Feed aggregator

Re: Quick poll: Your touring accomm - tent, hostel, hotel?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 8 August 2014 - 7:57am
In a normal year, I like to get 14 days in at least. I usually stay in a motel on the first night if I travel to the start and on the last night. Rest is in the tent preferably but really depends on the tour.

Andrew

Re: Private 'toll road' - cyclists not welcome.

CTC Forum - On the road - 8 August 2014 - 1:56am
Jon Lucas wrote: I cannot understand how what is effectively a public road (even if privately owned, managed and financed) can be allowed to stay open without planning permission.
Two very different perspectives here. You view a road as a physical entity which is constructed. When new ones are planned they go through a long consultation process. One cannot be built without permission. That is the modern experience of creating motor roads.

Most highways however were never planned as such. They merely evolved through long custom or landowners' acquiescence. At the most basic level a highway is just a right of passage and our legal system still largely views highways as rights rather than things. As each landowner can use his land as he wishes, he is free to allow or charge others to use it. If he can choose to allow or charge individuals he can choose to allow or charge the public at large. The state would need a good reason to interfere with an individual's rights over his own land.

Re: Joining a road turning right

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 August 2014 - 11:13pm
TBH, I know the junction and I'm trying to get my head around what's happened.

I'm sure this is the junction: https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.76141 ... !2e0?hl=en

Here, a fairly busy dual carriageway A-road (A584) ends on an even busier single carriageway A-road (A583) at a traffic signalled T-junction. If memory serves both roads have a 50mph limit at the junction.

Jammylee's first picture shows the filter for traffic turning right onto the dual carriageway from the A583. I think this is the manoeuver being questioned. To my recollection there are no cycle facilities approaching this junction from that direction (though admittedly Streetview and I may be out of date). There is a cycle path crossing the junction (see jammylee's 2nd picture) but it is only to enable a right turn from the dual carriageway, it does not extend further west along the A583.

To my mind a cyclist has 2 legal options when executing the manoeuver. He can do as Jammylee observed and take the filter lane like the rest of the traffic or he can dismount and cross the road, join the cycle path and cross both carriageways of the dual carriageway before starting along it. The second option might be more realistic if we consider beginner cyclists or those who want to avoid traffic at all costs. In reality such a cyclist would never turn onto that dual carriageway. There are no segregated cycle paths along its length. There are some spectacularly dangerous narrow cycle lanes: https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.75991 ... !2e0?hl=en
Advisory lanes there but the other carriageway has mandatory ones with no repeater cycle markings or signs so they look like road edge markings: https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.75967 ... !2e0?hl=en
I haven't been down recently but unless they've altered it the dual carriageway changes to the national speed limit after a few hundred yards without any improvement in cycle facilities: https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.75899 ... !2e0?hl=en
It is safe to say that the nice traffic controlled junction is likely to have been the least of the cyclist's worries!

Re: Joining a road turning right

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 August 2014 - 10:43pm
I am well aware that it's bad form to criticise the grammar of a fellow forummer - especially a newbie - but I'm afraid this example takes the biscuit. I, too, cannot make head nor tail of it.
(Apologies for the clichés).

Re: Private 'toll road' - cyclists not welcome.

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 August 2014 - 10:34pm
thirdcrank wrote:If there wasn't a suggestion that cyclists were banned, would this have raised much discussion on here?Well - seeing as I started it - mea culpa. In other words, it was the presence of the 'no cyclists' factor that prompted me to fire off this thread in the first place. Admittedly, it was much more obvious in the paper version of the Grauniad (in which a picture of the sign appeared along with the article) - in the online version you have to run through the video.

But, as I admitted above, I was mistaken in my initial assumption that cyclists had nowhere to go. Perhaps it was the experiences I've had nearer home that biased me.

Anyway, nothing wrong with the discussion here - raised some useful points.

Re: Italy cycle resources?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 7 August 2014 - 9:53pm
GPS usually works fine in Italy on most of the the roads you see on the Touring 1:200,000 maps. Results are much less reliable on the smaller backroads in the countryside, especially the unpaved ones. In some regions there are quite a lot of little roads like these that are really lovely. In Tuscany, for example, they go through vineyards and olive groves and have very little traffic. But you will quickly get lost trying to navigate on them with a GPS.

Re: Wrong way up a one way street.

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 August 2014 - 9:18pm
I suspect the reason why many people in the UK (especially but not only motorists) don't like cyclists using one-way streets in both directions, whether legally or not, may be due to the difference in how one-way streets are provided in the UK compared to Continental Europe.

In the UK, they are put in fairly randomly, wherever either a highway engineer or councillors/lobby groups think they are needed. The usual reasons being:

a) a perception that it will help traffic flow (usually by creating a gyratory system)
b) where a road is too narrow (or more usually is made too narrow by parking provision) for two cars to pass each other without one of them having to pull into a space between parked cars, if one exists.

In many cities in Continental Europe one-way streets are the norm for many roads, especially main roads, regardless of width of road.

As such, the provision of a contra-flow facility for cyclists there becomes more accepted, whereas in the UK the public and highway engineers tend to feel subliminally that a one-way street has a 'reason' for having been installed, and therefore shouldn't be flouted.

Re: Private 'toll road' - cyclists not welcome.

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 August 2014 - 9:17pm
Afaik, highway authorities have powers over developments which will tend to increase traffic - and they usually seem to deal with this by extorting money from the developer to use on some quite unconnected traffic scheme. Indeed, this is one of their main sources of income apart from govt grants. OTOH, I wonder where they stand when a development demonstrably reduces traffic levels eg in this case by significantly shortening a large number of journeys.

If there wasn't a suggestion that cyclists were banned, would this have raised much discussion on here?

Re: Quick poll: Your touring accomm - tent, hostel, hotel?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 7 August 2014 - 9:03pm
About 20 nights a year, all camping these days. Campsites by preference, but about 10-15% wild if there's nothing nearby.

Re: Private 'toll road' - cyclists not welcome.

CTC Forum - On the road - 7 August 2014 - 9:02pm
gentlegreen wrote:I strongly suspect it would not be politically expedient to shut it down.

Sadly I suspect gentlegreen is correct, though I think allowing it to stay open throws open a whole host of issues which need resolving. Particularly what happens if the construction of this road affects the landslip below it, and causes the repairs to the landslip to take longer or be more expensive to fix, especially if there is a wet autumn (and in that case, if it doesn't have planning permission can the council close it down on safety grounds?) I cannot understand how what is effectively a public road (even if privately owned, managed and financed) can be allowed to stay open without planning permission, and allowing it to opens up the possibility of anyone with some land opening their own roads over it wherever they feel they could make money from it.

Re: Camping in Northern Spain

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 7 August 2014 - 9:00pm
I don't camp in Spain, economically it's pointless and it's too much hassle trying to find a non-RV site. Rooms are available everywhere, even if you cant "see" them, ask and you'll get something, in many tours I've never not got a room in Spain. For 2 travelling I'd expect rooms (with bathrooms, possibly with buffet breakfast, near amenities, bars etc ) to cost no more than camping, probably less, definitely a lot less hassle.

Re: Italy cycle resources?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 7 August 2014 - 8:11pm
I'm not sure why people are having problems with GPS? As per my previous post I used a Garmin 800 to Navigate top to bottom (Innsbruck to the Toe then back to Rome), and Venice to Nice (over the top). I did my route planning in advance using ridewithgps.com, downloaded my route to my garmin and followed it everyday

It got my from door to door of all my accommodation stops without any problems including right through the center of some big places like Rome, Florence, Sienna, Modena, Bologna, Merano, Regio, Allesandria,Tirano, Savona, San Remo, etc. I actually tried to avoid Naples but didn't realise how big it was and got caught in the busy suberbs. Cycled around Milan - I was staying directly above and heading directly below but took a wide detour

Play on Pedals in Glasgow Now

Play on Pedals blog - 7 August 2014 - 6:42pm

We’re in this week’s Glasgow Now – check it out on page 5 here: http://edition.pagesuite-professional.co.uk/Launch.aspx?PBID=077cec83-ca64-4c5b-a353-b58e262d6c53

Or see below…

Play on Pedals in Glasgow Now 6th August


Bikes arrive and receive new home

Play on Pedals blog - 7 August 2014 - 6:36pm

Our Play on Pedals bikes have now arrived and been assembled by volunteers and staff at the Glasgow Bike Station. 

This week we happily moved all of our new fleet into a fantastic free storage space at 100 Borron Street, thanks to the generosity of Scottish Canals. They now stand proudly upright in our genius recycled ‘Play on Pedals Palette Racks’.

Play on Pedals bike fleet line up in 100 Borron Street, with thanks to Scottish Canals

Once we have labelled each of them individually, the coming months will see these bikes head out on loan to our first pilot Hero Organisation North Glasgow Homes through their Sport Legacy Programme and will also be off to south Glasgow for use within some of the groups who have been involved in the pilot training programme that took place this summer.

These bikes will visit thousands of children across the city over the next fifteen months, before eventually being handed over to Hero Organisations to keep for use within their local communities, by nurseries and other pre-school establishments, once the Play on Pedals project comes to an end.

If you have already expressed interest in the Play on Pedals project then expect to hear from us soon about the next steps for your group. If you have not yet been in touch with Play on Pedals but would like to find out more about our People’s Postcode Lottery funded project, please get in touch with polly.jarman@ctc.org.uk.

 


Syndicate content

Archive

  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

Terms and Conditions