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Re: First time this year camera on bike - and an incident!

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 April 2015 - 8:17pm
Sadly I agree as this is the most common incident I encounter. I've had drivers crash into the keep left bollard next to me, brake so late that I've been able to rest a hand on the car bonnet and more amusingly I've seen at least two drivers left stranded having come to a dead stop facing the bollard whilst following motorists undertake them!

My most effective solution is to move to primary and wobble a bit well before the pinch point

Re: First time this year camera on bike - and an incident!

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 April 2015 - 8:07pm
Phil Fouracre wrote:Too common! Had it happen to me a few weeks ago, so bad that the car had to stop to avoid hitting the islandSame thing happened to me just before a roundabout. Speed of the car was fairly slow 20-25mph? as it was in a 20mph zone. However the driver gave a loud blast on the horn, just to prove he/she wasn't in the wrong and it was my fault for cycling on the road even though he/she should have seen me 100yds or more beforehand.

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 7:34pm
...to no avail.

evidently you didn't google enough

"When Julius Caesar defeated the Numidian king Juba in 46 BCE, among the spoils he took were 22 camels."
"The Emperor apparently had a much friendlier relationship with the Sultan's successor, for according to the medieval historian al-Maqrizi, Dawit sent 22 camels laden with gifts to Berkuk, the first Sultan of the Burji dynasty."
"Dressed as a Bedouin she took with her a caravan of 22 camels to carry her baggage. "

Re: Proper Tour of Scotland

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 7:22pm
+1 for the Ardrossan/Cambeltown boat and go clockwise from there. The prevailing wind is south westerly, but in my experience, you'll never go if you wait for a month with favourable winds. Our weather is what it is, and ye just need to bite the bullet and set a date. I went for a weeks pedal round the small islands near Oban at the start of June in 2013.....the first few days were like February!!! What can ye do? Interesting tour though

Re: YHA Hindhead gone!

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 7:19pm
My first hostel was Tanners Hatch (as for many people I expect). My second was Holmbury, my third Ewhurst Green, my fourth Hindhead and yes, you've guessed, my fifth was Milford. This was the old Surrey circuit (almost) walkable with a little hitch-hiking. I did it when I was sixteen. The walking circuits still exist in the Lakes and so forth but it's the cycling links elsewhere that have disappeared.

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 7:19pm
reohn2 wrote:22 camels(great handle BTW)
What does it mean? I Googled it a few days ago to no avail.

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 7:17pm
531colin wrote:OK, I edited my post for clarity....

No worries Colin

Re: Ramming cyclist at only 10mph is OK

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 April 2015 - 7:12pm
danhopgood wrote:Kwackers,

Well done for contributing to the CDF and Michael Mason case - making me feel I ought to do the same. However, sorry, but I just can't agree that cyclists breaking the law themselves will do anything get drivers to behave better. That route is a race to the bottom and a very dark and scary place it'd be - in my view.
I don't really follow why you'd think that to be true.
People avoid punishment. If you got close enough to a cyclist to get a kick most folk would give them a wide berth, why would that not be the case?

Fundamentally though whilst I agree with your statement in principle I'm also beginning to think that without some form of direct action nothing will change, particularly having read all the bumf on the Daniel Squire case.

The basic problem is the system is broken, isn't going to get fixed and turning the other cheek won't help. So until someone comes up with a 'proper' (i.e. workable) solution then simply saying "don't do it, it's wrong" isn't enough.

Re: YHA Hindhead gone!

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 6:55pm
I recall trying to get into Tanner's Hatch several times in the early 70s. Only once was I able to stay, being turned away on other occasions because it was packed with a London crowd who had "discovered" the hostel and filled it every weekend. From the one time I stayed there I have vague memories of a charming little hostel with 3 tier bunks. Having been turned away I went to Milford (closed in the early 70s) which was a pain since I'd always have ridden at least 60 miles to get to Tanner's Hatch. But I suppose that as a young chap the extra miles did me good. I always preferred the simple hostels. I stopped hostelling in 1986 when the demise of rules and the growth in motor borne visitors put me off.

Re: YHA Hindhead gone!

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 6:38pm
horizon wrote:I stayed at Hindhead when I was 16 and I last stayed there a couple of years ago, a span of over 40 years. It was magic the first time, still delightful the last time. I thought it was one of the YHA's iconic pin-up hostels that they would keep whatever it cost just to show that they still cared. Obviously not.

Well I suppose Tanners Hatch nr Dorking is very similar - an old workers cottage in the back of beyond. Hindhead closed just a day or 2 ago. I suppose not many people went there any more - that means the car brigade. This, the increasing prices and the loss of hostels where you can camp is quite depressing. I use the yha less and less. I think the yha should lose its charity status, too many people turn up there with cars that cost a pretty penny, who are looking for a bargain?

Re: Has technology changed touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 6:10pm
Vantage wrote:DarkNewt wrote:
When they can get robots to do every job what will happen to the workforce then.... probably cycle touring till they are 1000

They'll starve to death because they'll be out of work, there'll be no benefits system as the tories will have wiped it out and food banks will be out of stock. If they don't starve to death, they'll freeze to death as bedroom tax will have forced them from their homes. Those who had bikes will have sold them to buy food along with whatever camp/tour gear they had and Cameron, Smith and Osbourn will be sitting by the fire eating steak and laughing their ***** off at the mass suicides from depression and hopelessness.

Hi Bill, i hadn't quite thought of it that way somehow cheer up doesn't cover it!

Re: YHA Hindhead gone!

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 6:10pm
Sad day, parking at Hindhead; wasn't an issue if you arrived by bike Lovely hostel.

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 6:09pm
OK, I edited my post for clarity....

Re: Ramming cyclist at only 10mph is OK

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 April 2015 - 6:06pm
danhopgood wrote:Kwackers,

Well done for contributing to the CDF and Michael Mason case - making me feel I ought to do the same. However, sorry, but I just can't agree that cyclists breaking the law themselves will do anything get drivers to behave better. That route is a race to the bottom and a very dark and scary place it'd be - in my view.
Well said.

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 6:03pm
531colin wrote:22camels wrote:interesting numbers reohn2.

You are right that my saddle is 80mm higher than yours even though my inseam is only 15mm longer. My BB to saddle-top distance parallel to ST should be 777mm according to Lemond, but I have it 43mm longer than that - highest I can get away with without rocking hips etc. - it feels fine (I have size 46 feet). Yours should be 764mm by Lemond, but you say you have it 34mm lower than that at 730mm. Net that's a difference of 77mm just due to me being above Lemond, and you being below. Add that to the 15mm difference that you would expect based on our different inseams, and you get 92mm, which is spot on (820 - 730 = 90).......

....You may be missing a couple of things here. R2's saddle is further back, this moves the saddle away from the pedals just as raising it does.
Lemond was world class. I imagine his fit system is designed to get elite athletes into a racing tuck. Even though they have no beer belly to get in the way, they need the saddle forward in order to get low over the bars, if you can pedal hard enough the reaction supports your torso. If you are young, fit, and injury-free with good biomechanics (no tight hamstrings, no joint problems) then you can pedal smoothly through the bottom even with a high saddle. For a recreational cyclist, everything pivots back around the BB.....saddle back and down, bars back and up. Much more weight on the saddle, athletes put their weight on the pedal!
In my view the right saddle height for a recreational cyclist is where you need to slide back a bit on the saddle if you need to get maximum push for a while to crest a rise without changing down, or whatever.....you can watch the climbers in the tour doing just that. Having the saddle a bit lower than the athletes' maximum power height gives a bit of slack for those days that aren't quite your best day.
I agree but don't see what I'm missing,people ride differently.
I was merely point out to 22 camels(great handle BTW) what appeared to me to be a huge difference between his and my saddle position for not much difference in leg length.

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 5:55pm
531colin wrote:reohn2 wrote:..............,problem solved and the grips are nearer to the saddle than the hoods are on my drop barred bikes
But then I don't spend more than 31/2 to 4 hours in the saddle on that bike.
That said,I like the drops in a position where I can ride them most of the time,on or (mild)off road,getting the tops up higher than the saddle provides me with that comfort.

Everybody is different....your "problem solved" is a problem created for me.....I want the same reach on all my bikes.
That's OK we just differ
Similarly, as far as I'm concerned, the drops are for headwinds or occasionally for chasing somebody down. (I'm not too old yet!) I can't think why you would want to ride most of the time in the lowest position of what, about 4 workable positions with drops?
If it works for you, great, but its not "the answer" for me...
The reason I ride mostly on the drops is that it's very comfortable for me,I won't everyone with my health issues,but it works for me
BTW I see more people who can't,never mind won't,ride on the drops for more than a few minutes at a time and even then they'de need to be freewheeling,which is all down to race position bike fit due to short/cut off steerers,for not very race fit riders

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 5:51pm
22camels wrote:interesting numbers reohn2.

You are right that my saddle is 80mm higher than yours even though my inseam is only 15mm longer. My BB to saddle-top distance parallel to ST should be 777mm according to Lemond, but I have it 43mm longer than that - highest I can get away with without rocking hips etc. - it feels fine (I have size 46 feet). Yours should be 764mm by Lemond, but you say you have it 34mm lower than that at 730mm. Net that's a difference of 77mm just due to me being above Lemond, and you being below. Add that to the 15mm difference that you would expect based on our different inseams, and you get 92mm, which is spot on (820 - 730 = 90).......

22 camels
....You may be missing a couple of things here. R2's saddle is further back, this moves the saddle away from the pedals just as raising it does.
Lemond was world class. I imagine his fit system is designed to get elite athletes into a racing tuck. Even though they have no beer belly to get in the way, they need the saddle forward in order to get low over the bars, if you can pedal hard enough the reaction supports your torso. If you are young, fit, and injury-free with good biomechanics (no tight hamstrings, no joint problems) then you can pedal smoothly through the bottom even with a high saddle. For a recreational cyclist, everything pivots back around the BB.....saddle back and down, bars back and up. Much more weight on the saddle, athletes put their weight on the pedal!
In my view the right saddle height for a recreational cyclist is where you need to slide back a bit on the saddle if you need to get maximum push for a while to crest a rise without changing down, or whatever.....you can watch the climbers in the tour doing just that. Having the saddle a bit lower than the athletes' maximum power height gives a bit of slack for those days that aren't quite your best day.

Re: Has technology changed touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 April 2015 - 5:51pm
DarkNewt wrote:
When they can get robots to do every job what will happen to the workforce then.... probably cycle touring till they are 1000

They'll starve to death because they'll be out of work, there'll be no benefits system as the tories will have wiped it out and food banks will be out of stock. If they don't starve to death, they'll freeze to death as bedroom tax will have forced them from their homes. Those who had bikes will have sold them to buy food along with whatever camp/tour gear they had and Cameron, Smith and Osbourn will be sitting by the fire eating steak and laughing their ***** off at the mass suicides from depression and hopelessness.
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