Feed aggregator

Has anyone cycled EuroveloR1 all the way to St Petersberg

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 March 2015 - 2:11pm
I've organised myself a tour following the R1 to Berlin and intended cycling back. But all the way to St Petersberg keeps calling. It's not the distance as I've already done more than that. It's actually cycling outside of western Europe - Poland, Latvia, Estonia, Russia that's scary. Anyone had first hand experience. Happy to hear opinions too.

Re: Brakes work, shame brain doesn't

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 March 2015 - 1:55pm
Tonyf33 wrote:And at no point have I said the cyclist was without fault, just that the lorry was in the majority of fault here and was dangerous, according to 'Kwackers' it wasn't dangerous at all for the lorry to run a red light at such a busy intersection
As I pointed out both jumped red lights and only one ignored highway code advice about entering a junction that wasn't clear. I'd be interested in knowing how you square up the idea that the one with the least blame is actually the one who broke the most rules??

But you're right. In the instance above there's nothing particularly dangerous in what the lorry did, in theory you could have an entire procession of traffic for 10 minutes after the lights have changed and it wouldn't be dangerous - for normal folk. Obviously if you're blind and stupid then all bets are off.
Had the lorry not been part of a procession of traffic then it would have been dangerous but in the instance as shown it was simply an annoyance that was turned into danger by the stupidity of another.

Re: Where to cycle on semi-narrow lanes?

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 March 2015 - 1:55pm
Many lanes are roughly twice the width of a typical car, so cycling in primary position leaves an angry motorist room to push past on either side, just as long as they aren't bothered about leaving more than 3" of clearance.

Re: Brakes work, shame brain doesn't

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 March 2015 - 1:55pm
As has been said many times before crossing a red is not in itself a dangerous act. In fact the main reason for having traffic lights is to share out the use of the junction between both roads.

That doesnt stop crossing a red being a dangerous act on occasions just as pulling out from the minor road (without traffic lights) can be a dangerous act on occasions.

In this case the lorry driver may have been fully aware that there was gridlock and thought he could safely force his way through when it wasnt his right to do so. Being rammed by a cyclist who is setting off is not an everyday occurrence.

Re: Brakes work, shame brain doesn't

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 March 2015 - 1:50pm
Okay, it wasn't dangerous to anyone I'm sure the authorities across the land fully agree and past fines refunded due to it being a ridiculous notion that running a red light isn't dangerous..
that's truly enlightening.

Re: Brakes work, shame brain doesn't

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 March 2015 - 1:43pm
according to 'Kwackers' it wasn't dangerous at all for the lorry to run a red light at such a busy intersection

Because of the low speed that traffic was assumed to be doing, it was only dangerous if somebody was not looking where they were going.
However if there wasnt traffic stuck at the lights and some car was on the road the cyclist was on already doing 30mph and luckily had the lights change in front of them then the truck driver's actions may well have been lethal and nobody would blame anybody but him.

The difference here is that cyclists are seen as slow and able to stop easily, so it is quite safe to pull out in front of them. Which is pretty much accepted by most people, even cyclists it seems.

Re: Brakes work, shame brain doesn't

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 March 2015 - 1:37pm
Edwards wrote:The timing of the Traffic Lights changing does seem to be short. However that does not say the truck driver is not wrong.

If this is the standard of cycling not just by one but a good few cyclists in the film then I am not surprised that so many cyclists get killed in London.
<moderated>

This post has been moderated because it was a direct question to Tony. It was meant in jest and not to be taken seriously.
So I apologise if any offence was caused that was not the intention. I was trying to convey how embarrassing this incident must be for the cyclist. Especially if he is identified.
You can PM me your question if you're desperate to know the answer to it, I haven't being on so haven't seen it so can't be offended by it. Just don't be surprised if the answer isn't the one you're hoping for especially if it is a particularly obtuse and/or stupid question

Re: Brakes work, shame brain doesn't

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 March 2015 - 1:36pm
Ellieb wrote:2. The lorry was at the stop line when the light phase was already changing for the cyclists, given the width of the junction this would indicate that the lights had already being on red for a good 3-4 seconds and amber for longer.
3. The cyclist whilst beyond the stop line (as were many others) had not gone 'through' the lights or the junction before the lights went green.
Yes, but these aren't really facts are they. You don't know & I don't know how long the lights for the lorry have been red. If it is a good 3-4 seconds then both the taxi & the boris bike have also jumped the lights. You are just making a supposition and there is no evidence for it. Secondly: The cyclist has gone through the lights on red. Not only has he passed over the solid white line (which is what the legal offence technically is) but the light you can see is a repeater. It is the second of two lights with the first one being on the stop line mounted on the lamp post. If you want to be pedantic about it, if he isn't past the repeater while it is still on red & amber then he is inches away from doing so. So as people keep saying: They both jumped the lights.

My take on it is that what the lorry does is, sadly, not unusual and anyone riding in a large urban area will see motor vehicles doing that many times a day. It does not excuse what he does, It is still ilegal, but it is hardly out of the ordinary. What the cyclist does, however, is not what one might expect to see. To completely ignore a large vehicle, which is clearly continuing across the junction in plain view, just isn't 'normal'. It takes two to make an accident, but I know which of the two protagonists behaviour I am most surprised by.

Er, yes they REALLY are facts, it isn't supposition at all..Or are you suggesting that the light phase for the lorry would remain green whilst the light changes to green for the carriageway perpendicular to it (the one with the cyclists on it)?
If so then you don't understand light phase changes and the built in timings especially for wider junctions where it takes longer to get across, light phase changes that are designed around avoiding conflict between the traffic coming from different directions. Clearly you and others just can't accept that as actual real life..er FACTS
And what bit of point three isn't a fact, can you not see the still picture that I extruded from the video?
And at no point have I said the cyclist was without fault, just that the lorry was in the majority of fault here and was dangerous, according to 'Kwackers' it wasn't dangerous at all for the lorry to run a red light at such a busy intersection

Re: Zeebrugge to 'south of Brussels'

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 March 2015 - 1:07pm
You can cycle from Ghent to Brussels mosttly on canal path, too.

Old Schelde to Melle, and Schelde to Wintam, both, partly on road and partly on river/canalside path, then Willebroek Canal to Brussels.

You can, then take the Charleroi canal south from Brussels.

https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mi ... 8,4.938354 has camping places in Belgium

and http://www.fietsroute.org/Long-Distanceroutes-LF.php or http://www.gamber.net/cyclebel/index.htm for waterways routes.


Have fun

Zeebrugge to 'south of Brussels'

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 March 2015 - 12:22pm
Hi, I'm planning on a coast to coast from Zeebrugge to Narbonne. I am planning on following this...
http://www.cyclingeurope.nl/cycling/rou ... /index.php
...which I am hoping to connect with somewhere south of Brussels.

Zeebrugge to Ghent seems OK - there's a canal path I think. But does anyone have experience of the best way to cycle from Ghent around the south of Brussels to link up, maybe around Namur? I'll need a campsite in the Ghent area too.

Cheers

Will

Re: Where to cycle on semi-narrow lanes?

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 March 2015 - 11:49am
If there isn't room to share comfortably at more than 20 or 30 mph, take the lane in a position where a car or larger motor vehicle cannot pass, or must use the next lane to pass. When the driver has slowed the vehicle, or stopped to wait for you, if it is safe to do so, move over and let them past. If it isn't safe, stick to the position until it is safe.

Parked cars can be useful, as they slow other traffic. Ride out, at least 'the width of a door and a little bit more', or take the lane. If it's parked up to become sinlge lane, ride right down the middle, as if you were driving a car.

However... don't play chicken. If a driver is behaving in an intimidating way, it may be wise to get out of the way. Similarly, if the vehicle comes too close without slowing, dive for cover. I've not had that sort of thing happen often; only once or twice that I can recall, but be wary for it.

If the road is winding, you may want to change position to improve your visibility round the bend. That means both your ability to see, and others' ability to see you.

p.s. ask for a copy of Cyclecraft for your next birthday

Re: Where to cycle on semi-narrow lanes?

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 March 2015 - 11:39am
I came to the conclusion the OP was talking about urban traffic lanes not country lanes.

Re: Where to cycle on semi-narrow lanes?

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 March 2015 - 11:28am
The OP describes a road approx 3.5 metres is how I took it.

Re: Where to cycle on semi-narrow lanes?

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 March 2015 - 10:59am
I think that there may be some confusion here as to what was meant by 'lane' in the OP.

Are we using the term 'lane' to mean your half of the road, or to mean the total width of a narrow country road?

Obviously the approach is different as with the former the overtaking car has an extra 'lane' to move into to get past (assuming nothing coming the other way, etc), but in the latter it might well be a case of waiting for a passing point or voluntarily jumping into the hedge to let the following car past.

Re: Route Help for Ealing (W5) to Slough (SL1)

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 March 2015 - 10:52am
jgurney wrote:[XAP]Bob wrote: there appears to be a fairly convenient train line which might suffice for one direction?

That line does not carry cycles on trains towards London in the morning peak or away from London in the evening peak. I'm not clear which way round the OP is planning to travel. Even going against the peak London flow, which is theoretically allowed, the trains are often very full with commuters going to Slough and students going to Langley and Southall Colleges, and it may be impractical to load a bike on.

So do the cycle shuffle:
cycle to work
train home
train to work
cycle home

Repeat.
Possibly with a folding bike being stored at the "other" location if the trip to/from the stations warrants it...

This does raise the slight issue of the week having an odd number of days ;(

Re: Garmin eTrex help needed

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 March 2015 - 10:51am
Have a look at the Aukadia website - it has lots of useful pages with tips for using older Garmins as well as current ones.

You could start here, with Three ways to beat the Waypoint limit. It's worth exploring the site thoroughly, even though it is quite demanding on the old grey cells!

Re: Chromebook for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 March 2015 - 10:27am
Its a bit of thread drift but... I think cycle.travel works out the most direct traffic free route, thus it only offers one. You can drag any node on its route to do a 'via' if you wanted to for instance pass through a particular town village or place. It then recalculates making the best of that. I find it quite flexible.

And PC World have knocked 20 quid off the Chromebook making it £170!

Al

Re: Route Help for Ealing (W5) to Slough (SL1)

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 March 2015 - 10:24am
[XAP]Bob wrote: there appears to be a fairly convenient train line which might suffice for one direction?

That line does not carry cycles on trains towards London in the morning peak or away from London in the evening peak. I'm not clear which way round the OP is planning to travel. Even going against the peak London flow, which is theoretically allowed, the trains are often very full with commuters going to Slough and students going to Langley and Southall Colleges, and it may be impractical to load a bike on.

Re: Weight distribution.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 March 2015 - 10:18am
I think it depends hugely on the geometry of your bike's steering and how wide (and what type) your handlebars are. In my experience 90's MTB frames seem quite happy with rears only even with a full 13kg camping load. It also depends on how much stuff you take! I wouldn't want 20kg on the rear only, regardless of steering, simply to reduce the load on the rear wheel.

Load your bike up with the heavy stuff, get it to balance then give the light remainder to your wife. She might need front panniers for bulky things like sleeping bags.

Re: Weight distribution.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 March 2015 - 9:49am
I've not checked the weight distribution between front and rear panniers but I ride with a single rear Ortleib roller classic and a tent at the rear and a bar bag and two small Carradice panniers on the front. Mrs Whoof rides with a single Ortleib roller classic on the rear rack and a bar bag. When we get to a mountain I take her rear pannier. Last year riding up the Ventoux this made things pretty even.
Syndicate content

Archive

  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

Copyright © CTC 2015

Terms and Conditions