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Re: Bikes on Luton Airport Shuttle

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 May 2015 - 9:09am
I'm afraid I've only been to Luton with bike arriving under my own power, as it is close enough to ride. But since no one has answered, I did have a look at the rules/policies, and according to those it is unclear. They have some general rules about being safe on the bus and not inconveniencing others. Although you'd have a good argument that you have plane-prepared luggage, but having been on those buses, it really wouldn't be very easy, unless the bus were rather empty of other people. So they might invoke the inconvenience aspect to say no. Maybe there is some way you can ask them.

It would be safest and surely wouldn't be a huge inconvenience to bag the bike at the terminal, it is not as though you are boxing it.

Re: A Sad Day for Google Maps

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 May 2015 - 9:09am
maxglide wrote:It looks like Google have finally put to death Classic Maps. This makes a great deal of sense: Develop a terrific product, then - ignoring almost unanimous negative user feedback - utterly wreck it. Well done Google, this is a 'classic'.

Good luck with the petitions. Google's track record is all about "no U-turns".

Happily I have found an alternative which is faster than Google Classic Maps was, and much faster than New Google Maps is. It has a fixed left route planning menu like Google maps used to have.

It is http://www.openrouteservice.org/

The main difference with Google maps is that you have to enter way points in the left hand menu manually and place them in the right order, rather than simply clicking on the route to add a way point with Google maps. Once you have added the way point in the left menu you can drag it round the map as you please. I have got used to this very quickly. It might sound a bit time consuming but the time I spend looking at the map to find the name of a way point and adding it to the menu, is easily compensated by the fact that the map itself is much faster. Zooming in and out works quickly even on low spec hardware.

The plan a cycle route option seems quite good, at least for the routes I have tried planning here in Norway. It is great to be rid of Google maps.

Note openrouteservice is a mapping service and does not seem to offer satellite images nor Street View like functionality. If you are planning a cycle tour in Norway and want to look at satellite images I can recommend http://kart.finn.no

Re: Old Trafford to Wembley Stadium

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 May 2015 - 9:00am
I suggest you use this site to plan your route http://cycle.travel/

A Sad Day for Google Maps

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 May 2015 - 8:53am
It looks like Google have finally put to death Classic Maps. This makes a great deal of sense: Develop a terrific product, then - ignoring almost unanimous negative user feedback - utterly wreck it. Well done Google, this is a 'classic'.

If you give a hoot, there's a petition:
https://www.change.org/p/larry-page-ceo ... oogle-maps

More about it here, too:
http://techforluddites.com/google-is-ge ... -for-good/

Re: Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

CTC Forum - MTB - 8 May 2015 - 8:49am
Burly blokes on the pavement - why?

This seems to work both ways.
I apparently startled a 'lady' pedestrian yesterday after cycling towards her for some distance wearing hiviz.
She seemed oblivious to the fact the she was walking on a cycle path and took umbridge that I was there
almost stationary so tried to shove me off as she walked past.
There would have been plenty of room if she and her partner had walked in file but abreast just no room and giving way to
an almost stationary bike seemed too much.
She wasn't even very burly.

Hey ho.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 8:42am
TonyR wrote:buryman wrote:The statistics would look rather different if quoted as per passenger hour rather than km.

We're talking about a fixed journey here, from home to school so per km is appropriate unless you think the OP takes a long circuitous route to school on the bike so the journey takes the same time as it would to walk there directly.
I think this is one of the major problems with such comparative safety statistics - it is difficult to get meaningful comparison measures. I think you can make a good case for per person hours and a good case for per km as well as probably many other measures. And the underlying problem is that the two groups are in pretty different situations facing different (different to a debatable degree) risks - although from a common source (i.e. motor vehicles the primary cause, but pedestrians on pavements or crossing the road face different risks than cyclists moving along a road).

Bit like comparing apples and bananas.

Ian

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 7:29am
TonyR wrote:The fat commuter wrote:TonyR wrote:Safety? Statistically they are at much greater risk from motor traffic on the pavement than on a bike on the road and that's before injuries and deaths from trips and falls are considered.
Can we see these stats please.

I know of a few cyclists who have been injured, some severely, after connecting with another road user. I haven't heard of any pedestrians that have been injured, even slightly, having been knocked over on the pavement. I think that the number of pedestrians using the pavement is far higher than cyclists (certainly around here it is) too.

RRCGB2013. Fatalities per bn journey person km 2003-12. Cyclists 27. Pedestrians 31.
Sorry to be picky here but you stated 'on the pavement'. The above stats are pedestrians in general - which can be people crossing the road.

Now, if I look at it that way then I hear of more people being killed and injured in Sheffield as pedestrians than as cyclists. In the last five years I can think of four pedestrian deaths and many pedestrian injuries within two miles of my house. However, from the reports of these deaths they could have been avoided by the pedestrians acting differently.

A child walking to school under supervision or with proper training is unlikely to be injured. What the problem around here is that many pedestrians will simply walk into the path of the traffic - we have a high student population and they seem to have a death wish.

Thinking back though, there was a really sad incident close to our house where a car did mount the pavement and severely injure two young girls about ten years back.

If you use the required amount of care and attention as a pedestrian then the likelihood of you being injured is low. If you take the required amount of care and attention as a cyclist then the likelihood of you being injured is also low. However, the perception that I get is that as a cyclist, because you actually share the road with other vehicles, you are more at mercy to the actions of other drivers than as a pedestrian.

Hope that makes sense.

For what it's worth, I think the OP has made the right decision. I made a similar decision for myself a while back. I can either cycle two and a half miles to work or the long way which is almost eight miles. The eight mile route I feel far safer than on the short route. I am more likely to get pedestrians walking into my path, drivers cutting across me, close passes and aggressive drivers on the short route than the long one. I initially did the long route for the extra time in the saddle - now I do it because it's far more pleasurable.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 7:13am
buryman wrote:The statistics would look rather different if quoted as per passenger hour rather than km.

We're talking about a fixed journey here, from home to school so per km is appropriate unless you think the OP takes a long circuitous route to school on the bike so the journey takes the same time as it would to walk there directly.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 7:00am
buryman wrote:The statistics would look rather different if quoted as per passenger hour rather than km.
Yes, but most people travel a distance, not a time.

For transport then distance is the appropriate measure. For a leisure activity it is time...

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 May 2015 - 6:16am
The statistics would look rather different if quoted as per passenger hour rather than km.

Re: Cycle Touring Festival - May 2015 - Lancashire

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 7 May 2015 - 11:45pm
Just wondering how the festival went? Didn't get a ticket myself but was tempted to, be interesting to hear people's views on it.....

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 May 2015 - 11:36pm
The fat commuter wrote:TonyR wrote:Safety? Statistically they are at much greater risk from motor traffic on the pavement than on a bike on the road and that's before injuries and deaths from trips and falls are considered.
Can we see these stats please.

I know of a few cyclists who have been injured, some severely, after connecting with another road user. I haven't heard of any pedestrians that have been injured, even slightly, having been knocked over on the pavement. I think that the number of pedestrians using the pavement is far higher than cyclists (certainly around here it is) too.

RRCGB2013. Fatalities per bn journey person km 2003-12. Cyclists 27. Pedestrians 31.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 May 2015 - 11:17pm
TonyR wrote:Safety? Statistically they are at much greater risk from motor traffic on the pavement than on a bike on the road and that's before injuries and deaths from trips and falls are considered.
Can we see these stats please.

I know of a few cyclists who have been injured, some severely, after connecting with another road user. I haven't heard of any pedestrians that have been injured, even slightly, having been knocked over on the pavement. I think that the number of pedestrians using the pavement is far higher than cyclists (certainly around here it is) too.

Re: Any point in reporting a v v close pass?

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 May 2015 - 10:39pm
Most of us, I presume, suffer from very close passes at times. I'm quite an agressive rider and will try to maintain my space in traffic. If I'm in a situation where I think a close pass is likely, I've got into the habit of stretching my arm out from my body with a closed fist. Not indicating but making myself a bit wider. It does work for me. A good old squiggle works as well, as if I'm a bad rider [probably true]. In Portugal when I was getting very close passes from Timber trucks constantly I stopped and fastened a HI-Viz vest to the outside of my saddlebad so that once on the move it was billowing away in the breeze. Suprisingly effective.
I'm getting a bit bothered at the moment with these new [Prius?] electric cars that creep up on you. they are so silent. Im sure they are a danger to pedestrians, as so many peds step out in front of me on the bike, because they rely on their ears.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 May 2015 - 9:06pm
I feel quite sad to read this, but I completely understand. I hope that someday your children can feel reasonably safe cycling anywhere they want to go.

Re: University Project (Charging Rucksack Concept)

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 May 2015 - 8:01pm
The dynamo-rucksack idea isn't really a goer I fear. You would need a wire running from the bike to the rucksack which is going to be inconvenient if not downright dangerous. In any case the main problems with using a dynamo as a charging solution are cost, drag, low output, and need to use an intermediary battery. The latter makes the rucksack idea redundant. Solving these problems is probably beyond the scope of a university project.

I'd be interested to see if a wind-powered battery charger would be any use on a bike. It would obviously be low output but the advantage over a dynamo is that the drag would decrease to negligible levels when climbing. The problem is obviously that you would need very small rotors but it might be possible to use several on the down tube. I don't know, just an idea.

Panniers that convert into a rucksack would be great for cycle touring. And a lightweight, folding pedal spanner would be very handy.

Re: Ideas for first tour - taking a toddler with us.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 7 May 2015 - 6:59pm
Might I suggest a coastal tour of Norfolk, Suffolk & Essex. Train from Morecambe to Peterborough I think should just involve one change at Leeds. The North Norfolk coast is easy to access from P'boro. Beaches a'plenty for all the family along the coast. Lots of campsites too. Either cycle back across Norfolk, Suffolk or Essex to P'boro when you've had enough or get a train from, say Ipswich, back to P'boro to travel back north.

Mountain bikers take aid to Nepal victims

CTC Forum - MTB - 7 May 2015 - 6:30pm
Although technically cargo bikes it's certainly off road.
We can go places land rovers fear.

Re: Cycling to school for years, but children no longer happ

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 May 2015 - 4:58pm
buryman wrote:A difficult decision but I'm sure it is the right one. The safety and happiness of your children are far more important than the desire to ride on the roads as you describe them.

Safety? Statistically they are at much greater risk from motor traffic on the pavement than on a bike on the road and that's before injuries and deaths from trips and falls are considered.

Happiness? Try that strategy when they are teenagers and see where it gets you.

Re: Ideas for first tour - taking a toddler with us.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 7 May 2015 - 4:51pm
There is a largely segregated cycle route along (at least an extended part of) the N coast of Wales with a high density of entertainments along the way. Also gives access to Angelsey via the old Menai bridge, though getting out of the town of Menai Bridge is less than ideal. Quite a lot of fun things on A too. Along the N wales route, there are some sharp little hills in various spots, and also some gates/barriers that proved tricky with a tandem let alone trailer. On Anglesey, although there are not high hills, but there are plenty of steep little to medium ones. Maybe Anglesey alone would suffice as a tour. I expect you can get there with one change, though I haven't checked.
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