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Re: Is This The First Road Rage Death?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 July 2015 - 12:44pm
Not the first - but scary all the same. I often drive, and sometimes cycle, along stretches of the A24, though that particular section is less familiar to me. Most of the time, the traffic is - more or less as you'd expect on a trunk D/C. Busy, but not usually murderous.

I hope they catch the perpetrator - soon.

Re: "How many times must a rider fall off...?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 July 2015 - 12:24pm
Did you cycle much as a child?
How many times have you fallen off in the last 8 years (not counting the recent ones you've described)?
Have you fallen off more frequently in the last 3 years, i.e. since your stroke?

Many of us have ridden since we were children and learned the hazards of wet corners, gritty corners, brake failure in the wet (think chrome rims!), and how to manage rear wheel skids and do slow speed tight turns at an age when we didn't have far to fall and just bounced without much damage.

Experience helps a lot - you have now learned to take care on wet roads, make sure your clothes and shoes don't catch, and be extra careful with tight turns (maybe take your feet out of the clips first). I fell off a few years ago on a converted railway path running through woodland: I steered off the edge of the tarmac to avoid a large branch which had come down in a recent gale, thinking that the verge was solid earth. It was soft leaf mould and my narrow-ish front wheel sunk right in -- it was like being caught in a tramline. I had been riding slowly and carefully but that was a hazard that I hadn't thought of before.

Remember too that some tyres are worse than others in the wet, and that bikes handle differently. Just because one person can do a very tight turn on their bike doesn't mean that you can do it on your one.

Re: Indicators, the lost art?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 July 2015 - 12:21pm
I didn't mean that to sound like I'm doing too many things in the wrong order. I simply meant that say for example you're travelling downhill and wishing to turn right. Then I will look back, give right hand signal and either have to use back brake only...... or retract hand signal to use front brake( for better braking effect ). A car has the advantage once the indicator is on it will stay on without intervention for all to see. Unless your hand signal is kept on until the manouevre is complete then anyone who missed the first use simply thinks you haven't signalled. There are many areas in cycling where I feel real electronic indicators would benefit us and those around.

Indication to others around makes me think of an earthing fault on a work colleagues car.... this mean't when the indicators were switched on the car horn would sound with the flash.... it was excellent as we hear him turning into each junction from about 1/4 mile away. It was like a clown car . Rather embarrasing for him.

Re: my altercation

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 July 2015 - 12:21pm
thats what my wife said, and I have to say, I agree with her. Given what had just happened I wasn't really thinking rationally though... I couldn't believe his actions, I wanted to know what he thought he was doing.

Re: my altercation

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 July 2015 - 12:09pm
honesty wrote:I go up to the window and ask what he was playing at.

Why risk getting stabbed for a jerk like him? Where has it gotten you?

Re: Is This The First Road Rage Death?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 July 2015 - 12:08pm
Lance Dopestrong wrote:It's not the first in the UK by a country mile.
This.

Re: Is This The First Road Rage Death?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 July 2015 - 12:07pm
It's not the first in the UK by a country mile.

Re: Indicators, the lost art?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 July 2015 - 12:06pm
Understand - I will be indicating in a car before manoeuvring, which includes braking IMHO.

I try to adopt a similar approach on a bike - trying to do too many things at once is a recipe for disaster.

Re: Is This The First Road Rage Death?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 July 2015 - 11:52am
No, it isn't the first, not even in this country - and there are many cases in other countries. Though I do wonder if you specifically mean murder rather than death.

This guy is in prison for a road rage murder. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenneth_Noye

Here's another person sent to prison for a road rage murder. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-28552876

Here is a case where someone got sent to prison for causing death by dangerous driving to some innocent third parties while having a road-rage argument with another driver. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-g ... t-31139534

Because road rage is not a defined circumstance, there aren't statistics available on it.

Re: What's your top weight saving tip for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 July 2015 - 11:27am
Whilst agreeing with most of Pjclinch's tips, for me padded pants are a must on long trips. And I find beards itchy. And unnecessary. A razor weighs next to nothing, and apart from the soap you have access to already, nothing else is needed.

Re: Bike packing versus conventional touring.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 July 2015 - 11:07am
that and CSC camera and stuff in the barbag, plus the bagman rack weighs half a kilo etc. Im guessing though that even an ali domane is probably about 9kg so theres about 2.5kg sitting right there. I actually did some photos of the packing if you are interested here http://www.onesti.co.uk/?p=46 Having looked at that it was 5kg in the saddle and a further 2.5kg in the bar. So in total about 20kg for the whole lot including water. or 45lbs.

Yes, the saddle bag is a Nelson. Seemed about perfect size for 4 days B&B touring.

Re: What do you cycle in?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 July 2015 - 11:03am
Audax67 wrote:Shorts: Assos Fi.Mille S5 or T.équipe_S7. Would like the T.cento_S7 but don't want to take out another mortgage. Any other shorts I've tried have had grievous effects. The S7 series "lycra" seems to have a lot less give than the older series, so I hope they'll last better.

In winter I wear summer shorts under Gore-Tex tights.

Otherwise, whatever wicking fabric I can get, usually my club jerseys, one, two or three at a time depending on temperature, with arm warmers as necessary. Soft Shell jacket for low temperatures, but not if I can get away with a thick long-sleeved wicking jacket. "Breathable" is a damned lie.

Yes, "breathable" means nothing once you have begun to sweat. In warmer climates breathable waterproofs do not get rid of moisture at all.

Re: Bike packing versus conventional touring.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 July 2015 - 10:57am
honesty wrote:Heres my Thorn audax. bike is approximately 11.5kg + 5kg of equipment (bags etc.) + 1.5l of water = about 18kg or approx 40lbs

WP_20150210_08_25_28_Pro.jpg


What size saddlebag is that? Nelson? The whole set-up looks very neat.

Re: Indicators, the lost art?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 July 2015 - 10:52am
I think we'd all probably agree that using indicators is a remote communication method of our intentions to change direction etc. I think one cloudy area is in places where the road lanes are marked say with a left arrow and a separate straight ahead arrow, at traffic lights or roundabouts. Unfortunately people seem to think that because they've adopted the correct lane then they don't need to indicate.... yet from the observing traffic say entering the roundabout they can't see those lane markings, so indication clearly tells them the cars intention. I encounter this often in the car ond on my bike, with the loss of momentum on the bike annoying. Also it helps if accidentally in the wrong lane as can happen on a new untravelled road.... notice of such lane division is often not given in advance and in congested traffic the markings are hidden under the cars ahead. So basically use indcators even if you are in the correctly marked lane as a help other road users.

With regards to police I've seen some appalling non-use of indicators and multiple lane changes on the newcastle-gateshead A1. These were traffic officers and I've seen many instances of flying in off the slip road and straight across all lanes to the "fast lane".... no blues and twos involved here and no indicators. Also the same in reverse with no indication... yet I've seen motorists on "Traffic Cops" on the Beeb get pulled over for such behaviour. I worked with a retired traffic policeman( retired due to car shunt ) and he said there's no reason to use indicators on a roundabout because you have priority and other vehicles must give way..... well I disagree as it makes the flow of traffic safer for everyone when indicators are used and reduces wasted stop-start events. He also said he'd taken his impreza to 150mph and if he'd been stopped he'd know the officer on that route and it'd be fine as he knows he has police driving qualifications and can handle the vehicle? Probably not unrealstic as I also know someone whose policeman husband got them off a drunk driving stop by a word with their friends at the lodge.... so dodgy things go on at those levels.

Regarding indicators in cars, myself and others were very caught out when vauxhall introduced some silly touch style indicators on the vectra and astra's of the early 2000's onward( we'd get them as hire cars ). If you used them as a standard indicator they wouldn't self cancel, easy to do and you'd end off like an octopus flicking them off, on , off on roundabouts in error much to other road users discontent. Once used to the silly design they were ok but if something isn't broken then don't fix it. I don't think Ford went down that route following recent drives in their up to date cars.

Re: my altercation

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 July 2015 - 10:34am
honesty wrote:the problem with Taunton is that there seems to be far to much traffic for such a small town. I'm hoping the NIDR when it's finished will alleviate some of the traffic through the centre of town, but they need to do something to the motorway junction onto the A 358 to allow the traffic to flow out of town better.
There's no hope that it'll alleviate some of the traffic through the centre if they don't redesign the roads and put some restrictions in. We've reproven time and time again that more roads encourages more motor traffic, at least back to the Taunton bypass (M5) opening. Now Somerset County Council are determined to repeat the mistake with the NIDR and (last I knew) enlarging Tangier Way.

The motorway junction outbound is probably blocked for the same reason that North Somerset Council aren't allowed to increase the outflow onto the M5 at J21: the Highways Agency told them no. The reason seems obvious: it would worsen the peak overloading of the Avonmouth Bridge and the Exeter terminus. SCC and NSC both have transport strategies which IMO they aren't following in practice.

Re: Bike packing versus conventional touring.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 July 2015 - 10:18am
I would agree, you've a larger saddlebag but probably not many more clothes in there assuming you are carrying tubes and tools in it. I've got my tubes etc in the 2nd bottle cage.
A bit more weight in your saddle too maybe.

Re: Bike packing versus conventional touring.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 July 2015 - 10:12am
I have now hit the tender age of 50 and carry a fair amount of excess weight I'm struggling to enjoy cycling. Hills kill me and anything over 20 miles loaded is a real challenge.

How often do your ride your bike? How far do you go when you ride?

As someone who has been hauling children, plus all the things necessary for trips with children, for the last 9 years or so, I can assure you that a little extra weight doesn't make as much difference as fitness. If you want to go up hills more easily, go up hills a lot, and they will soon become easier.

Even though I was fairly fit, when I moved from a relatively flat place to a relatively hilly one, I had some work to do to get better at climbing.

The hardest hill I ever climbed was the first hill I pedalled up after 2 months off the bike with a broken rib.

To get touring fit.... I can do it on tour, but I need to start with low mileage and work my way up to it. And that's true, however much I am carrying. The difference between credit card touring and fully loaded is probably only about 10 miles per day, if I'm not fit for it.

If I can prepare, I need to ride 4 or 5 days pers week, at least 20 miles each time, and every 3rd ride or so, go longer and longer, and work my way up to my expected daily touring mileage.

Can you commute by bicycle? Or drive / train part way and cycle the rest? Do errands or shopping by bicycle?

Good luck with it. I hope you find your enjoyment in cycling again.

p.s. if you want a new bike, or think that will help, by all means get one. Go out and ride some bikes and see what takes your fancy. But if you think it will get you up the hills more easily, you may be paying for disappointment.

Re: "How many times must a rider fall off...?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 July 2015 - 9:56am
oneten wrote:Thank you- there are some very helpful comments which are food for thought - especially Phil's about assessing a situation before rather than after the event - prevention definitely being better than cure!

As for reohn2's checklist:

How old are you? 58
How long have you been cycling? about 8 years
When did you last have your eyes tested? 3 weeks ago - close vision need reading glasses but long vision good
Is your coordination OK when not cycling? Not always - had minor stroke 3 yrs ago which has affected ear. Am awaiting a neuro test.
Do you drive,if so how often do you crash your car? Don't normally drive but before I sold car, never had a crash.

I must admit, my wife's main worry is in connection with after effects of stroke despite my protestations to the contrary. To be honest, I think I just need to take more care as it does seem that the number of falls is above average and a more serious one could come if not. As for the most recent, it was on a flat road but awful rain and lots of surface water. I was doing about 15 mph and just couldn't believe it when I fell off again - I felt indignant that it 'wasn't my fault' but there is always a cause and it was only looking bacjk that I saw the ridged ' tramline' effect of the tarmac. If I'd've slid towards the middle of the road rather than the side it could've been a different outcome and I probably wouldn't be writing this post now.
The bike and tyres/tyre pressures could also have something to do with it too.

Re: Bike packing versus conventional touring.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 July 2015 - 9:52am
Heres my Thorn audax. bike is approximately 11.5kg + 5kg of equipment (bags etc.) + 1.5l of water = about 18kg or approx 40lbs

WP_20150210_08_25_28_Pro.jpg

Im guessing the difference between this and the domane shown previously is I'm carrying a kilo or so more luggage and there's probably about 1 or 2kg more weight in the bike.

Re: Longitude to date

CTC Forum - MTB - 17 July 2015 - 9:48am
Thanks but both those threads are 'first impressions' was hoping for an update now a few months have passed.
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