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Re: My first tour (I didn't make it)

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 August 2014 - 11:07am
vernon wrote:I'm six stones heavier than you and have never used a trailer.

I have had one or two spokes break in the past twelve years but nothing catastrophic. The spokes that failed were on the cheaper bikes. Yoiu can safely ignore the advice to use use 40 spoke rear wheels they simply aren't necessary. A thirty six spoke wheel is perfectly acceptable.

What bike do you have ?

I haven't spent a lot on a bike as didn't want to unless I really loved touring and was going to make use of a more expensive bike. So for my £200 bike I thought a trailer would be better for it than panniers.

Dave

Re: You Are A Bunch of Frauds

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 August 2014 - 10:32am
What tyres do the two bikes have?

The Galaxy with its higher bars and all its touring accoutrements will not be as aerodynamic, and that may add up to something worth talking about over a fast 20-minute ride.

Re: 3rd time unlucky

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 August 2014 - 10:26am
Also check for other causes, such as low tyre pressure or bad rim tape.

I buy REMA TIP TOP F0 patches (16 mm diameter, aimed at road bikes). I think they come in packs of 10, which is bulk enough for me, and they are cheap enough that the price doesn’t matter much. I think I got my last set from Rose Bikes in Germany, which is a useful shop for ordering a bunch of small bits and pieces you’ve been meaning to pick up, since it seems to stock everything under the sun (e.g. Shimano Nexus rear sprockets in a variety of sizes).

Re: Shock finding: cycling causes weight loss

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 August 2014 - 10:26am
Also a shock revelation is if you exercise more and eat less you lose weight,

Re: Hand signals on bike

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 August 2014 - 10:23am
I am in the signal when it benefits camp,
just as a follow on from this, they say truth is stranger than fiction, me and the missus were on another ride out and had to do a left right turn, signalled to turn right on hill and got overtaken by car who believe it or not followed us out of junction,

Notes from a flat country

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 August 2014 - 9:22am
I'd been looking forward to riding in a land without hills. It would be a change to be able to cycle without slogging up a hill pushing and panting like I was about to give birth. A long weekend touring the Netherlands seemed like the perfect gift for the person who moans about hills.
http://wp.me/p3yZa1-16C

Re: Hand signals on bike

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 August 2014 - 9:11am
When being followed down a single track road I will often indicate left or right when getting near a passing place where I intend to pull into. Idea being to let the following vehicle know I have spotted them and intend to pull over and that they don't need to push/squeeze past.

Ian

Re: Hand signals on bike

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 August 2014 - 9:11am
I indicate right and left

Re: Hand signals on bike

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 August 2014 - 7:41am
I'm another who indicates when there's a benefit otherwise doesn't.

Very rare I'll indicate left and whilst I indicate right it's pretty much universally ignored by the following drivers any way.

Re: Shock finding: cycling causes weight loss

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 August 2014 - 7:15am
People get obese because of two things.

1. Their genes, specifically their degree of insulin resistance.
If however, they eat a low carb diet, which many populations did, or a low-glycaemic index diet (no refined carbs) and worked hard, they don't get obese.

2. A "modern" high carb diet.

In an insulin resistant person (it gradually gets worse as you age), the high carb intake generates hunger as the consequently high insulin blocks the use of fat. Fat can be used when there's more fat in the fat cells (i.e. the person is heavier). Eating this diet explains why some people are "normally" 17st on a "modern" diet and drop to say 12st on a low carb (50g carb or less) diet. It's really that simple.

All this calorie counting doesn't work long-term. True low-carb works very well, but it HAS to be low.
There are papers on-line comparing low carb v low fat and they define e.g. low carb as 45% of calories or less. This is nonsense. It does not work at that level. It has to be down around 10% or less.

Re: You Are A Bunch of Frauds

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 August 2014 - 7:12am
The morning ride acted as your warm-up.
There's NO big surprise.

Re: 3rd time unlucky

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 August 2014 - 6:00am
brooksby wrote:... or else you are dangerously attracted to all those glittery bits on the road...

I always thought those shiny bits should be closely examined maybe that's where I am going wrong.

I've been using gatorskins and maybe these have done more miles than I thought but they don't look too bad. Anyhow I will be changing them as I have a spare set lying around.

Re: Vintage steel frame bicycle for touring

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 August 2014 - 4:43am
Aubergine wrote:Continuing this post since I have a similar question - I'm thinking of cycling in South America next year, likely along the salt plains in Bolivia and some fairly off-road tracks.

I have a ridgeback voyager bike, which survived me very well in Kyrgyzstan, the Himalayas, Morocco etc. I added an additional gear ring at the back so I can cope with mountain passes.
My boyfriend thinks that it may not be up to scratch for South America and that I should invest in a mountain bike. I'm slightly loathe to get a mountain bike since:
1.I don't want to buy another bike when my current one is great! and 2.I imagine it will be much tougher when we are on tarmac roads.

Any thoughts? If I should get another bike, any recommendations? Thank you!
A tourer is closest you will get to teh best of both worlds. But if the off road is really rough, a tourer may not be ideal. On the other hand, you are correct that a MTB will be much harder to ride on the road. If most of your miles are going to be on road, maybe it would be best to skip the roughest off road? Maybe you could put semi-slicks on whichever bike you decide to take?

Re: Fell off on a sort of tramline - advice please?

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 August 2014 - 3:27am
No notebook required: phone apps and mobile websites like fixmystreet.com are available.

Yes, it's tedious, but what's the alternative? Ignore it and then when a fellow rider crashes, the highway authority gets away scot free? Better to report them and nudge councils towards actually taking proper care.

Re: Panniers vs Courier Bag (Commuting)

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 August 2014 - 1:16am
You're sampling from the monoculture of touring cyclists. In defence of courier bags: they don't make your back anywhere near as sweaty as a rucksack and they hang lower on your back; taking panniers off when you park up is a right pfaff, and if you leave them on, then you risk them being stolen, or the contents taken; if you wire them on, then you can't take them off; if you walk around with a pannier in each hand, you can't do a lot else; if you cycle through woods panniers can snag, or if you cycle over bumpy grounds then they rattle around. Similarly, you won't find many people on here advocating a front basket, even though they are very practical, and you can reach in as you cycle, and you can just throw stuff in. No, a bar bag and panniers are the correct symbols of belonging.

Re: Panniers vs Courier Bag (Commuting)

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 11:53pm
brooksby wrote:I've clearly been spoilt by using a pannier - is it just me? Does using panniers instead of a backpack go with "maturing" as a cyclist?

It is nice to let the bike take the strain instead of your back.. I guess I feel like a more serious cyclist loaded up with panniers!!

Re: Fell off on a sort of tramline - advice please?

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 11:28pm
Pete Owens wrote:While, you probably won't succeed in claiming any damages for yourself (it is unreasonable to expect a highway authority to spot such a subtle defect) you could help the next cyclist.

If you report the fault to fillthathole - and explain why it is dangerous even though it doesn't look much - and what happened to you then they ought to fix it. And if they don't then they won't have an excuse to refuse to compensate the next victim.
Pete
Have you been down the Cheshire lanes recently?
You'll need a note book about about 4inch thick to report all the defects.
I kid ye not,but some of the bridleways and towpaths I ride are in a lot better condition

The road notwork in a 50 mile radius of Warrington is a complete disgrace especially the minor routes.
I now find I'm driving around potholes in my car they're so bad,let when riding my bike .And the repairs being carried out are so poor I'll give them one winter before they'll need doing again,to say it's false economy would be a gross understatement.
It reminds me of when I used to travel in the Eastern block before the wall came down.
It's hard to think we're the fifth richest country in the world.

Apologies for the rant but I couldn't help myself .

Re: My first tour (I didn't make it)

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 August 2014 - 11:21pm
theDaveB wrote:To answer some questions (can't remember who posted what) -

Am not against panniers but against all that weight on my back wheel as well as me being 17 stone. I thought a trailer would be less strain on the bike. Kept reading about people with broken spokes and replacing back wheels on tour.


I'm six stones heavier than you and have never used a trailer. Yes, the trailer reduces the weight on the rear wheel but it does increase the weight that you have to get up hills. There's no shame in getting off and pushing. One thing to bear in mind is that you ought to up your calorie intake if cycling in hilly territory - you need extra energy to move your bike, trailer and payload uphill. A calorie deficiency is a killer which turns roads into sticky 'treacle'. I tour with panniers, sometimes two of them, sometimes four.

I have had one or two spokes break in the past twelve years but nothing catastrophic. The spokes that failed were on the cheaper bikes. Yoiu can safely ignore the advice to use use 40 spoke rear wheels they simply aren't necessary. A thirty six spoke wheel is perfectly acceptable.

As for locking your bike and trailer - a thickish cable lock will immobilise your bike - the trailer is a complication making parking your bike problematic at some supermarkets.

I keep all of my valuables: phone, wallet, camera, passport, and documentation in a bar bag and take it into shops and supermarkets with me once I've locked my bike. The theft of laden touring bikes is a rarity and you can relax about the risks of theft.

Re: Fell off on a sort of tramline - advice please?

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 11:16pm
While, you probably won't succeed in claiming any damages for yourself (it is unreasonable to expect a highway authority to spot such a subtle defect) you could help the next cyclist.

If you report the fault to fillthathole - and explain why it is dangerous even though it doesn't look much - and what happened to you then they ought to fix it. And if they don't then they won't have an excuse to refuse to compensate the next victim.
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