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Re: Will this fit?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 October 2015 - 12:24pm
I've got city front rollers and all my camping stuff fits. Robens Caucasus 300 sleeping bag, self inflating mat, Vango pillow, silk liner plus loads of other stuff.

Re: pedal power

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 October 2015 - 11:58am
"..Carefully challenging every aspect and design of the traditional bike" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h7nullChir4 Nothing wrong with that principle; that's probably why we ride safety bikes instead of ordinaries. However I now need to lower my saddle so my knees are nearer my chin.

Re: pedal power

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 October 2015 - 11:30am
To me that article is a piece of stupid journalism, but it did prompt me to check out what it was talking about so perhaps it has succeeded.
This is the machine it's describing.
An interesting design, but I wonder if the manufacturer is concentrating on gimmicks rather than practicalities. Nothing wrong with a belt drive, but I ride a bike in long trousers and a "greasy chain" without problems. Unlike this bike I also have mudguards, which keep my clothes fairly clean. That's a very strange looking minimal spoke wheel design; is it strong enough? Is this a design by someone who has never ridden a bike? It's main feature is that it's a folding electric bike - maybe there's a market for that? But it would be absolutely useless for shopping as there aren't carrying facilities.

Re: This might appeal to the techies in the forum

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 October 2015 - 11:27am
Zimba wrote:That looks hilarious (and potentially a v.good idea) am definitely going to try this!
I've had an idea for cranks made out of very hard cheese . . .. edible bicycle ! yum.

Re: pedal power

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 October 2015 - 11:14am
I had a look at the website and it looked a neat machine - unlike the heavy monsters I often see near where I live

Re: CTC Poly Bike Bag and Easyjet Questions

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 October 2015 - 10:49am
nmnm wrote:Not Easyjey (sorry) but today I saw someone arriving at the airport for an SAS flight check-in, bike uncovered, with a BOB trailer too. Not going to end well, I supposed. But it did end well - look at this dream line from their website, puts the others to shame:

If you check in your bike without a bike carry case, turn the handlebars a quarter-turn, remove the pedals & reduce the tire pressure or deflate them entirely. We also recommend covering the chain.
Magnificent!


Wow, might have to have a Tour in Scandinavia.

Re: Taking detours on a day ride taught me about perspective

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 October 2015 - 10:40am
Hi,
The gate padlocks.

All you had to do was remove one of the cable ties and lift out the metal stop its attached to.
Then slide it all left, go through gate and replace the metal stop and on your way........................

Re: Bikes on Megabus Europe

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 October 2015 - 10:28am
foxyrider wrote:how did you pack the bike?
I'm carrying a reasonably lightweight bike bag. Not ideal but it means I can use Megabus on the way back as well.

In response to the post asking if I'm back, the answer is no. I'm catching the ferry to Tangier Med in a couple of days and will spend a couple of months touring/lazing about in Morocco. Then I'll head back very slowly, hopefully just in time for the Spring flowers

I'm about 70 miles north of Barcelona at the moment on the French coast in Banyuls-sur-Mer, spending an extra night on a campsite with the best showers in the world for 7 euros a night. It seemed rude not to stick around.

Re: This might appeal to the techies in the forum

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 October 2015 - 9:57am
That looks hilarious (and potentially a v.good idea) am definitely going to try this!

Re: Ruddy farmers

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 October 2015 - 9:47am
syklist wrote:It is a long time since I have cycled in autumn in the UK. I had forgotten about mud and thorns on the roads. Though I don't remember it being a problem when I lived in the Netherlands. There aren't many hedges in this bit of Norway and the farmers seem to be able to keep the roads mud free. Probably a bit easier here as it is hill farming territory so few crops to harvest.
Funnily enough, I've encountered mud twice recently. Last weekend, where they were harvesting cabbages, they left quite a lot of mud on the road. And this morning, near some works (I think perhaps they are laying pipe or something), the cycle path and the road nearby were both quite muddy.

I often encounter mud on road and cycle path in Lier dalen, where they grow quite a lot of produce. Road and path both occasionally get swept, but I think it's the kommune (council) who do it, not the farmers.

Re: Would left hand cars help cyclist?

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 October 2015 - 9:43am
AlaninWales wrote:syklist wrote:PDQ Mobile wrote:The biggest disadvantage of driving position on the wrong side is not being able to see well past large vehicles.
Again a case of swings and roundabouts. If you are on a long straight road with no front seat passenger (and no periscope) then yes, it is a problem. On the other hand, on a twisty road you often get a better view of the road ahead than in a car with the steering wheel on the "correct" side of the car. Big lorry, sweeping right hand bend, my RHD van, I can see along the inside (RH side in my case) of the lorry, check the road for a couple of seconds and know that it is clear to overtake. It would not be possible to see the road ahead if I were sitting in a LHD car even if I pulled out fully into the LH lane.
It would if you were correctly positioned to overtake. Try sitting a bit further back (this is one of the most common errors of drivers wanting to overtake a large, slow vehicle; sitting too close to see down the near-side on bends).

I have to agree about the ease of overtaking in a LHD. Your sight-lines open sooner on both left and right-hand corners especially where you've high hedges like Cornwall.

It really is swings and roundabouts - I've 6 cars (long story) 3 LHD and 3 RHD and I'm not bothered by either in the UK or France. The one exception are cars with poor 'over the shoulder' views like panel vans which are impossible at some junctions.

Re: Would left hand cars help cyclist?

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 October 2015 - 9:28am
syklist wrote:Again a case of swings and roundabouts. If you are on a long straight road with no front seat passenger (and no periscope) then yes, it is a problem. On the other hand, on a twisty road you often get a better view of the road ahead than in a car with the steering wheel on the "correct" side of the car. Big lorry, sweeping right hand bend, my RHD van, I can see along the inside (RH side in my case) of the lorry, check the road for a couple of seconds and know that it is clear to overtake. It would not be possible to see the road ahead if I were sitting in a LHD car even if I pulled out fully into the LH lane.

The strategy you describe can of course also be used in a "correct" side of steering wheel car.
One just needs to sit a little further back which has the additional advantage of reducing the relative size and hence blind area of the large vehicle in front.

Personally I try to leave my periscope at home!

Re: Would left hand cars help cyclist?

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 October 2015 - 9:21am
syklist wrote:PDQ Mobile wrote:The biggest disadvantage of driving position on the wrong side is not being able to see well past large vehicles.
Again a case of swings and roundabouts. If you are on a long straight road with no front seat passenger (and no periscope) then yes, it is a problem. On the other hand, on a twisty road you often get a better view of the road ahead than in a car with the steering wheel on the "correct" side of the car. Big lorry, sweeping right hand bend, my RHD van, I can see along the inside (RH side in my case) of the lorry, check the road for a couple of seconds and know that it is clear to overtake. It would not be possible to see the road ahead if I were sitting in a LHD car even if I pulled out fully into the LH lane.
It would if you were correctly positioned to overtake. Try sitting a bit further back (this is one of the most common errors of drivers wanting to overtake a large, slow vehicle; sitting too close to see down the near-side on bends).

Re: Tour de Manche

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 October 2015 - 8:36am
IanCh wrote:Can anyone tell me which are "the best bits" of the Tour de Manche...
The bit in France.

This might appeal to the techies in the forum

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 October 2015 - 8:32am
I saw this and thought it might be interesting to play with. It uses a smartphone, a free app and a home-made cardboard projector to display info such as your speed on the ground in front of your bike.

Re: pedal power

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 October 2015 - 7:49am
But this is "designed to be a tax free scooter"
So 15mph is what you'll get...

Re: Will this fit?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 October 2015 - 7:44am
bainbridge wrote:Hi tourers

Just looking at front panniers and I was wondering if an Ortleib front roller pannier will be able to accommodate a Vango Ultralite 900 sleeping bag?

According to Wiggle the panniers are 30 x 25 x 14cm. Roughly measured the compressed my bag is 39 x 20 x 20cm.

I'm inclined to say no, but do you think one might take one if it were crammed in?

The bag weighs 1.5kg so on the other side I could have the sleeping mat and waterproofs, that's a 3kg payload on the front which isn't too bad (probably about 5kg including the bags) and this'll free up some much needed space in the rear.

I've never used front panniers before and fear that buying ones that don't say 'Front pannier' will be too big for my Tubus lowrider rack and scrape the ground.

Thanks

I'm probably too late, but I've got the Ortlieb front panniers and the Vango UL 900 (from GoOutdoors) I have mine in the back pannier though as that's just my system. It will go up front but you'll have to stuff the bag in alone without the compression sack.

If you need me to physically trial it, please let me know...b

Re: Do you know how much weight you are carting about?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 October 2015 - 7:40am
bainbridge wrote:My touring has been rear panniers only so rear heavy, but it's easy enough to adapt to the front being light.
Even going uphill on rough tracks? I found it hard to keep the front end down and the bike stable in such situations. It is not a problem with front panniers + bar bag + 2 l water bag on the front end. Even when towing a trailer.
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