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Re: news paper nutcase

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 6:03pm
Personally I would say respond. More to counter the many who will have read and believed the author. The author will probably never change his/her mind. But those reading and inclined to will accept what was said.

But, if you can I'd respond with as many facts as possible rather than just denials. e.g. epileptic fits from flashing only occur when flashing frequency is x to y and bike lights use a frequency of .... No BS standard lights are readily available so to comply with the law cyclists must use flashing lights ... Cyclists do not use torches but special cycle lights specifically designed ... Would <original author> rather cyclists go unlit and just get crushed under vehicles who cant see them, etc. (I don't know the facts so the e.g's are not suggested ones as they may be wrong).

Ian

Re: news paper nutcase

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 6:02pm
I'm in two minds. Overly bright flashing lights are a pet annoyance of mine.

You could ask why something would be more likely to dazzle during daylight hours. You could point out that the DfT mandates flashing frequencies which are unlikely to cause epileptic fits. You could ask whether the much brighter flashing lights on emergency vehicles pose a danger and ought to be removed. You could write and ask them to publish a similarly patronising statement addressing all motorists and telling them how to use and adjust their headlights so that they do not dazzle other road users. You could point out that pedestrians are road users...

Or you could put it in the recycling and forget all about it

news paper nutcase

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 5:52pm
My local free-sheet arrived today and in the letters column was this :-
I would like to address all cyclists in the area and advise them of the dangers of using flashing lights on their bikes. Flashing lights such as those available for bicycles can cause many reactions to those of us unfortunate enough to come across them. Epileptic fits, migraines, dizziness and disorientation can all be triggered by these lights. It is extremely frightening and unpleasant to find yourself unable to see whilst at the wheel of a car all because a cyclist has gone by with a flashing light. I implore any cyclist reading this to think about other road users and pedestrians before they turn their lights to the flashing setting, especially during the daylight hours. It can cause accidents.
I am in two minds about whether to respond to this or to ignore the anti-cycling, inaccurate garbage that this letter represents. After all, nonsense like this is printed purely to spark a reaction. So - what should I do? Please submit your suggestions

Re: Single Speed Freewheel Day Trips

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 November 2014 - 5:47pm
I don't ride a SS (yet), but do yearn for that simplicity. I wondered what sort of gearing you all pull. I was talking to a guy from a shop in Wells a while back and he rides 70" <gulp>. I'd have to push it everywhere except for down hill:-(

Cheers
Barry

Re: My worst tour, and why..

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 November 2014 - 5:46pm
Surely the saving aspect of a bad tour is the grim satisfaction you get from looking back at it.

Re: Single Speed Freewheel Day Trips

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 November 2014 - 5:41pm
I used to use single freewheel over fifty years ago. With my aged legs I haven't the strength for the climbs.
I think it's a good idea in the winter with all the muck on the roads - if you are up to it

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 5:30pm
Mistik-ka wrote:Mark1978 wrote:The 'road' below is about as wide as a single track road but is easily wide enough for two way cycling with room to spare.
Blimey, that looks like heaven!
Except for the maintenance problem (thanks to the unique way it isn't funded by our government), West Norfolk actually does better than that in places - single-and-a-half track, so that cycles don't have to stop for motor vehicles accessing the few properties on the cycleway:

If only every cycleway here was at least as good.

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 3:47pm
Mark1978 wrote:Mick F wrote:There are no hills. Cycling on the flat is boring.No variety is boring. I agree, I really do.

With hills, you get ups as well as downs, plus some flatter bits thrown in.
I can be slogging up a hill at 5mph and a few minutes later hurtling down the other side in excess of 30mph.
That's variety.

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 2:36pm
Mick F wrote:Mistik-ka wrote:Mark1978 wrote:The 'road' below is about as wide as a single track road but is easily wide enough for two way cycling with room to spare.
Blimey, that looks like heaven! No it doesn't.
There are no hills. Cycling on the flat is boring.

No variety is boring. Quite often on my rides it's hills or nothing, and *that* gets boring quickly too. In any case the point I was making was about ex-railway alignments and the likes, which are usually at cycling friendly grades, but that doesn't mean they are easy, there's one which I use for training because although it isn't very steep it's several miles of constant unremitting gradient, so is quite testing. Plus is one of the examples of a previous gravel path which has been tamacced and makes an ideal all weather surface.

Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 November 2014 - 1:32pm
Paulatic wrote:South West (direction)
Direction to South-West (North-East wind) or South-West wind?

Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 November 2014 - 1:28pm
South West (direction)

Castlemilk Instructor Training 25th November

Play on Pedals blog - 27 November 2014 - 1:26pm

We had great fun at Castlemilk Community Centre on Tuesday, training nursery staff from nurseries including the Jeely Piece Club, Jeely Play Zone, Castlemilk Day Nursery, Indigo Nursery, St Fillian’s and Cassiltoun Stables Nursery, as well as a  volunteer from Drumchapel who joined to learn about how to develop Play on Pedals in her area.

Staff at the Castlemilk Community Centre gave us all day access to their hall for free and we were very fortunate to work with some fantastic children from Castlemilk Day Nursery in the afternoon.

We were also joined by a film crew from Media Trust who are making a feature about Play on Pedals for the Community Channel (to be aired early Jan), so participants had the added delight of being filmed riding bikes (some for the first time in 13 years) in front of the camera. Luckily, we had some keen and up for it attendees who made the whole day lots of fun.

We were all really impressed by the children in the afternoon who were completely unfazed by the cameraman or the presenter. A member of the nursery staff from Castlemilk Day Nursery, who was on the training, said she was particularly proud of the children, some of whom are often shy and less comfortable engaging with groups but who fully embraced the session and were perhaps the most talkative and active!

It is great to hear these kinds of comments coming from staff who know the children attending and can see a marked difference in their behaviour. We expect a lot from the children who participate in these training days; being instructed by new adults, with other people observing and supporting the games and in totally new surroundings – it would be understandable if children found this overwhelming. However, almost without exception, these training days have highlighted that children are so focused and engaged with the bikes and the games that they don’t even notice the adults around them and react positively to new people giving instructions.

One of the children at this training even went as far as to create new games for us to play, saying he wanted to go in and out of the cones and that they were volcanoes that might erupt if you touch them – great imaginative ideas being expressed!

We had time for some really useful feedback after each of the delivery sessions, talking with participants about what they felt went well (confidence working with children, delivery of one-on-one naming bike parts games, for example) and what could be improved upon (structured lay out of games and clear coloured ordering of cones for example, or more opportunity for children to play all together) – and it was clear to see this feedback working for the second group.

The Jeely Piece Club, as the Castlemilk Hero Organisation, will now work closely with the other nurseries to distribute out the bikes and Play on Pedals will return early next year to deliver maintenance training and a bike swap.

Some photos from the session:

Jumping with frogs legs, two feet at once

Naming the bike parts at the start of the session

Lifting our feet up to balance; we discussed the layout of these cones and decided that it would have been clearer for participants to lay out the same colour cones for each lane so it was not so confusing for children.

Laying out cones for games; in feedback we talked about how best to engage children in the sessions and decided perhaps it would have been better for them to help collect the cones rather than lay them out as we had some interesting arrangements of cones!

Children having their first goes on the balance bikes – we discussed how the instructor should not be scared to let the children control their own balance on these bikes, rather than support them because they will use their feet to stop from falling off.

The children decided they wanted to play their own game, going in and out of the cones which were volcanoes that might erupt! One child wasn’t scared of erupting volcanoes however, he could blow the dust away which was lucky for him!


Re: Need advice on a bike tour of Scotland

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 November 2014 - 1:25pm
andrew_s wrote:The route from Stornoway to Lochmaddy heads SW across wide open ground....
Sorry but what is it SW?

Re: Single Speed Freewheel Day Trips

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 27 November 2014 - 1:22pm
Mine I normally go up to around 70 miles on (which is my normal limit on a multi geared bike as well these days), riding out from Birmingham across the gently rolling bits of south staffs and north warcs.

Also use it for club runs as it's faster than my multi geared bikes.

It is a 653 race frame with race blade mud guards and a carradice large saddle bag so it's sort of audaxy by nature. Used to have drops but now fitted with flats due t neck injury.

I find that I enjoy the simple, faff free ride of it.

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 12:38pm
Hi,
meic wrote:As a Sustrans Ranger I have always raised complaint about barriers, a bit of a personal hobbyhorse. My Coordinators always declare that they too have objected and the barriers are imposed by either private landowners (understandable) or the Council. The Council often cite the Police as declaring it a condition for getting consent for the path, I always ask how or why the Police have any say in this and the answer is along the lines of "that's how it is".
Interesting "meic" why would the police be getting involved here/ are council trying to steer you clear of the real reasons, my cynic mind says someone is making money by getting involved with making something thats not really wanted or needed by the real users.
Dig out the official line on the barriers, but you might bang your head on the glass first.....you probably know as we do that its just mates...........

My local council as all councils are quoting cut backs for deminishing services, so they close public toilets or just get the contractors who wallow around in new vans with expresso in hand and another mate to hold the keys even though the council admit that their relationship with the main contractor is "Frosty"
Or hand the stinking toilets to the local action volunteers, despite the leader of the council being sacked....he hangs on to his Moyoral powers and plants some more Palm Trees outside on the highway privately owned and made luxury penthouses....................

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 12:15pm
PH wrote:The radical question is not how to change some peoples mode of transport, but why are we travelling so much anyway?
The UK follows the longest working day in Europe with he longest commute. Not that Europe is a shining example, but it would at least be a start. Despite a generation of amazing technological advance, I'm still expected to work the same hours as my father, why? Why are people travelling so far to work? Why do people need to consume so much? If we're not producing great wealth why are we putting so much effort in? If we are, where is it going
Don't get me wrong, getting more people to cycle rather than drive would be a good thing, but it's not nearly enough to stop us running into that wall.

Technology can be an enabler for good. Over 25% of the organisation I work for are now permanent homeworkers - able to log on to corporate systems and send and receive e-mail through their broadband connection. This wouldn't have been possible even 10 years ago. So that's 500 people who no longer commute to work, but work from the home office or dining room table. A good proportion of the rest are occassional homeworkers, including me. We also make great use of teleconferencing and webinars (web-based seminars), so no longer have to travel to face to face meetings.

It just needs a change of culture within an organisation to allow this to happen.

However, this way of working brings it's own problems - feelings of isolation and loneliness amongst homeworkers being one.

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 11:30am

I know.
I was just being obtuse a bit.

Re: Using cycle paths

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 10:40am
Mistik-ka wrote:[XAP]Bob wrote:You can't rely on getting off cycle paths, particularly in a new area. Therefore you can't use them...
Quite so. (Thanks, Bob, reohn2, and others; this topic has obviously struck a nerve with a number of people )

Trying to make the best of a bad situation, are there any on-line mapping sites which indicate the presence — if not the nature — of barriers on cycle paths? At the moment I'm reduced to using the street views in the Journey Planner on Cyclestreets.net to check for tandem traps where cycle paths intersect with google-mapped roads … a laborious process and not always satisfactory. (Should I post this as a separate thread? It is about using cycle paths, but is perhaps it's a bit of a diversion on an already-existing diversion … about diversions. )
You should probably post a new threads.

Cycle Streets and Sustrans are probably the best sources of information. They do mark barriers on some paths. However, not all barriers are indicated on thir maps. CycleStreets depends upon people reporting them to either CycleStreets or the open mapping that it is based upon. Sustrans has some, but not all barriers marked on their maps. If it's an NCN, the best thing to do is check the sustrans map(s), and contact the Ranger for the area(s), and ask if there are barriers that aren't marked on the maps. Otherwise, cycle paths are best avoided, as there is no guarantee that they will be useable with a touring tandem.

p.s. I like the term 'tandem traps'; it is very descriptive. I just wish we didn't need a term to describe them!

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 10:37am
Mick F wrote:There are no hills. Cycling on the flat is boring.

To post that is to miss the point by a mile!

Re: Is it time for radicalism?

CTC Forum - On the road - 27 November 2014 - 10:34am
snibgo wrote:
I think UK society is dysfunctional. We have become addicted to cars, and have adapted our society to the needs of cars, to the detriment of humans. This has been gradual but persistent over many decades.

Can we kick the addiction? Not easily, and not willingly. Without a massive incentive, we will become more dysfunctional.

My conclusion: we will grow more obese, more unfit, and die early through pollution and lack of exercise.

Exactly!

And unless we change it'll cost us dearly as a nation and individually,in health and wealth.
Of course,some will prosper as a result.............
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