a visitor you do not have to comply with the intricacies of local laws. A roadworthy bike with front and rear lights, a rear reflector and a bell is legal for visitors regardless of local laws. I don't think exempts you from local laws about clothing (hi-vis, h*lmets etc.) though.

EDIT: I've just come across this very helpful page on the CTC's website going into more detail on international use of bikes: http://www.ctc.org.uk/cyclists-library/ ... al-traffic

Tips for your First Bicycle Tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 5:16pm
Hey guys!

After being almost 2 years on the road, I was thinking there are so many things I wish I knew when I started so I could have done some things differently to fully enjoy my bicycle trip from the beginning. For that reason, I decided to put all those tips together in this article.

http://www.cyclingelmundo.com/47-tips-plan-first-bike-tour/


My question is. What would you add? Do you agree with these tips or just with some of them?

Thanks for sharing your experiences!

Safe travels,
Antonio

Re: Rhine route?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 4:54pm
Many thanks for that - very helpful. Look at Valle di Lei, 46deg30N 9deg27E (It is pretty tiny!). Thanks again.

Re: Getting AROUND the Pyranees

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 3:40pm
The mountain roads are, generally, fairly gentle gradients that you can just plod up as long as you have a suitable gear.

I was just looking at my Garmin stats for the Bordeaux to Barcelona (via Bagnères-de-Luchon) ride I did in 2011.

The first day out of Bordeaux was 45 miles and I logged at total of 2486ft of ascent with the highest point being 360ft above sea level.

The third day (selected purely because of the distance ridden - it wasn't anything particularly out of the ordinary) was 41 miles and 3140 ft of ascent. Rolling countryside with several crossings of river valleys but with only one hill topping out above 800ft, recorded at 857ft, so we weren't in mountainous terrain.

B2B day 3.JPG
The highest day in the middle (8th day- but 7th riding day - of 11 days)s) of the ride we did 41 miles and 3634 ft of ascent - the highest point on that day was ~6800ft (the Port de la Bonaigua, 2072m). We started the day at nearly 3,800ft and it was basically 10 miles of steady climb which took me about an hour and 40 minutes of riding time (I was doing a fairly constant 5 to 6 mph) from the start and the rest of the day was pretty much all downhill.

B2B day 8.JPG

Note the different vertical scales

You can get to Bagnères-de-Luchon without going over anything very major (although we did the Port de Balles - classed as HC on the TdF). From there to Barcelona you can just bump over steady, but quite long, climbs most of the way.

First time I rode in the Pyreness I found that the prospect was much worse than they turned out to be in practice - we were riding down to Barcelona from Cherbourg.

The only thing about the mountains is the weather can sometimes be unpredictable but I've found the Spanish side of the Pyrenees tends to generally do better than the French side.

Rick.

Re: Lighting a bike/high vis on tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 3:03pm
tatanab wrote:Remove the bar bag and sling it over your saddle bag by its shoulder strap and secure with a bungee or similar if need be. Your bars are then free for the light. I seldom need a light when on tour, if I do it is usually only for a few miles, so this works for me even if it is a little inconvenient.jpg

Thanks, I was thinking of just doing this. I've just bough a second hand Gopro too so would need to take off the bag if I want to film from the handlebars anyway, so should be used to it.

simonhill wrote:Don't worry mate, it'll be raining all the time in NZ, so its the colour of your rain top that is important. Cue another 5 pages!!

Can't wait! My jackets a sky blue/lake colour (thought I'd go crazy and buy something not black or grey) so I should blend in nicely...

Re: A (sort of familiar) tale

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 October 2014 - 2:41pm
Well, here in the States for the moment (with car), guys are overtaking each other on either side with complete abandon. Apparently it's not against the law over here. As far as using the roads is concerned, I'll be jolly glad to be back in Blighty tomorrow (and back on the bike ). There are worse things....

Play on Pedals training Al-Meezan

Play on Pedals blog - 20 October 2014 - 2:17pm

Play on Pedals spent last Wednesday with women and children from Al-Meezan, an Islamic Community Centre in the Drumbreck area of Glasgow.

Al-Meezan caters for a huge variety of groups and users, from mother and toddler sessions, a creche, prayer groups and educational classes for women and young people. The non-profit organisation recently secured funding from the Climate Challenge Fund to improve the centre’s carbon emissions and develop some sustainable transport initiatives. A survey carried out by the staff at the centre made it clear that not many users were taking to the roads on bikes, choosing instead to use their cars for almost all journeys.

As a result they have committed a team of Climate Change champions, headed by Sghufta Anwar, to develop ways to promote more sustainable lifestyle choices for users of the centre. One initiative has been the introduction of cycling classes for women. Delivered by the Glasgow Bike Station women have been receiving weekly bike lessons in the nearby Bellahouston Park and this has sparked an interest in expanding cycling for all ages…

Play on Pedals has therefore started work with the climate challenge team and other volunteer mothers, training them as instructors to deliver the games and activities to their children attending the nursery.

Last week, we met with volunteers for a morning in Bellahouston Park, followed by an afternoon in their large multipurpose hall with lots of children. The children were so excited to be getting on their bikes and having a whizz around the hall and it was great to have mothers there watching these first steps with their children.

We will be heading back to Al-Meezan next week to have a look at more games and activities that volunteers can introduce to the nursery children but in the meantime, here are some lovely photos from the day.


Re: Rhine route?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 October 2014 - 2:10pm
Not sure which bit of the Rhein rises in Italy, all the maps i've ever seen the source is firmly in Switzerland with input from Austria being the first non Swiss addition to the flow!

But back to the real question. The Neckar wobbles about quite a bit, once upstream of Heidelberg places of interest are not abundant and it of course passes through an extensive industrial area from Heilbronn to south of Stuttgart. From there to the source there are quite a few nice towns however in common with the whole length campsites are thin on the ground and i'd advise booking in high season - i've seen people on bikes turned away on occasion! Here is a link to the official website http://www.neckarradweg.de/neckarindex.html - i used the Bikeline guide when i've ridden it (most of the length over two different trips.)

The upper Danube (Donau in German) is fairly bland but with some nice castles and interesting geology. I rode upstream from Ulm to Donaueschingen over 2 days but 3 would have been more comfortable! Again, there isn't a lot of camping available and being quite popular other accomodation can be a bit pricey. Ulm is a typical German city, shops, Dom and railway station but nothing particularly exciting! It is however quite a lot north east of Bodensee (Lake Constance) - far enough for its own Esterbauer guide!

I actually found the Rhein better in terms of stuff to see and accomodation than Neckar or upper Donau - from Basel to Konstanz is for the most part very pleasant, nicely spaced and good supply of camping. I'd consider a bit of a hybrid of your idea taking out the 300km or so Ulm diversion instead taking the Donau to Tuttlingen or Sigmaringen then going south via Stockach to Bodensee. Or follow the Rhein to Karlsruhe before leaving to cross over to Stuttgart via Pforzheim to pick up the Neckar after the industrial stuff. TBH i caught a train for a few miles to avoid riding through Heilbronn last month 7 euros well spent!

if you want sightseeing or accomodation tips just ask
Syndicate content

Archive

  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

Terms and Conditions