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Re: Reducing pannier weight

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 March 2015 - 8:49am
I got my first flip-flops since growing up last year and after the uncomfortableness of the between the toes bit had gone I found them actually very comfortable. This was car camping with family so I had a whole set of shoes for just in case but I often wore these. Mine were expensive Teva ones though, a guilty expense. Definitely a good footwear option for feet recovery IME.

If you do like Rohan then try and get to one of their stores for bargains but especially their one in IIRC Long Preston. Not sure if that was where they started but it is where they have bargain bins and sell stuff off very cheap. that is proper stuf still going well in their shops and online sales not just end of line and didn't sell well stuff. personally never found them any good since they changed the original uplanders trousers. Talk about cockroaches and these trousers surviving anything!!! I only grew out of mine or I;d still have them.

Re: Stuttgart and Bratislava Airports with bikes

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 March 2015 - 8:22am
I too have flown into Stuttgart with a bike and ridden, with ctc group, I do not recall any routes used but nor do I recall any issues, likewise arriving back there for our flight home.

Re: GPS or maps

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 March 2015 - 8:15am
I use an Etrex20/605 and plan all my tours online, I find once I've fettled my route to be exactly how I like it then I don't really need the etrex as I can usually remember most of it! A GPS is very, very handy for town navigation when getting away from stations, for example if the town features many closely spaced turns, and its always there to warn me if I go off course because I'm too busy sight seeing and miss even an obvious turn. Also very good for going off exploring and having the an easy view of just which road to retrace/use to regain the route (I never use the reroute function as the GPS may guess wrong as regards suitability of a road). Maps can do all of this but are a bugger in the wind and rain, and way bulkier on a big tour (or really poor scale) - and maps don't zoom

Re: Cleats and Crashes

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 March 2015 - 1:22am
Macc Lad wrote:
However, must admit I do have concerns about something like this happening again -- any advice, please, on what to do if you suffer a drastic loss of momentum on a hill and can't unclip in time?

As I said above it takes time...

There are several steep hills around here (Cornwall), many requiring uphill stops at road junctions and one outside my house. I practised by unclipping regularly (several times) on the hills half way up, then clipping in again. That reassurance really helped. At first I was taking my foot out on the steeper ones right at the start of the hill, but slowly it's got later and later. You get used to the position and force required (it's more it seems when you're pushing the pedal hard) so more confident that you'll do it when needed.

Keep clippping in and out in all sorts of situations and gradients until you feel that you can always do it anywhere anytime.

Re: Didn't know cyclists could be fined for speeding!

CTC Forum - On the road - 18 March 2015 - 12:34am
TC,

I think the "furious cycling" offences envisaged by previous posters were those not requiring another party to have been injured:
Nationally: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Wil ... section/78
if any person riding any horse or beast, or driving any sort of carriage, shall ride or drive the same furiously so as to endanger the life or limb of any passenger
Outside London http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Vic ... section/28
Every person who rides or drives furiously any horse or carriage, or drives furiously any cattle:
In London: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/Vic ... section/54
Every person who shall ride or drive furiously, or so as to endanger the life or limb of any person, or to the common danger of the passengers in any thoroughfare:

Applying only to public roads, I don't think any of those offences is applicable to the park road. Whereas, If I have understood your earlier posts on the subject, the Offences Against the Person Act offence applies everywhere so could be used if a cyclist was to harm a pedestrian within the park.

Re: Didn't know cyclists could be fined for speeding!

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 March 2015 - 11:46pm
thirdcrank wrote:This charge could never be used to get round the need for an NIP since it can only apply when there has been an "accident" within the meaning of that part of the Road Traffic Offenders Act which creates the requirement to serve an NIP, and provides an exception when there has been one.
Good spot.

Re: Didn't know cyclists could be fined for speeding!

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 March 2015 - 11:37pm
Well mine don't "bolt" uphill which only leaves one direction for them to "bolt" in.

Re: GPS or maps

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 March 2015 - 11:31pm
I use an etrex 20 which I find really good for touring and route finding, although you do need to spend some time learning to use it.

I have used the etrex on its own, but I think the best option, as has been said above, is to have paper maps as well.

Re: Cleats and Crashes

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 March 2015 - 11:30pm
I took up cycling again only last summer and was encouraged by friends to fit SPDs and cleats. Got on pretty well with them but had two or three incidents, mostly when stationary and poised on one leg, but forgetting the other was still clipped in, and toppling over.

Also had to perform a crash landing when I was riding up a steep-ish hill and ran out of steam, picked a soft bank to cushion the fall. Quiet road, quiet Sunday afternoon. so no harm done.

However, must admit I do have concerns about something like this happening again -- any advice, please, on what to do if you suffer a drastic loss of momentum on a hill and can't unclip in time?

Re: Sharing Garmin Maps between devices or using OSM

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 March 2015 - 11:27pm
Thanks. I've created the maps that I need using the instructions on the dcrainmaker site. Downloaded the route and it all looks fine although a bit light on POI's,so will also have a look at Mick's link

Re: Didn't know cyclists could be fined for speeding!

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 March 2015 - 11:27pm
Does a bicycle "bolt" downhill?

Re: Stuttgart and Bratislava Airports with bikes

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 March 2015 - 11:17pm
It's been a few years since I was there, but IIRC Stuttgart Airport wasn't too bad to get out of by bicycle. If I remember correctly, I asked at information, and they sent me out the south side of the airport buildings (maybe it was southwest), where there was employee parking and cycle racks, and a nice path going off to the west. It soon joined one that was sign posted to Stuttgart city centre. I don't remember other details, but you could try

http://www.radweit.de/index/entrance.html for routes?

Re: Didn't know cyclists could be fined for speeding!

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 March 2015 - 10:59pm
gaz wrote:Well I know you've emphasised the need to issue a NIP within 14 days of an alleged driving offence and also added that failure to issue a NIP can be used by the defence as a tactic to get a charge dismissed. So I expect a court would be quite likely to see a charge for wanton and furious driving as an abuse of process, if it were directed at the driver of a mechanically propelled vehicle.
Right area, but not what I was getting at.

This charge could never be used to get round the need for an NIP since it can only apply when there has been an "accident" within the meaning of that part of the Road Traffic Offenders Act which creates the requirement to serve an NIP, and provides an exception when there has been one.

Mistik-Ka

Whatever the grammar, in English law a mechanically propelled vehicle is what used to be termed a "motor vehicle" before the term was dropped because it had acquired too much baggage in the form of case law, restricting its meaning. Prior to that "mechanically propelled vehicle" was used in the vehicle licensing regulations. A pedal cycle is both a vehicle and a carriage. That bit of the advice is prompted by the fact that although there are offences of careless, inconsiderate and dangerous cycling which are equivalent to the motoring versions, there is no offence of causing death/ serious injury by cycling.

The main thing here about furious driving was that it was intended to deal with people who intentionally whipped-up their horses to go at speed, rather than people whose horse bolted.

Re: Reducing pannier weight

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 March 2015 - 10:53pm
rannochraider wrote:If you are going to replace the contents of your panniers with similar in Titanium you will save the weight of what was in your wallet for sure! Cycling and camping Light generally means expensive. Having said that I'll be watching this thread as I'm not at all experienced either. I'd love to see an inventory of what the experienced guys call a list of ' essentials' (items and brands)for a 2 week plus tour ?

The padlock I was on about is called "Titalium". Rather than being made out of titanium it's made from some sort of aircraft alloy: http://www.abus.com/uk/Security-at-Home ... s/TITALIUM

They're £8 for a pair (one for the bike and one for hostel lockers). Granted, this won't provide the level of security as the D-lock but there's no point in using an ultra secure lock on a wire whip because the thief would destroy the weakest link: The wire whip.


al_yrpal wrote:Weigh your clothes one by one and choose the lightest stuff its surprising with things like tee shirts and trousers what a massive overall saving can be made. Your shoe plan is spot on.

Al


You're right about that Al; I bought what I thought was a light pair of slim stretch jeans for evening wear but they weigh in at a whopping 534g! Now looking for some lightweight "slacks"


Thanks for posting the lightweight touring link nmnm it's very interesting.


Whoof you're spot on about cotton; it's heavy and desn;t perform well (I took loads of cotton last time). Man made fibres this time such as coolmax etc.

Tangled Metal thanks for sharing your practical experiences around carrying weight.

PH wrote:I think your idea with the shoes and whoof's suggestion that you go for clothes suitable on and off the bike is probably the biggest saving you'll make without compromising comfort too much. Though I like a change of footwear and take a 350g pair of sandals.

A friend gave me a great idea: Hotel slippers! He gave me a pair, advising they're widely available in pound shops (wonder how much they are ) and would be great for mooching around hostels after a long day in the saddle. They don't look like they'll last long but at 65g per pair I'll buy a couple more pairs to make the total 3 and chuck away a pair per week when they're knackered.


foxyrider thanks for your tips, you're spot on about the weight of some luggage being an important factor to consider. My old Agu panniers are very light (but admittedly not completely waterproof) but the Altura Dryline rackpack is considerably heavier (for what it can carry), however it's so easy to unclip it, extend the shoulder strap and carry as a manbag containing valuables that it's worth it's weight. Plus it is waterproof.

axel_knutt wrote:My problem is preventing the panniers getting heavier, because I have kit which is getting tatty and needs throwing out, but can't find replacements. .

I know what you mean, my old panniers are really light, roomy with pockets, easy to get at stuff and easy to quickly do up but most of the ones I see now have sacrificed much of this in the quest to be completely waterproof.

jgurney wrote:If your budget will stand it, look at lightweight clothing from firms like Rohan.

I have some of their t-shirts with weight and volume less than half than of typical cotton ones, and a 'spark' insulated top which weighs very little but is very snug and water-resistant (and reversible between yellow or dark blue).

Thanks I'll look at getting some Rohan stuff, still need a few more bits.

nmnm wrote:Foxy mentioned pool sandals. I made probably my best ever gram per £ saving by replacing a pair of pool sandals with another pair of the same. The old ones were 200g, the new were 120g or something, and £3 at tesco, because the soles were sort of blown foam rather than molded rubber. You can spend a lot to get 80g out of a cassette or a crankset!

That's a great idea. Maybe a pair of foamy flip flops is a viable alternative to hotel slippers? They'll last and weigh very little.

Thanks for your tips, any more will be much appreciated and if I find out any more I'll post them here too.

Re: Stuttgart and Bratislava Airports with bikes

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 March 2015 - 10:52pm
danube wrote:Thanks Mick. I'll email them so and try to get confirmation that a bag will be ok. That'd be great to save hassle with boxing on the way home.

One other thing (I'm assuming you haven't flown with bike before). Most airlines including Aer lingus 'suggest' you deflate the tyres, remove the pedals, turn the handlebars in line with the frame. So you'll need the tools with you and the ability to do this. Also I once flew back from Bratislava after cycling trip. Didn't have bike as we hired bikes but I had my tools in my hand luggage and almost had them confiscated.

Re: CPS Bloomer.

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 March 2015 - 10:44pm
thirdcrank wrote:
…when the vehicle used was not a mechanically propelled vehicle (such as a bicycle or horse drawn vehicle);


Well, um, grammatically the quotation indicates that bicycles and horse drawn vehicles are examples of mechanically propelled vehicles.

Ironically (and non-grammatically) I had been scratching my head about this earlier — surely a bicycle (unlike a horse-drawn vehicle) is mechanically driven? The power source is the rider, but propulsion is via the classic machinery of cog-wheels and a chain.

In support of my argument, M'lud, I respectfully submit that my stoker Mrs. M-k agrees, and it is generally accepted among tandemists that The Stoker Is Never Wrong.

Re: Stuttgart and Bratislava Airports with bikes

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 March 2015 - 10:41pm
Thanks Mick. I'll email them so and try to get confirmation that a bag will be ok. That'd be great to save hassle with boxing on the way home.

Re: Didn't know cyclists could be fined for speeding!

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 March 2015 - 10:12pm
Well I know you've emphasised the need to issue a NIP within 14 days of an alleged driving offence and also added that failure to issue a NIP can be used by the defence as a tactic to get a charge dismissed. So I expect a court would be quite likely to see a charge for wanton and furious driving as an abuse of process, if it were directed at the driver of a mechanically propelled vehicle.

Re: Didn't know cyclists could be fined for speeding!

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 March 2015 - 10:09pm
gaz

The bit you highlighted was one of my mistakes, not the CPS's. It is something which anybody who had read and absorbed my waffle about prosecuting bad driving should spot by working through the examples given in that link. Another clue: It's something I often emphasise to posters asking about reporting bad driving.

Re: Stuttgart and Bratislava Airports with bikes

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 March 2015 - 10:05pm
I've never flown Ryanair with the bike, but a quick search on their website says
'* Bicycles - MUST be contained in a protective box or bag in order to be accepted for travel. Electric bicycles cannot be carried'. I would send them an email to get their confirmation, then you can print and bring with you in case of problems.

Sorry can't help with the Garmin/recharging. I stay in B&B and recharge everything overnight. I have Garmin etrex 20 for touring and it uses 2 AA batteries so just carry a spare pack of cheap batteries in case.
There are plenty of threads on this forum about options for recharging on tour; use the search function or post a separate thread if you can't find what you need
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