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Re: Does anyone like........ chipseal?

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 May 2015 - 12:32pm
It's the stuff of my nightmares! Especially when it's warm and the tar and little chips stick to your tyres and under your frame. It is most certainly slower to ride on and slippery too when fresh and when going downhill, not to mention getting loose stones flung at your from passing cars! Last year the council here went through a similar blitz of chipsealing a whole bunch of minor roads before the winter. It's a cost thing I'm sure...

Re: National Parks in the Netherlands

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 23 May 2015 - 12:14pm
not an expert on birds, but a possible route could be:
Oostvaardersplassen
continue north for Giethoorn
If you need to see a couple of hundred storks turn west for de Schiphorst
Keep going for Fochteloerveen
Continue north for the Lauwersmeer
Head back south along the German border
cut across de hoge Veluwe

Does anyone like........ chipseal?

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 May 2015 - 12:04pm
Hi
Over the past couple of days when out doing local bike loops I've encoutered two extensive chipsealing events. It appears the Northumberland county council are on a chipsealing blitzkrieg. When I reached one road the contractors were fine for me to cycle through past the dozen or so trucks and tar wagons, I walked some of the road due to the amount of chips and the downhill gradient. In total about 1-2miles of road have been chipsealed but then yesterday taking a route to avoid this area I encountered another 1 mile stretch of newly laid chipseal..... on sections of road that were smooth. I'm trapped .
So for the next few months this area will now be awash with loose gravel and overtaking cars pinging the chippings up, not to mention the stone chips on the bike frame. Not sure if it's my false perception but on the chipsealed roads I ride it feels as if you ride slower, when you return to smooth asphalt it feels similar to getting a slight tailwind. Does anyone else feel this and do others like or dislike chipsealing of roads...... it seems to becoming prevalent in our cost cutting culture and it seems in the US its an issue too. I'd imagine if done properly it may work but I ride all too many frost spalled, chipsealed roads that are only about 3yrs old and in poor shape.

Re: route finding in France- maps or new tech

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 23 May 2015 - 9:47am
I am so not sure about the idea of pre-planning a detailed route, to follow on a screen. My experience is that I'd rather potter about, going wherever I please, even if that means getting into some navigational pickles, now and then. Part of the pleasure of cycle touring is the unexpected discovery and the unplanned detour - I know these are both possible regardless of whether you use a Garmin or a compass, it's just that that clever piece of plastic on the handlebars has a magnetic pull and a mesmeric tendency to get the rider to follow the line... I'm not 100% convinced yet!

Re: Roadcycling fimed whit pro drone in 4k definition

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 May 2015 - 9:15am
Spinners wrote:Impressive. Eurosport chopper pilots should be concerned...

We have said that most of the season...... this could be the future of filming the peloton... no expensive helicopters / issues with flight paths etc., no down draught to annoy the riders / affect riders..... not to mention frightening livestock'''
Just a couple of cars in the line of cars a driver and the controller.... Might help where there are trees and the peloton disappears because the helos cannot film them...

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

CTC Forum - On the road - 23 May 2015 - 9:12am
NATURAL ANKLING wrote:Low cadence low power.
High cadence more power.It depends on the engine.
RPM isn't proportional to power, it's far more complicated than that.

Re: Confusingly signed cycle routes

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 May 2015 - 10:57pm
drossall wrote:...I've said it before, but in my opinion the problem is that the people who erect them unaccountably assume that the principles of navigation are different on a bike. They aren't.

So, in a car, you get from London to Rugby by looking for signs to The North, or Birmingham, or some such place that is farther away than you want to go, until you get close enough for your destination to appear on signs. You do NOT look successively for Hornsey, Barnet, Potters Bar and so on. ...

You'll approve of this one then.
DSCN0562a.jpg
From this point Google maps gives a not entirely unreasonable route to Dover of 56 miles. Amsterdam is a mere 290 miles in the direction shown via a ferry from Dover. If you did want to ride to Amsterdam you could go in the opposite direction, just 254 miles via a ferry from Harwich.

Re: Roadcycling fimed whit pro drone in 4k definition

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 May 2015 - 10:25pm
Sense and avoid is not far off now.

Re: Confusingly signed cycle routes

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 May 2015 - 9:53pm
I stand corrected. But I've never found my way across the city on the paths, and frequently given up and gone back on the roads to avoid being dumped in some shopping centre or park I've never seen before, or heading off in the wrong direction because of lack of a sign.

Stevenage, which is more local to me, is as difficult, but on a smaller scale, and with fewer signs.

If signs get vandalised, just paint the directions on the cycle path? That's the other thing - cars have major routes. If you follow the A1, you're pretty confident of ending up in the north. But cycle routes are all created equal, with no sense of a main route to follow and everything else being a side turning. So surface the main routes in a different colour, since they don't really need to be wider like main car routes are?

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 May 2015 - 9:49pm
Hi,
Low cadence low power.
High cadence more power.

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=66742#p569959

Re: Confusingly signed cycle routes

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 May 2015 - 9:43pm
Now now... Milton Keynes redway direction signs were some of the first to have both the next place, the terminus on the far side of the city (in capitals) and a route number if appropriate. They just got vandalised often and no, no destinations beyond the city limits were signed. After all, why would you want to leave the redways? There be dragons!

Re: route finding in France- maps or new tech

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 May 2015 - 9:38pm
I use an Etrex 20 with Garmin City Navigator Europe maps. Works beautifully. For route planning I use Open Runner, but it gets a bit phunny over 1000 km.

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 May 2015 - 9:33pm
Barometrics are inaccurate, but then so are GPSes. Having both, I can find a fair approximation to total climb.

Re: Confusingly signed cycle routes

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 May 2015 - 9:30pm
To be fair, many road signs meant for drivers are only useful if you already know where you're going - either they appear too late for you to manoeuvre, or there's a vital one missing, or whatever. However, cycle-route signs are even worse.

I've said it before, but in my opinion the problem is that the people who erect them unaccountably assume that the principles of navigation are different on a bike. They aren't.

So, in a car, you get from London to Rugby by looking for signs to The North, or Birmingham, or some such place that is farther away than you want to go, until you get close enough for your destination to appear on signs. You do NOT look successively for Hornsey, Barnet, Potters Bar and so on.

Unaccountably, the people who put up signs in, for example, Milton Keynes forget this entirely, and assume that no cyclist would want to go as far as Aylesbury, so they don't signpost it. As a result, you can't navigate even a short distance across the city by following that "distant" destination. Instead, you need the kind of encyclopaedic local knowledge that includes where Woughton, Middleton and Woolstone villages are - and of course anyone who knows that doesn't need the signs

Elsewhere, many town centres are hiding somewhere the bodies (and bikes) of cyclists who died before they found the way home. This is because councils often signpost only "Town centre", and not the way home again. People believe many strange things about cyclists but not, as far as I know, that they ride in only one direction.

Re: Is a cadence sensor worth it?

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 May 2015 - 9:13pm
How does the altimeter work? If it's barometric, we had one of those for walking, and to say it was wildly inaccurate would be an understatement. It sometimes had us doing a lot of ascent while we were sitting down having lunch, due to changes in air pressure because of the weather. That means it is not consistent from day to day on the same route.
Even the map-based type GPS we have now, though better, still tends to overestimate a bit, but it is at least consistent on the same route.

I use Anquet mapping on the computer at home. It also overestimates a bit, I think, but as I use it for route comparisons not anything absolute, I figure it should be consistent enough for my purposes.

Re: Roadcycling fimed whit pro drone in 4k definition

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 May 2015 - 8:16pm
hexhome wrote:A more suitable option for cycling;

https://youtu.be/4vGcH0Bk3hg


But no collision avoidance

Re: Problems I never knew needed solving

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 May 2015 - 7:45pm
Schwalbe 28mm Marathons ... Total comfort on any frame ..and no punctures. On and off road grip. Top kit.

Re: Problems I never knew needed solving

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 May 2015 - 7:42pm
Change the tyres and inner tubes. Depending on the frame size you will be able to get away with at least a 25mm tyre, perhaps even a 28mm. That will give you a more relaxed ride.

Re: Which commuter?

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 May 2015 - 7:18pm
Mainly road but might go canal towpath or unmade track ocaisionally for a change.
12 mile commute normally takes between 40 and 45 mins at present.
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