Feed aggregator

Re: Any chronic whiplash sufferers here?

CTC Forum - On the road - 16 June 2014 - 9:41am
Thanks. There's obviously the issue of financing treatment that NHS won't cover. What physio I had was abandoned because I was suddenly told the pain was chronic and there was nothing more they could do for me. I protested because my improvement had been constant over the course of 6 sessions, then suddenly they stopped it. As a layman even I think there's no logic to STOP a treatment which is clearly working. I guess I'll have to keep pestering my GP until I get something.

Re: Electric 'car' fright

CTC Forum - On the road - 16 June 2014 - 9:39am
DDW wrote:Pedestrians on shared use paths have been saying that close passes by fast moving cyclists coming up from behind make them jump as long as I can remember. Maybe this will cause a little more understanding on what they have to endure.

And I suspect even more frightening/startling if not heard approaching,I always alert pedestrians of my approach especially from behind,however there are a growing number who prefer to be in a world of their own via earbuds/iPod etc.
Whilst more often than not I can attract their attention I find I have to shout louder than I like and some just don't hear my shouts(I prefer not to use a bell)I do startle these types,but short of tapping them on the shoulder or making myself hoarse I don't see an alternative .
If out walking on say a dual use tarmac path on which bikes can be almost if not totally silent,I don't think it unreasonable to expect warning of a cyclist's approach especially from behind.
I'd also expect cyclists to slow down and give as much room between themselves and me as the path allows.


On the road I'm programmed to expect the unexpected and I also use a RVM to minimise that effect.
Whilst cycling on quiet roads it's not unreasonable to expect a known(to the owner)silent electric vehicle to sound the horn 50m or so back when approaching vulnerable road users,horseriders especially could be in real danger if a silent vehicle wooshes past suddenly startling the horse they're on or even if the driver sounds the horn too close before overtaking.
TBH there's a couldn't care less attitude by some which IMO is a societal problem and not confined just to the roads,though that's where a lot of it is played out.It's might is right carelessness that does nothing for peace and harmony IMO.
My 2d's worth

Re: My Surly LHT - almost finished!

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 16 June 2014 - 8:37am
Surly are a little bit disingenuous about crushing. They know that this is a great long-distance frame and they know that long-distance cyclists usually like a kickstand, but then they advise against fitting one, if not in as many words then in their "crushable" spiel. I'd rather they specifically adapt part of the frame at the cost of a little weight than shuffle off responsibility onto the buyer, who knows a lot less about crushability than they do. There are plenty of other frames out there with such adaptations - when I bought my old Raleigh in the mid-80s I clamped on a stand with a very heavy, uneducated hand and had no problems at all.

Re: My Surly LHT - almost finished!

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 16 June 2014 - 8:06am
Weimarunner wrote:Hi Colin, yes, I have thanks.It's the side stands they advise against, I'd go for the double legged version, if I decide to fit one.

What Surly advise against is crushing the chainstays by applying a clamping load that's too big for the tubing. Seen it done. I don't understand how the number of legs will protect the tubing, but its up to you.

Re: American looking for touring partner/s in UK or just adv

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 16 June 2014 - 5:53am
If you've never been before then I see no reason not to visit stonehenge - I'd cycle to it and observe from a little distance. You won't see more from paying to visit.

As for travelling times - UK children return to school the first week of september so could lead to much quieter roads for you.

Re: American looking for touring partner/s in UK or just adv

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 16 June 2014 - 5:48am
Caravan club sites have to accept cyclists?
Is that true and has anyone out it to the test?

Re: American looking for touring partner/s in UK or just adv

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 16 June 2014 - 4:30am
Just be aware the weekend of August 23/24/25 is a public holiday. It's the last before Christmas. You may find trains are busier than normal and also accommodation.

Someone mentioned Virgin trains. In my experience this is the worst company for getting a bike on the train. Without a reservation you won't get on. That said you can make the reservation at the station minutes before travelling PROVIDED there is space available. .

Re: My Surly LHT - almost finished!

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 16 June 2014 - 1:11am
How do you fix punctures?

Re: American looking for touring partner/s in UK or just adv

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2014 - 11:59pm
Cardiff-London is more undulating than hilly, for the most part. Wikipedia has outline topography information, including the linked map, which lets you see where the main hills and plains are located.

Wales has some real mountains, but mostly west and north of Cardiff. I'd argue that, having got as far as Cardiff, you ought to loop that way to see (and climb) them. Try looking up the Brecon Beacons and the Black Mountains (as opposed to the Black Mountain).

The UK's Ordnance Survey maps are famously good. You probably want the 1:50000 series for cycling, if using paper maps.

Re: American looking for touring partner/s in UK or just adv

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2014 - 11:30pm
Thanks again to all of you who have offered such wonderful suggestions. Now that I've had more time to think about it and based of of your suggestions here is what I am thinking.

1. I want to do a large circularish route that both starts and finishes in London. I would probably take the train to the outskirts of town to avoid nasty traffic.

2. I'm thinking I will make Cardiff Wales my destination before I turn around and take a different route back. I would like to stop at Bath and Stonehenge on my way there but am seriously considering dropping Stonehenge because the general consensus seems to be it is overrated.

3. Google maps tells me it is about 190 miles from London to Cardiff via bike. I figure with a different return route (Possibly a bit further North) my total ride will be about 400-450 miles. This seems to be a practical 6 day ride although I'll only have 7 full days in the UK to spend and I want to take my time enjoying some of the sites. I also want to spend 1 full day in London (either before or after) exploring there. Is there a train from Cardiff to London. Possibly I could just tour around that area and ride back depending on how much time I have left? Is this route very hilly? I could do 80 miles a day easy if it were flat, if not I should probably reconsider riding both ways.

4. The Sustrans site seems like a great resource and I will spend some time heavily researching the best route and places to stay/camp along the way. My only concern is that even with a printed map I may very easily get lost on the back country roads. Might have to bring a GPS or just a good old fashioned compass and road map.

5. I'll be doing this the last week of August/ First week of September. When I have done a bit more research I'll post my route here. If some of you would like to join me for parts you'd be more than welcome:)


Thanks for all the kind complements about my bike across America video . I plan to do something similar on this trip. Since someone asked about my sister in the video (Kathie). I dedicated the video in her memory. That trip was one of the last times I unfortunately ever got to see her. Shortly after she died in a fire that swept through her apartment building. She was only 25. I'm glad that cycle trip gave me an opportunity to spend time with her that I otherwise would not have had.

Well thanks again everyone, happy cycling! Matt

Re: Two Abreast

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2014 - 11:13pm
68
You MUST NOT

carry a passenger unless your cycle has been built or adapted to carry one
hold onto a moving vehicle or trailer
ride in a dangerous, careless or inconsiderate manner
ride when under the influence of drink or drugs, including medicine.
Law RTA 1988 sects 24, 26, 28, 29 & 30 as amended by RTA 1991


"Inconsiderate manner" in my book.

Re: Sleeping bag or not ?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2014 - 10:36pm
Snugpak jungle bag around £35 800g and pack to grapefruit size I really like mine and has a square foot to kind of works as a duvet unzipped..

Re: Not your usual "Cyclists Dismount" sign!

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2014 - 10:23pm
thirdcrank wrote:This discussion shows why the different versions of English have been so successful: widespread use by people who were not very good at it has led to the scrapping of much of the declension of nouns and conjugation of verbs and so on. Usage rules, OK?

Someone claimed recently that the widespread use of English is in fact a misnomer and that most people speak a sort of Globlish - just enough of the right words to get them by. It's true too that language falls to a common denominator and strives for efficiency, cutting out unnecessary words and letters.

OTOH I once heard an interview on Radio 4 undertaken in India by a BBC journalist. His interviewee was a well educated, well spoken (IMV) Indian woman. I cringed as the woman ran rings around his clunky, truncated and abbreviated journalese. Her fluent ability to express concepts and arguments by using so-called correct English (in form and pronunciation) left him struggling to keep up.

Re: Learning to ride on the road with a mountain bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2014 - 9:24pm
Hi,
I would'nt know where to start, I came from an era where at seven you would be out on the street unsupervised, there were few cars then and only one at a time on the road too.
I would fear for anyone starting out on the road for the first time, luckily there are instructors posting here.

Re: My Surly LHT - almost finished!

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2014 - 9:04pm
Hi Colin, yes, I have thanks.It's the side stands they advise against, I'd go for the double legged version, if I decide to fit one.

Re: Two Abreast

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2014 - 8:38pm
kwackers wrote:
So the first thing that gets my hackles up is I'm sat at the lights and these two lycra warriors slip past my inside and stop in front of me

Cycle in London for any period of time and you get well used to this. Not just lycra warriors but Boris bikers, MTBers, Brommie riders, upstairs models with baskets, every Tom Dick and Harry does it. Then they pull slowly away because none of them know how to change down gears when stopping.

Arrgh.

Re: My Surly LHT - almost finished!

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 15 June 2014 - 8:38pm
Do read what Surly say about kickstands.

Re: Two Abreast

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2014 - 8:31pm
Erm... I had a sore knee that day. I've got a note from my mum to prove it and everything!

Re: Learning to ride on the road with a mountain bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2014 - 8:31pm
Hi 'amenahmw', welcome to the forum.

Assuming that the bike is roadworthy (brakes and gears do work, etc) , and that the bike fits you OK, then there is no reason why you shouldn't use it to learn to ride on the road.....I've taught loads of people who have had much less suitable bikes (I hate BMXs*).

If you go to a bikebility lesson then the first thing that they should teach you is how to do a safety check on the bike, however, if the bike is unsafe they will not let you use it for the session. Some instructors will do minor fixes to it, and most will top the air up in the tyres (while muttering darkly under their breath ), but don't count on it...best to take the bike to a good bike shop to get it serviced beforehand....this is your next problem: make sure that they do a report and quotes for any work that it needs before they do the work - that way you can give them the OK beforehand rather than finding you have been landed with a bill for more than the bike is worth!

Regarding speed - don't worry, in bikeability lessons it's the ones that go fast that tend to fail, whereas those that go at a modest/reasnable speed and give themselves time to think about what they are doing have a much better chance of passing. If you do want to go a bit faster then getting a pair of slick road tyres will transform the bike.

As for how difficult it is to ride in the road.....not that hard. Have a read through the High Way Code first so that you know how has priority at junctions, and understand the common road signs, etc. In bikeability your first session will probably be a L1 - this is done away from traffic and just checks that you can control the bike, stop, start, make observations, etc . Then you go for L2 which is done on quieter roads and teaches position, observation and communication, all under the care of the instructor. This gives you the basics required to ride most quieter roads. Once experienced in that you can do a L3 that takes you onto the busier and bigger stuff and is often tailored to your individual concerns.

Assuming that you can control the bike OK, then the most of the rest of it is in the mind - just getting the confidence.

Anyway, I don't know where you are, but if you are in Birmingham then send me a PM and I might be able to get you some free lessons.



* OK, OK - they are great for doing what they are meant to do...but not great fr learning road riding on.

<edit: post composed at same time as Vorpal's - not just repeating the same things for the sake of it!>

Re: Two Abreast

CTC Forum - On the road - 15 June 2014 - 8:29pm
Hi,
I don't get it you were overtaken by three cider drinking MTB'ers legless you are on 700 slicks
Syndicate content

Archive

  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

 

Terms and Conditions