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Re: Filthy Drivers: Roadside Rubbish

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 February 2015 - 4:53pm
New penalties: Dropping litter out of a car - Your car gets filled with all sorts of litter that has been collected and swept off the streets.
Dropping litter anywhere else - your house gets filled.

Re: Filthy Drivers: Roadside Rubbish

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 February 2015 - 4:43pm
Merry_Wanderer wrote:I don't believe in a sin scale. Knowingly dropping litter, be it a gel sachet, a punctured inner, a car tyre or a sandwich wrappers. They are all litter. I have challenged car drivers who have chucked fag ends or crisp bags out of a car window and asked whether it would be ok for me to chuck my rubbish on their front garden.

This isn't just offensive but genuinely noxious. On three occasions (twice as a motorcyclist, once as a cyclist) I have been sitting alongside a car at lights only to get a face full of ash and smoke as a driver sticks their lit cigarette out of the window and knocks the ash off it. Each time the driver had not clocked I was there (I know because I remonstrated with them) and though I hate to stereotype each was a woman. I know I have just stereotyped but....

Re: Panniers as airline baggage

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 February 2015 - 4:42pm
I use a military type duffel. I can get two full paniers, and a bit more in it.

Some people also use suitcases bought from charity shops and discarded (or re-donated) after each flight.

I think it should be possible with careful packing to pack to the maximum weight in a checked bag, and take everything else as carry-on.

Etiquette for French cycle paths

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 February 2015 - 4:22pm
I'm ok with the courteous and considerate stuff.
But is there an established practice of keeping oncoming cyclists to your left?

Its never really bothered me up to now, but most of my cycle path use to date has either been on pretty quiet routes or on towpaths, where so many people display an aversion to taking the "wet" side regardless of any convention that I've learnt to just look for early signs of a preference and then go for the other side.
This summer though, we might encounter more "traffic", without a water feature, and on a less nimble bike, so I'm doing my research!

Re: Taking a bike on a train

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 February 2015 - 4:13pm
The fat commuter wrote:... sitting on a train reading or simply looking out of the window is preferable to driving over The Snake Pass and then travelling around the M60.

The train station is about two and a half miles away on the Sheffield side, similar on the Wigan side. It would be much easier if I could just get on my bike and do the short journeys either side on bike.



So you have this vision. A beautiful, simple one. Of ease and environmental harmony. Of man respecting nature but economically and simply going along his way. Of joy without harm, without excess. A simple, beautiful notion.

And then you come back to reality. You mention it to a railway man and ask again, "How possible is it?". Suddenly you are surrounded by barking, shouting men and women in uniform threatening you, calling Security, berating and embarassing you in front of all the other passengers, or waving tickets and booking conditions in your face, telling you it's impossible, telling you to leave your children with their bikes at home, laughing at your tandem. Two bikes only they scream, two bikes only. And so you turn, grim faced back home, angry and astounded, disbelieving.

So next time you know better. You make yourself inconspicuous. You push, negotiate, argue. You are quick, quicker than they are. You are like a refugee on the last train out of a war zone but you make it. And you look at their false-smiling glib publicity photos of happy passengers in their smart clothes and you know you have joined an underworld of intelligent, different but unheard people.

Sorry, your question was...?

Re: Panniers as airline baggage

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 February 2015 - 3:17pm
I have long used a lightweight nylon kitbag for packing my panniers where 1-piece is required. It also protects the pannier's important fixing systems, which can get caught in airport baggage belts. The luggage has to be emptied from the panniers, I can't just chuck them in packed.

The advantage of a kitbag over the more general bags is that the kitbag can be bungied easily onto your backrack as a place to put wet/dirty clothes and tents, and generally for luggage expansion capacity for those occasions when you need to pack a week's food etc onto your bike.

Re: Taking a bike on a train

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 February 2015 - 3:15pm
I once got on the train and found that I couldn't put the bike down because the space was full of luggage, and I couldn't move the luggage because I was standing in the aisle holding the bike while a queue of passengers stood behind tutting.

Sometimes the door/lobby is too small to get the bike through without taking the panniers off. Watch out the train doesn't disappear off up the line with your bags while you're unloading the bike and then fighting your way back onto the train against a tide of disembarking passengers who all think you're an impatient git who won't wait to embark.

Sometimes they will tell you that if you want to book you need to do it 24 hours in advance.

Re: Taking a bike on a train

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 February 2015 - 3:00pm
Transpennine are quite flexible on bikes. In theory I think they ask for reservations, but in practice I've never yet been asked to show that I've got one. The downside of that is that you can't always guarantee that there'll be (physical) space for your bike on the train: those routes can get very crowded, so the advice above to try to travel off-peak is definitely worth following. (You could go with Northern from Manchester to Wigan too. They're generally very cycle-friendly: no reservations needed, and -- unless you happen to run into a grumpy guard -- a generally common-sense attitude to letting as many bikes onto a train as will comfortably fit. Their rolling stock consists of a random selection of the rest of the country's cast-offs, though, so it's very hard to predict what sort of bicycle storage area there'll be, or where it'll be located.)

Re: MTB C2C Ravenglass - Ravenscar

CTC Forum - MTB - 13 February 2015 - 2:34pm
I've not hired a van for a good few years, but I think I paid about £150 for a long weekend for a great big Peugeot hdi, think tranny Van but a bit bigger, seats 3in the front.

Might be worth looking into. Remember to factor in the diesel cost.

Edit, didn't read the OP was going coast to coast!

Re: Panniers as airline baggage

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 February 2015 - 2:30pm
Heavy duty polythene sheet from bed shop. It is used to wrap mattresses. Use packing tape to make one big bundle.

However I don't fully understand the post. Do you really have an extra 40 KGS and only as one piece?? Most airports have a 32 kg max weight for any piece. I'd check if I were you.

Re: Cycling into the sun

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 February 2015 - 2:15pm
Flinders wrote: In a cycle shop £70+. In a safety clothing shop . . £8.

Are you sure they're the same specification? If so that's pretty outrageous.

They probably are the real thing. A couple of years ago one of my friends worked for Oakley and she got me a pair of Ducati sunglasses for "cost and the price of a beer." I gave her £20. At that time,in the shops, they were £119.95. There really is that much of a mark-up on such things.

Re: Good Pannier or Rear Rack for Dawes Discovery?

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 February 2015 - 2:07pm
Vantage wrote:These panniers seem to get very good reviews although I've not tried them myself.
http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/sjsc-rear-pa ... prod11550/They're not bad, but they're not great either. They're a good size for the weekly shop and light. They're also cheap, but to rectify the shortcomings needs some money spent on them.

Basically the rack attachment is pants. It's the old fashioned simple hook type. The hooks are too close together and the backing plate is thin flexible plastic. To get these panniers working well I needed to buy some correx board and some rivets. The board is cut to overlay the existing board. The hooks are removed and re-rivetted through the correx at much wider spacing to give more rigid support.

I then dispensed with the old bungee strap at the base of the bags. I then moved the D ring to the bottom of the bag. A large quick release zip tie then attaches the D ring to the base of the rack. Release the zip ties to remove the bags, otherwise the bags are good for keeping on the bike permanently - little chance of the average scumbag figuring out how to remove them.

The whole thing results in an extremely rigid setup.

Because they are light, they're not the most durable bags. To reduce wear I placed sections of thin karrimor sleeping mat at the bottom of the bags. This really helps when sharp edged objects are placed within.

EDIT: there's pictures of my modification towars the end of this thread viewtopic.php?f=5&t=79714&hilit=sjs+pannier+bags&start=15

Re: Filthy Drivers: Roadside Rubbish

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 February 2015 - 1:42pm
I don't believe in a sin scale. Knowingly dropping litter, be it a gel sachet, a punctured inner, a car tyre or a sandwich wrappers. They are all litter. I have challenged car drivers who have chucked fag ends or crisp bags out of a car window and asked whether it would be ok for me to chuck my rubbish on their front garden.

Re: Panniers as airline baggage

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 February 2015 - 1:35pm
i've use a zipped version of the Ikea bag - popular with travellers hailing from Eastern Europe and available for just a couple of quid. Folds down to sit in the bottom of a bag while on your trip so ready for the return. Being zipped means you can lock it and include stuff like shoes loose.

Re: Taking a bike on a train

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 February 2015 - 1:03pm
Generally, if you travel off-peak it's OK, but you can get busy trains all the time going to certian destinations like airports. Then you sometimes find the bike space is full of suitcases. Also, avoid Friday afternoons, when students are travelling home for the weekend with large cases, rucksacks, etc.

Re: MTB C2C Ravenglass - Ravenscar

CTC Forum - MTB - 13 February 2015 - 12:47pm
Friend or man in a van hire?

Re: Taking a bike on a train

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 February 2015 - 12:09pm
Only last year I had my first experience of bikes on trains. I'm based in scotland so can't comment on your exact train company. But what I can say is... I had to get two trains and gee they were a totally different experience. The first train... Fabulous... A designated bike bit so I could secure my bike and sit close by. Easy. The second train was a total nightmare and in hindsight Id have rather just cycled the 20odd miles. No designated bike bit. Had to stand wi bike in the doors section. Buggies. Prams. Ignorant people. Panicking people. Constantly having to move the bike to accommodate all of the above. Not a pleasant experience at all.

Re: Taking a bike on a train

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 February 2015 - 11:06am
http://www.atob.org.uk/bike-rail/uk-bik ... vel-guide/ for general principles; http://www.atob.org.uk/bike-rail/uk-bik ... trictions/ for specific companies. Try http://www.traintimes.org.uk/live/ or wikipedia to see who serves a station.

Re: Panniers as airline baggage

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 February 2015 - 11:02am
I put them in a cardboard box.
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