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Would this bike be a suitable entry level tourer

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 8:42pm
Can anyone tell me if a city bike is suitable for use as a tourer? I am looking for a budget entry level bike and saw the B'twin Hoprider 520 City Hybrid for £320. Are city bikes heavier than tourers?
http://www.decathlon.co.uk/hoprider-520 ... 07666.html

Re: Best Farcility of the Year?? £210,000 Wasted??

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 March 2015 - 8:40pm
Pyranha wrote:Isn't that pretty poor - bikes are expected to give way at each exit in case a driver wants to use 'their' road? Obviously that's one way to avoid left hooks - make them the cyclists' fault. At the same time make the gyratory inconvenient so that cyclists avoid it if possible - so many problems solved in one go. I think I would be tempted to keep out of the bike lane and expect to be treated like traffic, rather than an encumbrance.
The current cyclepath is around the outer perimeter of the roundabout.

At each exit, to proceed around, the surface-coloured cyclepath is ended with a Give Way broken line. When clear of exiting motor traffic the cyclist may proceed to the next section.

I never use that cyclepath - just stay in the normal carriageway and progress as normal.
Use of the cyclepath absolutely demands obedience to the road markings. To disobey them would be foolhardy - bringing the cyclist into direct conflict with the motorists' reasonable assumptions of priority on exit as designated.

I'm wondering here if West Sussex County Council's intention here is to run the coloured cycle lane across the exits and give priority to cyclists crossing the exit. That would account for the sensors and flashing warning signs.

If it is not WSCC's intention to give priority at the exits to cyclists then it sounds a formalisation of the subordination of cyclists - at great additional cost.

Whichever way it is, give me Presumed Liability any day. Change the driving culture, rather than engineer around it.

Petit Depart Ride

CTC Forum - Racing - 29 March 2015 - 8:35pm
Saw this today for anyone still infected with l'esprit de Tour.

P1020454 (640x371).jpg

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 8:28pm
Nothing much other than expense and the very slightly increased chance of steerer (or extender), headtube, seatpost or ST failure I guess. That's IF you can get the bar height correct. As you have discovered, with the modern trend for short cut steerers, many people have enough problems getting their touring bike bars to the required height even with their saddles set quite low. But why go smaller if you fit the bigger size? Bigger sizes increase the chance of being able to get the bar height right and generally have a longer HT, whilst in many cases not adding much to the reach. As an example the difference between the smallest and largest 700c Surly LHTs is 8cm of seat tube but only 5cm of ETT, which corresponds to a difference in reach of less than 2cms.

The usual advice applies that slightly too small is much better than slightly too big. Don't be afraid of using a shorter or angled stem to change the reach but never buy a bike on which you cannot get the reach correct and never fall for the salesman's "you can just move your saddle forward" line. Your saddle is set relative to the pedals not the bars.

Re: Best Farcility of the Year?? £210,000 Wasted??

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 March 2015 - 8:26pm
It would be easier to make the road narrower and paint the cycle lane right down the middle.

Re: Touring frame differences

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 8:20pm
Thanks, yeah, I'm sure they'll be fine too,I'm just trying to get a better understanding of the differences between frames and where my money would be going, and how the market works. I've read tonnes of stuff comparing this bike to that over the past eighteen months but coming from a scientific background a lot of it seems pretty woolly.

Two panniers or four?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 8:14pm
I'll be cycling LEJOG solo in June/July and have been pondering the issue of how many panniers. I know that I could fit all of my gear into two smallish (and lightweight) rear panniers and a bar bag. I've done shorter tours like this in the past. But I'm wondering if the bike (a Dawes Galaxy) will actually ride better with the same luggage split between four panniers. I do have front racks and panniers as I've used these in the past - several years ago. Of course, one disadvantage of this setup is that there is then the additional weight of the front pannier racks and two small panniers.

Opininions and advice appreciated (but please don't tell me to just take a saddlebag )

Re: getting your priorities right

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 March 2015 - 8:11pm
Over time your average access cover wears smooth and becomes more and more dangerous to certain types of road user on account of lack of grip. However, if the Gypsies can make a decent living nicking them it is perhaps within the realms of cost effectiveness for Councils to replace them with newer/safer versions. I am not suggesting Councils should replace every worn one - the worn ones known to have caused an accident might be a good starting point.

Re: Best Farcility of the Year?? £210,000 Wasted??

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 March 2015 - 8:08pm
Phil Fouracre wrote:Sad and depressing, what is the point?

The point is to keep cyclists out of the way of real traffic,after all they're only bikes

Re: Best Farcility of the Year?? £210,000 Wasted??

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 March 2015 - 7:52pm
Sad and depressing, what is the point?

Re: Bordeaux to Narbonne

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 7:48pm
BigH wrote: After the col at 634m south of St Pons there was a 30 km downhill via Aigues-Vives which was a highlight of the trip.

Good Grief! We did this road in the opposite direction - if I'd realised that it was a 30km climb - I'd never have made it
Actually the ascent was quite manageable, and we enjoyed watching the vegetation change from something featuring very large cacti near Sallelles to something more familiar as we climbed.
The next morning though, St Pons to Lacaune - 6km push for the tandem as soon as we reached open countryside....

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 7:47pm
I didn't see myself as having exceptionally long legs either until I got measured at Thorn.

"Nothing worse than trying to get handlebars to a decent height with a cut short steerer and a load of seatpost showing." - other than aesthetics, what exactly is the reason why this is bad?

***************SPOILER******************

CTC Forum - Racing - 29 March 2015 - 6:16pm
E3 was one of the best races I've seen for a while!
He didn't quite manage it today in Ghent Wevelgem but he's looking great ATM with the bulk of the classics ahead to look forward to.
Well done Geraint!

Re: D&G circular

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 6:06pm
For anyone who likes old fashioned whodunnits, Dorothy L Sayers set her murder mystery novel Five Red Herrings in that area, using real locations as a backdrop. And a bicycle features.

Re: Best Farcility of the Year?? £210,000 Wasted??

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 March 2015 - 5:38pm
Isn't that pretty poor - bikes are expected to give way at each exit in case a driver wants to use 'their' road? Obviously that's one way to avoid left hooks - make them the cyclists' fault. At the same time make the gyratory inconvenient so that cyclists avoid it if possible - so many problems solved in one go. I think I would be tempted to keep out of the bike lane and expect to be treated like traffic, rather than an encumbrance.

I also like that it says that the road will not need to be closed for the works, but the bike lane will, and that cyclists should find alternative routes during the work - perhaps, hoping they'll not return?

Re: D&G circular

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 5:28pm
Thanks all, for your assistance and suggestions. I like the "find photo" feature on cycle.travel. I've never played with that before, and have just now spent a good while doing just that.
It works well too. Some of the tracks look pretty ok, some to the north of the A712 look too rough. The photos of some of the minor roads look like delightful cycling country.
I like some of the place names. Minigaff just asks to be visited.
I had a look at the 7stanes website too. Some useful info there. Some of the "big country" loop will be in the plan: at least the bit parallel to the a714 up to Glentrool.
Thank you again, I'll play and plan (and dream) some more. May bank hol weekend methinks.

Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 5:24pm
I recently learnt that I have exceptionally long legs (88cm bare-foot standover) for my height (180cm). Somehow I hadn't been aware of this before, always worn regular length trousers without issues.. I've been looking for a new bike and had a few measurements taken. Also have slightly longer than average arms.

I would like to get a position with the bars level with my saddle. This is partly due a neck pain issue probably due to years of bad posture habits, that I think my body is telling me a more upright position would relieve. I've not been able to achieve this on any of my bikes so far with proper saddle height, now I know why. People talk about bike fits but I am skeptical as they seem mainly for roadies and besides I'd like to do my own analysis first.

So I've compared the geometries for a number of touring bikes, and determined the maximum possible handlebar height I could have if I left the steerer uncut, without using stem raisers, angled stems etc, which I'd rather avoid. The results surprised me. It seems not many bikes are suitable for me. For some of them, even though they are sold with longer steerers (usually the steerer length doesn't change across sizes), it appears its inadvisable in my size to use the full extent of the steerer (guess it's not stiff enough) e.g. Kona Sutra. For many, the combination of head tube, stack and steerer dimensions doesn't allow the bars to go as high as I would want e.g. a Ridgeback expedition 57 would leave my bars a whole 8cm below where I need them at the max extent! (I used 300mm for the uncut steerer tube length for this bike though it could be wrong - these numbers can be hard to source). Bikes that would work are those with a high stack to reach ratio which usually means a long head tube. So, Thorn Sherpa and Surly LHT seem ok, but only just i.e. technically the bar would be 2cm below the saddle according to my numbers but with the right stem/bars that should be fine.

My formula is this. I need my seat to be 780mm vertically above the BB. Max bar height above BB = Stack + (Uncut steerer length - Head Tube Length) * SINE (head tube angle). I know I'm making a couple of assumptions and it might be out by a cm or two but it gives a meaningful comparison between bikes.

Another problem is that shops love to cut the steerers (to make them look pretty?) and even for bikes that would suit me, it's hard to find a test ride with the bars set up level, so I have to guess how it would feel if it were set up for me..

Anyone else have this issue?

Re: Best Farcility of the Year?? £210,000 Wasted??

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 March 2015 - 5:17pm
No road closures are necessary and minimal impact is expected for motorists.

The cycle lane will be closed for the next two weeks and cyclists are encouraged to look at other routes.

Re: Touring frame differences

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 4:54pm
200g is certainly not a big deal. And neither is the difference between 4130 and Thorn's version. Either of your front runners would serve you well for rough tracks. No bike can do everything, and if you want a fast, exciting ride you will sacrifice robustness, and I don't think you want to do that.
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