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Re: New Route Planner

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 August 2014 - 10:14am
Nope, that was a result of me fixing the PDF export and not turning the elevation back on! Fixed now.

Re: Do I need front panniers for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 August 2014 - 9:59am
bikes4two wrote:A fair point - one of our club members, whilst cycling in India, had their bar-bag literally ripped off the handlebars by the pillion rider on a moped! That was her passport, phone, ipod and other essentials gone - it makes you think?

A bit off topic but out of interest, where/how would you recommend carrying said valuables?

Some barbag mounts are lockable (i.e. Klickfix, Ortlieb). While it's not gonna stop anyone opening it up and having a rummage, it at leasts keeps it from being lifted in a split second. Quite handy when you're parked up a outside cafe or whatnot and the bike is locked and in line of sight.

I keep my passport buried deep in the main panniers, my wallet and phone stays on me. I wouldn't put anything essential in the barbag anyhow, just stuff I want to hand like maps, guidebooks, glasses, etc. Problem is a thief doesn't know that.

If the OP decides not to bother with front panniers, a barbag is still well worth considering. Just so handy to be able to stop and immediately access certain things just by popping the lid open.

Re: New Route Planner

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 August 2014 - 9:59am
The ELEVATION profile button doesn't seem to be working on a couple of routes I looked at yesterday. ( also today )

Chromium, Ubuntu 14.04, . . . .popups blocked . . . . Is it just me / my config ??

Re: Ten Miles a Day

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 9:58am
Three weeks lazing about in Europe with only one cycle ride has dented my average a little.

Need to get some big rides in (or start commuting).

Currently sitting at 11.5 miles per day so still way ahead of last year at least!

Re: Giant Defy or TCR Composite range

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 9:53am
Thanks Andy. There is too much choice IMO when trying to get a first road bike. I don't want to upgrade later, but want to choose a reasonably good bike, preferably Carbon.
I can test rides some bikes in my LBS , but others I can't and I suppose I will rule those ones out. So I am limiting myself to the big brands which may be fine, except they can cost more.

Rules out Chain Reaction bikes, Planetx, and Ribble.

Re: Shock finding: cycling causes weight loss

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 9:43am
Profile.jpg

Some people do lose weight when they exercise and indeed I used to when I was a lot younger, but now don't.
However, overall, the effect is pretty poor, on average, in scientific trials..

The above photo shows me on the left, savagely fit inside the fat, in about 2008. Cycling 7000m per year.

In the middle and on the right, cycling a bit less but on much reduced carbs and most importantlly, not hungry at all.

Re: Panniers vs Courier Bag (Commuting)

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 9:42am
brooksby wrote:Does using panniers instead of a backpack go with "maturing" as a cyclist?
I think so. I spent several years commuting with a small rucksack but eventually realised that carrying stuff on the bike instead of on me made the ride more enjoyable.

Re: Giant Defy or TCR Composite range

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 9:36am
They're very well regarded at entry level(although the tyres are terrible) and I've got plenty of mileage out of mine and if I was to get another non carbon bike i'd definitely stay with the Defy

Beyond entry level if I go for a carbon i'd probably stick with Defy although I would try others as well

Re: Shock finding: cycling causes weight loss

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 9:30am
Gearoidmuar wrote:Exercise is pretty poor for weight loss. It mostly just stimulates your appetite so that you eat more to compensate for the energy expenditure. My basis for this statement it twofold. Firstly, it's my personal experience over 30 years of cycling. Secondly, that is what published series find.
Anecdotally that's not what I find.

I go through periods of low levels of exercise, my weight usually moves up (around 13.5 stone). Then there'll be a shift, for example my commute will increase to near 30 miles a day, I'll eat like a pig and lose weight.
This year as part of my old age crisis I decided I wanted to break a 19 minute 5k, 40 minute 10k and 1h30 min half marathon (and get as close to a 3 hour marathon as I could) so I started running a lot more. Again weight falls off and I start to eat like a pig.

I'm sure it's more complex than that, but that's how it seems to work.
I would agree with the statement that people are lazy because they're fat and not the other way round, ime that seems to hold.

Re: New Route Planner

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 August 2014 - 9:24am
It's somewhere between the second and the third!

It tends to trip up if there's only one route out of a town, in a given direction, that it considers good enough; and because it rejects anything where the inbound and outbound routes are more than n% similar, it therefore works better on longer journeys. So, for example, for Oxford to Evesham it'll find a circular route no problem (50 miles one way); but for Oxford to Charlbury (15 miles) it won't.

I've got a medium-term ambition to completely rewrite the back-end handling of circular routes to make them much better, but in the short term I'll see if there's anything I can do to make it a bit more tolerant.

Re: Shock finding: cycling causes weight loss

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 9:21am
TonyR wrote:Gearoidmuar wrote:Exercise is pretty poor for weight loss. It mostly just stimulates your appetite so that you eat more to compensate for the energy expenditure.

And yet there is a strong inverse correlation between levels of obesity and levels of active transportation (walking, cycling).

That is indeed true, Tony. But the reason is not what one intuitively thinks..

When you are obese, you are always hungry. That's due to biochemisty. The body tries to conserve calories, as the cells are hungry and it does this in two ways.
One, it reduces your metabolic rate. Two, it makes you lazy by some mysterious effect on the brain.
People are not fat because they're lazy. It's the other way round.
If you put them on a low carb diet, they erupt with energy. This is a constant finding.

Panniers vs Courier Bag (Commuting)

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 9:20am
I commute to work by bike. There are three routes I can take. One is flatter, mostly shared-use and about ten miles one way. One is an off-road riverside cycle path which is muddy and gravelled, about seven miles one way. The third is part shared-use and part on-road, very hilly, and about six and a half miles. All three take about the same time to travel (I usually take the longest route, so I'm doing about twenty miles a day).

When I first started cycle commuting about three and a half years ago, I - as you do - bought a Chrome Citizen courier bag. But after a few months, my LBS discussed fitting a rear rack and buying panniers. I did, and now use one Carradice A4 pannier every day (I have another the same for if it is laundry day - taking shirts for the week into the office - or if I am going shopping). My usual load is a diary, notepad, phone, wallet, heavy D-lock, cable lock, and my toolkit (cycling multitool, non-cycling multitool, spare tube, tyre levers).

I still think the courier bag looks "cooler" (sorry), but every time I think I will use it again I get it loaded up of an evening, then get up in the morning, look at it, and then unpack it and put it all back into my pannier. I find the idea of lugging everything around on my back horrible, now. So the expensive Chrome courier bag, designed for cycling, is never actually used by me when I'm on a bike.

I've clearly been spoilt by using a pannier - is it just me? Does using panniers instead of a backpack go with "maturing" as a cyclist?

Re: Shock finding: cycling causes weight loss

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 9:06am
Gearoidmuar wrote:Exercise is pretty poor for weight loss. It mostly just stimulates your appetite so that you eat more to compensate for the energy expenditure.

And yet there is a strong inverse correlation between levels of obesity and levels of active transportation (walking, cycling).

Re: Giant Defy or TCR Composite range

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 8:42am
Hi , Thank you. Thought I was getting a carbon frame for a good price. Never mind. I think the Defy bikes are very popular?

Re: Shock finding: cycling causes weight loss

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 8:31am
Exercise is pretty poor for weight loss. It mostly just stimulates your appetite so that you eat more to compensate for the energy expenditure. My basis for this statement it twofold. Firstly, it's my personal experience over 30 years of cycling. Secondly, that is what published series find.
Now, what's wrong here?
The latest info is that what decides your weight is the body's homeostatic mechanisms to maintain a flow of fuel to the cells. What decides this is the level of insulin in the blood. What affects this is two things. The macronutrient (fat, carbs, protein) mixture you eat AND your genes.
If you are genetically insulin sensitive (you don't need a high level of insulin to drive sugar into your cells), you will remain thin no matter what your diet is. This is so for roughly 30% of the population.
If you are insulin resistant, the ready flow of fuel to your cells is impeded by insulin (above a certain level, insulin blocks the egress of fatty acids from fat stores) if you eat a high-carb diet, but is corrected if you eat low carb (how low depends on your genes). If you persist on the high carb diet, the insulin will stimulate your appetite until you reach a state of adiposity wherein there is readier diffusion of fatty acids out of fat cells, and you have your new steady state (fatter than if you didn't eat the carbs.). So for the insulin-resistant, your carb level titrates your weight. Sugar of course, is the real bad boy.

Anyone who wants to read all this stuff (it's not that easy to read for someone with no biological knowledge) the best book by far is Gary Taubes' Good Calories, Bad Calories, called the Diet Delusion in the UK. It's the result of many years of research on his part.

Re: Whats wrong with Portugal?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 August 2014 - 7:50am
binsted wrote:... downloaded OSM and found them excellent ...
+1
I've been travelling throughout Portugal quite extensively using a combination of OSM-OFM-Velomap digital maps.
I've found them extremely detailed with always pretty reliable indications of tracks, dirt roads, minor tarmac roads, rivers, power lines, farms, etc.
Of course even main roads as well as IPs and ICs highways, respectively Itinerario Principal and Itinerario Complementar, are very well indicated.
NEVER needed any type of paper maps, not inside big conurbations like Lisboa and Porto nor in the most remote parts of the Country.
REMARK: Velomap and OFM are complete of relevant elevation data that allow you to work-out pretty reliable elevation profiles as well as gradient, cumulative climbing, etc.

Re: Ten Miles a Day

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 7:36am
My 26 mile commute raises my daily average by 0.008 miles/day.

If I miss days commuting, I will have to do some evening or weekend mileage.

Re: First EVER Tour! (and I'm going RTW)

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 August 2014 - 6:44am
Hello James... Just in awe with your planned trip. I love your attitude and outlook on life & I'm sure the trip will be life changing. Just had a lovely read here of your blog and will be following you on twitter also. Best of luck & take good care..

Re: Giant Defy or TCR Composite range

CTC Forum - On the road - 21 August 2014 - 1:59am
Only the Defy Advanced has a carbon frame, not the std 'defy which is aluminium', the TCR again comes in a std 'TCR' frame and the higher specced/better frame (if you will) 'Advanced' model,
just have a look on the Giant website for the differences.
There are loads of models within the ranges to suit most pockets.

Re: Vintage steel frame bicycle for touring

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 21 August 2014 - 1:33am
Aubergine wrote:survived me very well in Kyrgyzstan, the Himalayas, Morocco etcNot sure what your boyfriend's experience qualifications are but you yourself are surely one of the most experienced world tourers hereabouts and I'd trust your own views on this!
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