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Re: Daytime red flashing lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 January 2016 - 11:26pm
I took to using drl's sometime in 2014, usually as the evening started to draw in. I took the view that if Volvo thought it a good idea for a big hefty car to be more visible, then it sure as **** made sense for a bike to be lit up.
Soon as I had the dynamo's, they were on constantly. I don't feel the need to dress in hi-viz day-glo sam browne everything and indeed most of my "I'm a proper cyclist" lycra gear is as black as black can be, but the lights I feel are a necessary evil these days.
They cost me not a jot to run and so that's a plus in my case.
I can't see drl's on other road vehicles disappearing any time soon and as much as I hate the phrase, if you can't beat them, join them.

Re: Daytime red flashing lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 January 2016 - 11:02pm
As Bicycler suggested, this sounds like a slight confusion of rule 2 (walk facing traffic - when alone or in small groups) and rule 5 (large groups keep left, and use lights at the front and back when it's dark). That's still what I'd teach Scouts, though in practice we wouldn't really walk them on roads without verges, or in large groups - so they'd be on the verge facing the traffic. It doesn't matter so much if you're on the verge, but it's good training. We only really use verges to get between two public footpaths that meet the same road a few hundred metres apart.

I may have misremembered which side of the road we walked on 40 years ago! I do remember the explanation about a slow vehicle so maybe we did walk on the left.

All the contributions have been very interesting and food for thought. I'm not sure what I'll do when I'm out next!

Re: Touring in Rutland/Leicestershire

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 January 2016 - 10:58pm
I live on the northern edge of the Vale of Belvoir in Bingham, at the junction of the A46 and A52. I do a lot of riding in the area you are looking at, although I ride down from the north to get there.

You can do a circuit of Rutland Water itself. It's about 25 miles round and there is a rideable path for most of it. Several cafes around the shoreline.

There's a lovely cafe at the old windmill in Wymondham, just to the east of Melton Mowbray. Other cafes in the Vale itself include Dove Cottage, on the canal between Harby and Plungar. The Cakehole cafe at Barrowby near Grantham. The area around Belvoir castle is very nice and quite hilly to the south of the castle. There's a delightful ride via Harston, Knipton, Eaton and Branston. There's another cafe at the Fishing Lakes near Scalford, just north of Melton and yet another at Asfordby Hill (Alpine Cafe).

The whole area north of Rutland Water to the A52 is filled with lightly trafficked little lanes and a great place to ride. Most of the traffic travels on the A roads, so other roads are quiet.

You can also ride on parts of the Grantham Canal, which winds its way through the Vale of Belvoir. Further east and south, Woolsthorpe by Colsterworth is the Birthplace of Sir Isaac Newton and you can visit the house where he lived, with the famous Apple tree in the garden.

Stamford is a nice olde worlde town worth a visit. There are also some nice lanes to the west of Oakham and a cyclists cafe at Tugby ( Cafe Ventoux). Many of the local roads round Oakham are used for the Rutland to Melton Cicle Classic race.

You could even venture north of the A52 as far as Newark on Trent. Nice cafes at Bottesford (Little Jacks garden centre) and Long Bennington (Cafe 52 opposite the Co-op). Newark itself had several nice cafes if you venture that far north (Gannets and Feeling Peckish near the castle). The Castle and the Civil War Museum are worth a visit.

If you need any more detail, let me know.

Re: Calais

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 January 2016 - 10:35pm
There certainly have been problems with migrants trying to get on the ferries, but I've not heard of any attacks on tourists, cycling or otherwise. As things are at the moment, I would not be worried.

Re: Calais

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 January 2016 - 10:29pm
I caught the Calais - Dover returning from the Alps in August. I actually went looking for the 'migrant problem' because I had a few hours to kill, but I couldn't find hide nor hair of any of the type of things being shown on the news. I think it's been blown vastly out of proportion by the media.

Re: Week-long tour in the W/N-W of Ireland. Top tips please!

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 January 2016 - 9:44pm
Those are great tips! Thank you!

Re: Russia

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 January 2016 - 9:37pm
A few random points I would repeat or add to the previous useful information. (I haven't cycled there but have been to various parts visiting my Russian wife's family).

Visa has to be applied for in person, in London or Edinburgh - a pain if these places are not handy for you. You need to leave your passport. You also need evidence of where you will stay in Russia. One way of doing this is to book a hotel via booking.com or a similar site. You should be able to find a hotel which will provide you with a valid invitation for a few pounds, and which will allow you to cancel a booking. If you don't want to stay in the hotel, get and print the invitation and then cancel your booking. Cost for a single-entry 30 day visa is roughly £85, plus around £10 to return passport and visa by secure post (or you can collect it in person a few days after applying). More detail here. Google will find agencies who will do all this for you, for around £50 extra; I have no experience of these.

Major roads in the west of Russia IME are not much worse than ours in UK, but minor roads are pretty rough. Driving standards are not great, but MUCH better than 20 years ago when (in Moscow at least) drivers would deliberately aim at anyone who stepped off the kerb, and the wrong side of a dual carriageway was seen as a convenient way of bypassing congestion. Nowadays drivers are more likely to be careless than malicious. Outside cities (which tend to sprawl - there is so much land available) there is generally less traffic than here.

You see a few cyclists in urban areas, but I don't recall seeing any in really rural parts.

Outside major cities, very few people speak anything other than Russian.

It's fairly easy to change Euros and USD, but GBP are difficult outside major cities.

Putin really is popular with most Russians: the standard of living has improved greatly uder his rule, and the general view of the adventures in Georgia and Ukraine seems to be that these places should really be part of Russia anyway, so the military have every right to be there. It may irritate you, but I'd strongly advise keeping quiet about that unless you are sure your are in sympathetic company.

Calais

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 January 2016 - 9:31pm
I'm planning to get the ferry back from Calais to Dover on the return from a cycle tour. I'm just wondering did anyone experience any difficulties with the migrant situation last year - and did you feel vulnerable/threatened on a bike? Is Calais probably best avoided?

Re: Daytime red flashing lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 January 2016 - 9:07pm
OldGreyBeard wrote:I've noticed quite a few bikes with red flashing rear lights switched on in daytime. This is in good weather.
Is this becoming standard practice?
What do people think about it?


Actually I've become one of those myself recently. Mainly because I'm commuting in the pen-umbra of dawn and dusk but also I've become more aware of not wanting to dress like a hi-viz construction worker to ride my bike; I now wear jeans and an ordinary overcoat.

I fully endorse everything Mark says in his post today https://aseasyasridingabike.wordpress.c ... ment-35230

My transition from 'fluorescent lycra-clad cyclist' to 'person' has left me feeling a bit vulnerable and my LED lights are my way of coping. Maybe in time I'll be able to switch them off.

Re: Daytime red flashing lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 January 2016 - 8:39pm
Sorry, rather hogging the conversation here.

However, back on topic. The thing that really bothers me is that it seems to me that the ideal day for driving/cycling safely is a clear day with no low, blinding sun. That's because of the even lighting.

DRLs are the antithesis of this. They encourage us all to change mode to watching out for anything with lights attached. This seems a bit tough on pedestrians, horse-riders, dogs, trees and anything else around the road environment that would not normally carry lights. It's a compromise that we have to make at night, but I don't like the idea of doing it in the day-time. And I suspect it works well specifically because few people currently do it, so you're shouting "Look at me!" Once everyone is shouting just as loud (except the pedestrians and trees), you'll just have uneven lighting, with some blinding lights, on what should have been a really good day for visibility.

Re: Daytime red flashing lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 January 2016 - 8:33pm
[Thread Drift]Bicycler wrote:... It was back in the era when you could trust teenage Scouts to use their common sense. Just occasionally one of us might pop along and check but we were generally impressed with their behaviour. Some kids respond very well to trust and responsibility. I sometimes wonder if we fail to give them the opportunity these days
Depends. We do "parachute drops" that involve Patrols of Scouts walking unescorted (though with frequent check points). We take part in County camps where there are leaders around, but not immediately present or supervising, while Scouts prepare and cook food and generally camp. One of the awards for which they are aiming, by age 14, is an overnight expedition in which they check in with a leader from time to time, but are expected to navigate and look after themselves. The next section up (14-18) get dumped in teams once a year on Dartmoor, the North Wales hills, the Peak District or somewhere else they've never been before, and navigate around bases completing various challenges.[/Thread Drift]

Re: Daytime red flashing lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 January 2016 - 8:26pm
OldGreyBeard wrote:Back in the 1970s when I was in the Scouts, when we did night hikes we were told to carry a white light at the front and a red one at the back as a line of 5 or more people was considered to be a vehicle. We also walked along facing the oncoming traffic as per the Highway Code. I've no idea if that is still the practice. My daughter's Guide troop don't do nights hikes.
As Bicycler suggested, this sounds like a slight confusion of rule 2 (walk facing traffic - when alone or in small groups) and rule 5 (large groups keep left, and use lights at the front and back when it's dark). That's still what I'd teach Scouts, though in practice we wouldn't really walk them on roads without verges, or in large groups - so they'd be on the verge facing the traffic. It doesn't matter so much if you're on the verge, but it's good training. We only really use verges to get between two public footpaths that meet the same road a few hundred metres apart.

The principle of facing the traffic is obvious - you get more warning to throw yourself in the hedge. For large groups, remember that the drivers are supposed to be able to stop in the distance that they can see to be clear. A large group is the size of a (very) slow vehicle, so ought to be moving in the same direction as one.

On sharp bends, you need to consider whether it's better to be on the outside of the bend irrespective of side of the road (rule 2).

Re: Horrifying hit-and-run in Brighton

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 January 2016 - 8:23pm
If you have a Chubb style lock that takes takes a traditional looking key based on a round shaft do not leave it in the lock on the inside of your door. Even if it's a rear door without a cat flap or letter box for a burglar to reach through to get the key you can easily get in. There's a technique that requires about 20 seconds at most, then you leave it for a while, possibly while you are doing the same for the next house. After some time you go back and simply open the door, commit the burglary then lock the door and leave the key on the inside of the door.

This method then causes the homeowner a bit of an issue with the insurer since there's almost no evidence of how the burglar got in and out when the door's locked. You probably know this method but I'll not describe it further for obvious reasons. All I can say is I used to live on a little estate consisting of cul-de-sacs that had at least 4 houses hit on one afternoon. Someone saw them but a white van with confident men working away moving things into the van can look very normal without cause to suspect a burglary is going on.

Re: Daytime red flashing lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 January 2016 - 8:20pm
There is a piece of advice in the Highway Code which, if it was to be followed, would eliminate the need for all these agonised discussions on hiviz or lights.

The writers of the H.C. thought it so important that they say it twice, in paragraphs 126 and 154.

Drive at a speed that will allow you to stop well within the distance you can see to be clear.

Make sure you can stop within the distance you can see to be clear.

I mention this not to say that it means we should not need to try to be so conspicuous. I mention it because it hardly ever gets mentioned when cyclists are so often told that they are being foolhardy if they don't use hiviz etc.

It is my impression that very few drivers actually stick to this commonsense advice. When I have brought up 126 and 154 on online forums motorists explain why it is impractical or even impossible to obey this rule.

I would be surprised but very pleased if people like Meg Hillier M.P., vicechair of the All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group, were to start publicising this advice, and telling drivers to obey it. But no, she sticks to telling cyclists to dress up.

https://aseasyasridingabike.wordpress.com/2016/01/27/invisibility/

Re: Daytime red flashing lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 January 2016 - 8:12pm
Even pedestrians should be wearing the right sort of clothes. http://www.sussexsaferroads.gov.uk/info/safer-for-other-users/pedestrian-visibility
Notice cyclists and equestrians are also referred to as "other users" as well as pedestrians.

Re: Daytime red flashing lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 January 2016 - 8:05pm
iviehoff wrote:reohn2 wrote:Which would be even considered as an acceptable defence in a court of law,in the same way some travesties of justice are being passed by courts against cyclists ATM.Just recently an HGV driver was totally absolved of blame when he ran over and killed a well lit Hi Viz wearing cyclist in a rainstorm,his excuse being that he didn't expect to there to be a cyclist on that road
Do you have a citation for that? Was it a jury trial? It tends to be juries that acquit in such cases, not lawyers, assuming you have given us all the important salient facts of the case.
http://www.ctc.org.uk/news/20151113-lorry-driver-expected-cyclist-road-says-coroner

Re: Horrifying hit-and-run in Brighton

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 January 2016 - 7:52pm
Interesting concept, this, about bystanders 'freezing' and not rushing to help. Luckily the victim is reportedly getting over his trauma.

It's got to be extraordinarily unusual for me (being an atheist) to make mention of such a religion-oriented radio programme as Thought For the Day, but by pure chance I happened to find myself drowsily half listening to today's offering, from the Chief Rabbi, instead of switching off as I usually do. Having this dreadful incident on my mind, I was aroused by his talking about the very topic. Worth a listen.

1999 Dawes Super Galaxy 64cm British Built

CTC Forums - Bikes For Sale - 27 January 2016 - 7:39pm
DSC06762.JPGHere we have my beloved Dawes Super Galaxy in British Racing Green, bought brand new in 1999 from Stonehenge cycles via special order because of the size.
The bike is set up for me in the photo, I'm 6ft 6ins to give you some idea of size. 64cm ctt along the seat tube and 58cm ctc along the top tube.
Frame is good old Reynolds 531 of course, in excellent condition considering it's age, it has been touched in plenty of times but there are no dents.
The seatpost moves up and down no problem and so does the handlebar stem.
The wheels were handbuilt by Mercian cycles, Shimano XTR hubs laced with 36 spokes to black Mavic Open Pro rims, in excellent, used condition, incredibly strong, have never needed any repair and were VERY expensive when new.. Vittoria Rubino Pro 700x23c tyres in used but okay condition. Cassette is Shimano XT 11-32t 9 speed, has done approx 2000 miles as have the chain and chainrings.
Saddle is classic San Marco Rolls in excellent order. (I never got on with a Brooks).
SKS P35 mudguards fitted in March last year, in excellent condition.
Gears and brakes are original Deore LX. The chainrings are 22/32/44t and the jockey wheels in the rear mech were brand new Shimano items approx 6 months ago.
Shimano bar end shifters working well.
The cantilevers do need attention front and rear as they are not really working properly although I have been using the bike to ride to work as usual.
The original Deore LX headset also needs attention, possibly replacing although as I say I have been riding the bike everyday.
Shimano UN54 (I think) bottom bracket fitted brand new 6 months ago.
Handlebar tape needs replacing.
Comes complete with original rear carrier and front low riders, although not fitted.
This bike has a surprising turn of speed and I've always taken great pleasure in showing the carbon fibres a clean pair of heels in our club's fast Sunday run!
It breaks my heart to sell it really but I have a new cyclocross bike now and sadly don't have the space to keep both.
Pedals not included.
Far too good to break.
Please contact me via this website.
Sorry but I'm not prepared to ship it so it's cash on collection only, I'm in Taunton, Somerset.
£210.
Categories: Go Cycling

Re: Daytime red flashing lights

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 January 2016 - 7:35pm
iviehoff wrote:reohn2 wrote:Which would be even considered as an acceptable defence in a court of law,in the same way some travesties of justice are being passed by courts against cyclists ATM.Just recently an HGV driver was totally absolved of blame when he ran over and killed a well lit Hi Viz wearing cyclist in a rainstorm,his excuse being that he didn't expect to there to be a cyclist on that road
Do you have a citation for that? Was it a jury trial? It tends to be juries that acquit in such cases, not lawyers, assuming you have given us all the important salient facts of the case.

I thought it was on the lenient sentences thread but can't find it.
It was reported on here somewhere though IIRC,I don't know if it was a jury or not

If anyone remembers it could they post a link to it please

Re: America: the bizarre

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 January 2016 - 7:10pm
My friends in Maine emailed me today. I have been advised not to visit any of the Midsomer villages that surround where I live.

Al
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