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Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 11:23am
pwa wrote:Worry ye not! Driverless vehicles stop when they sense that there is insufficient room to pass safely. They take no chances. On a busy route I would expect one to spend most of its time motionless.
7mph is a bit optimistic then

Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 11:22am
Worry ye not! Driverless vehicles stop when they sense that there is insufficient room to pass safely. They take no chances. On a busy route I would expect one to spend most of its time motionless.

Re: Sunday Times: drivers should pass close

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 11:17am
Maybe I have missed something or there is something on another thread but I read an article in "The Times" recently describing proposed trials for driverless vehicles.
One of these schemes was for a "Pod" with a speed of 7mph to be trialled in Milton Keynes. It was envisaged that the "Pod" would use the cycle paths
I know Milton Keynes was built with an extensive cycle network but I wonder if the paths are wide enough to allow these vehicles to pass each other - or cyclists using the path.
How would priority be established?

Re: Is touring becoming a thing of the past?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 11:16am
For a proper camping gear carrying tourer you do certainly have to deal with one of the small number of niche shops, probably on-line unless you are lucky enough to live close to one. Audax / winter trainer / light tourer bikes are excellent for day tours but not, of course, full=on cycle camping. The modern versions of traditional tourers are great all-round bikes, more so than hybrids, so it is a pity that you don't see them used more for commuting and so forth. But there are more trendy bikes (Genesis Croix de Fer) that pretend to be "cyclo-cross" but are in fact very close to traditional tourer.

I don't really remember a time when lots of people did long cycle tours (except for LEJOG). I did before we had the kids, and will again in a couple of years when they have moved on. I think the golden age was before my time. But it is an activity that could take off in the future. It really needs a marketing boost, a change of image.

Re: Tipper crash in Bath

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 11:14am
There's a thread on Pistonheads forum that has a link to other articles, one of which included this information
Residents described hearing the frantic sounding of a horn just before the crash and police said early witness reports suggest the driver of the 32-tonne lorry lost control after taking evasive action to avoid an earlier accident. from http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... crash.html

Pistonheads thread also said that there are two width restriction sign on the road, but one of those had been flattened by an earlier incident.

More information from witnesses http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... crash.html

So very sad, whatever the cause.

Re: Taking a bike on a train

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 11:10am
As I have previously stated during other topics on this subject: Going to the commencement or returning from my many tours, in 14 years of taking my bike on trains I have never had a problem with any train operator. In fact there are quite a few times where I have experienced exceptional service from rail staff. I am sad to say I have witnessed some cyclists appearing to go to great lengths to p**s off otherwise helpful members of the railway community.

Re: Pannier Security on Tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 11:10am
I try to avoid leaving my bike on tour. I lock it up for quick trip into shop for drink/water.
Going to a supermarket. i carry the panniers round in a trolley.
Other than that mini padlocks to keep the paniers attached work well for a 5 minute stop.
If people want to rummage through my used underwear for valuables i'm not fussed. They go with me in my barbag.

Re: Pannier Security on Tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 10:50am
Carrying panniers around is easier with a shoulder strap or something. When shopping, they can be stuck in a trolley.

I have left them a couple of times, when the bike was locked and I was just going to be gone for a few minutes, but I always worry about them.

People do use alarms, locking nets, locking mounts and various other things. I'd rather just take my stuff with me.

Re: Tipper crash in Bath

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 10:41am
Thats how they are taught these days. In the early days we were taught to downchange because older braking systems were not adequate. Modern braking systems on cars are superb in comparison. But that driving style does not apply to laden trucks.
I don't think though that new car drivers are taught to approach a red light at speed and brake at the last minute. Or drive as close as possible to the car on front.
When I was taught to drive a truck it was always about smoothness and mechanical sympathy. You can't throw a truck about or your load would be all over the place and the vehicle becomes unstable. I'm totally confused how this young man came to be in the position of his truck [used to be called lorries, when I first started] carreering downhill, out of control. I really don't know how this young man has got in this position.
I have an idea but can't say.

Re: Pannier Security on Tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 10:40am
I have a small pad lock on my panniers and fits the the rack it stops someone just taking them off.

Re: Pannier Security on Tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 10:36am
The only single rule is common sense. What is right in one circumstance may be very wrong in another.

Ideally leave luggage at hotel, maybe bike as well in some places. In a small country town, probably safe to leave while shopping etc as long as bike is locked. I wouldn't leave it anywhere for too long unless under someone's supervision, eg security guard, car park attendant, food stall, shop owner, etc.

Most thieves don't understand panniers and would be reluctant to start fiddling in a public place.

I have never locked my panniers on, the only things I could use, straps, handles, etc could be easily cut. Not sure about those pacsafe cages, might make your stuff look more valuable.

Its one of the joys of cycle touring I am afraid.

Re: Is touring becoming a thing of the past?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 10:22am
To answer the title question, I would say definitely not.

The fact that most shops don't stock tourers is presumably down to the fact that they wouldn't sell many. If someone came in every day and asked to buy one, I imagine they would stock some.

My LBS used to be a Dawes stockist and I imagine they usually had a number of Galaxys (it was a bit before my touring days). In those days the Galaxy was I imagine as much a general purpose road bike as a bespoke tourer so sales were probably good.

They don't do Dawes now but carry a stock of MTBs but much less than a few years ago, roadbikes, hybrids, folders, etc. They are 'stockists' for Surly, but rarely have any in stock. Those who want order, usually frames which are built to owners spec. This has made the touring bike side of the business very specialised.

It seems that other niche bikes are similar, ie he may have one Brompton, but you would expect to order the exact one you want.

I am currently in Thailand and have met quite a few first time tourers and also a few Thai tourers (all Surly shod), so I definitely would not say it is a thing of the past.

What me a dinosaur????

Re: Cyclist defence fund Michael Mason

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 10:21am
Yes a sad tragic case.

Time for the "allegedly"...
This is what the met police are like allegedly. I doubt persuing the case will change the alleged corruption, and alleged incompetence of the police...not to mention the alleged laziness...allegedly
Allegedly I found out that if you've made a complaint to the police then they may not be so keen to help you in the future ... allegedly
Having allegedly sat in a police station, and allegedly seen a police officer lie, and allegedly distort evidence sadly I think its a waste of time.
Allegedly time over.

I wish Martin Porter all the best in a courtroom with this.

Re: Is touring becoming a thing of the past?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 10:16am
Full on multiple day touring (carrying your own stuff) is a niche leisure pursuit. Its never been mainstream and will remain so I believe. You have to have the time, an understanding partner, an independent spirit and the will to ride into the unknown.
Most virgin cyclists want a 'Racer' or a Mountain Bike so thats what shops stock. I always go in new bike shops to see what they have got and there are very few tourers on display. For day touring you dont need a tourer, anything will do. Thats why proper tourers are scarce.
I just wish I had been able to cycle tour earlier in my life when I was working and bringing up my family.

Al

Re: Is touring becoming a thing of the past?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 9:58am
I also think once you've bought a touring bike which is very reliable, you dont tend to need another... This doesnt pander to economics, and the buy more culture.

Re: Tipper crash in Bath

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 9:35am
thirdcrank wrote:Heltor Chasca wrote: ... The weight restriction sign banning such large vehicles on this road had been mowed down by a car weeks earlier and the council hadn't replaced it. ...

Are you sure about this? I'm interested because it would partly explain what I've been getting at above. OTOH, the streetview image to which I linked above showing width restriction signs but no weight restriction signs is dated August 2012. Also, signs of that type tend to be installed in pairs, as is the case with the width restriction signs here and one would normally remain in place if a crash knocked down the other.

Pretty certain. I read it on a Twitter feed. It was either Bath Chronicle or Somerset Guardian....hc

Re: Is touring becoming a thing of the past?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 February 2015 - 9:31am
The fact is that most tours are day tours and they don't need touring bikes. Any half-decent hybrid of today is easily better for a tour than my first "proper" touring bike (EBC Country, 1989). Given multi-day touring is a niche it's something probably worth visiting a specialist dealer.

I don't think touring is dying out, but I think it's quite possible the general availability of "normal" bikes has gone up a lot while the demand for tourers will have been reasonably static.

Pete.

Re: Tipper crash in Bath

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 9:09am
Tests have changed. When I took mine 20 years ago I was taught to downshift 1 gear at a time and always be in the right gear for the right speed. My wife who only passed 5 ish years ago was taught to brake down then shift to the appropriate gear even if that meant missing 1 or 2.

Re: Tipper crash in Bath

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 9:00am
According to the Guardian...
Police are continuing to investigate why the truck was on Lansdown Lane in Bath, where residents have long complained about lorries and other vehicles using it to skip around the centre of the city. The road has a width restriction but no weight limit.

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015 ... lip-potter

Re: Tipper crash in Bath

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 February 2015 - 8:49am
Heltor Chasca wrote: ... The weight restriction sign banning such large vehicles on this road had been mowed down by a car weeks earlier and the council hadn't replaced it. ...

Are you sure about this? I'm interested because it would partly explain what I've been getting at above. OTOH, the streetview image to which I linked above showing width restriction signs but no weight restriction signs is dated August 2012. Also, signs of that type tend to be installed in pairs, as is the case with the width restriction signs here and one would normally remain in place if a crash knocked down the other.
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