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Re: Rotterdam > Istanbul - Which bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 February 2015 - 11:22am
JBB wrote:I have the Edinburgh coop bike. It's a lovely ride and the gearing is good for a full load. However one of the tyres failed within days and the wheels are 32 spoke and past versions do not have a good reputation. I had no problems getting EBC to replace the tyre but swapped the wheels for a set of 36 spoke ones I had already, relegating the 32s to the hack.

I don't know the particular wheels, but I have some 32 spoke wheels that are 20 years old (they look similar, but maybe they are Rigida or something; whatever Raleigh was using on their entry level MTBs & hybrids 20 years ago). They have seen many miles of loaded touring, child carrying duties, weekly shopping, club riding, etc. I have in all that time, replaced 5 spokes. The brake surface is getting worn, and I will replace them, or at least the rims in the relatively near future.

It somewhat depends on what will be carried, but, IMO, 32 spokes is enough for many (maybe most) people doing loaded touring. It may not be enough for heavy people or a rough stuff expedition, but we're talking about a European tour. I'd have no qualms about doing the trip on 32 spoke wheels.

Re: New Dawes 26"

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 February 2015 - 11:18am
simonhill wrote:What I said was that people WANT flat bars on a bike like this.

You are all doing what has brought British industry to its knees over the last 50 years. You are telling the people what they need then providing it and then wondering why it doesn't sell!

If the hand position and access to the brakes is so important why do I see most riders on drops, not riding on the drops, not riding on the hoods, but riding on the flat tops? This always used to amuse me, people swear by drops, but looking at pictures in Cycle, most were on the tops.

I agree - I think Dawes have missed a trick by not doing a 'butterfly' bar version and axing the Tsunami (if they didn't want too many models). As for the '50 years' I couldn't agree more - it's what had me (and all the kids around me) - at the age of 12 - riding the same gearing as Eddy Merckx or falling off 'Choppers'...

Re: Good places to cycle to in Cardiff

CTC Forum - On the road - 19 February 2015 - 11:18am
brynpoeth wrote:Get a bell and ring it gently a certain distance before you reach the people. Sometims I think, one should assume all walkers are drunk or deaf or listening to loud music so they hear nothing. When the ground is clearly marked with "walker" and "cyclist" there is really no excuse.Exactly. For most pedestrians using a shared off road path, a bell will give about 8-10 seconds (about 50 yards distance at 10mph) warning of your approach.

Re: Rotterdam > Istanbul - Which bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 February 2015 - 11:07am
I have the Edinburgh coop bike. It's a lovely ride and the gearing is good for a full load. However one of the tyres failed within days and the wheels are 32 spoke and past versions do not have a good reputation. I had no problems getting EBC to replace the tyre but swapped the wheels for a set of 36 spoke ones I had already, relegating the 32s to the hack.

In your case I would see it as a choice between the Fuji and the Dawes, the main difference being whether you want bar end shifters or STI shifters integrated with the brakes.

All more food for thought!
HTH
Julia

Re: Paris to London

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 February 2015 - 11:01am
I can't advise on routes, as I have never done this trip.

But for improving, I suggest biuling up gradually. Donæt try to do a 40 mile ride, if you arenæt fit for it. Ride a little bit further each time, or get used to one distance, tehn add 5 or 10 miles at a time.

Cyling often may have more benefit, so run errands by bicycle, commute by bike, if you can; once or twice per week, even if you canæt do it everyday. If you live too far away, try mixing transport modes. Drive and cycle, or if you use the train, ride your bike to a somewhat further station.

And remember that it is more down to hours in the saddle than distance, because you will go slower on a long journey, or carrying the shopping than commuting.

Good luck and enjoy the cycling

Re: New Dawes 26"

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 February 2015 - 10:28am
pwa wrote:It is as comfy and varied as I can make straight bars and it is okay, but drops are better.
That is my experience too. I have 2 with straight bars and bar ends but find that after only 30 miles or so it is very uncomfortable for my hands and shoulders. I have 5 with drops which are comfortable for very much longer than that. I seldom use the drops but use every conceivable alternative position regularly.

However - if drops/straights/butterfly/bull horn/ape hangers work for you then keep doing it.

Wheel size - 700C for me but I tend to tour in western Europe so availability if needed is not a problem.

Re: New Dawes 26"

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 February 2015 - 10:22am
I use a 26 inch wheel VSF FahrradManufaktur T400. It is a mainstream manufactured 26 inch tourer with flat bars and is available with a number of different options for levels of equipment. Mine has a Shimano XT group set an has proved to be ultra reliable and day long comfortable. These bikes are available readiy in Europe, over the Internet and at several retailers in Britain. It is true that I can go faster on my Galaxy but I've been able to go wherever I wanted to go on the T400, or rather I haven't found anywhere I couldn't go yet.

Re: New Dawes 26"

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 February 2015 - 10:04am
With my drop bars I rarely use the drops themselves and might well have sawn them off if it were not for the fact that I use bar end shifters. Mostly my hands move around the tops of the brakes (on the hoods), but for short periods I also use the top of the straight section of the bars. But because I have changed stems to give the reach I want I find the hoods just the right distance from the saddle, and I find the straight section of the bars a little too close to me to rest on for long periods. I suspect that people with drops who spend a lot of time on the tops of the bars (i.e. close to the stem) have too long a stem and find it a bit of a stretch to the hoods.

On my Thorn tandem I have straight bars (cut short, the way I like them) with Ergon grips and long bar ends. It is as comfy and varied as I can make straight bars and it is okay, but drops are better. Butterfly bars (at least the ones I've seen) are way too wide.

Re: Cyclist defence fund Michael Mason

CTC Forum - On the road - 19 February 2015 - 9:57am
At the moment, the CDF is dealing with the possibility of a criminal prosecution, not trying to fund an action for defamation.

I see two issues. In the longer term, IMO the big issue for cyclists is whether or not it's appropriate for the police investigating a fatal collision to decide not to pass a file to the CPS for consideration / further advice etc. One important reason for this is that since a coroner's inquest can no longer decide that somebody has committed an offence, the CPS is the only review of a police decision. Nothing keeps standards up like knowing work is going to be subject to external review. I see that a member of the London Assembly has now written to the Met Commissioner to ask about this. I think this is important because he's going to have to reply, presumably either saying that this is how his force does it or he's taken steps to ensure such cases are referred to the CPS.

http://www.cyclistsdefencefund.org.uk/b ... mason-case

With that reply, the way forward should be clearer. If he says he stands by what's happened here, then steps need to be taken to change his mind. AFAIK, the judicial approach is either by applying for what used to be a writ of mandamus and is now a mandatory order, or by applying for judicial review of the decision not to submit the file. (I don't claim to be any sort of expert here.) One possibility is that when either side takes specialist legal advice, they may discover they are backing a loser. Anyway, although a court ruling would only effect this case, it would have a strong effect on anything similar in future.

There may be another way. Until recently, public complaints against the police could only be about what I'll term misconduct by the individuals concerned. They did not extend to the way a police force or the service as a whole operated. From reading a recent press release by the IPCC I gather this has changed , although I've no idea of the details. So, if the Metropolitan Police has a policy that fatal accident files don't necessarily go the CPS, then that may be open to complaint by those affected, in this case the family of the deceased.

The second issue is the possibility of a private prosecution against the driver involved if the CPS doesn't receive the file in due course, or does belatedly get the file and decides not to prosecute. There's a lot of hoops to go through, the first being that the police decision not to pursue the case was both administratively wrong and also wrong in the sense that there was sufficient evidence for a successful prosecution. I've linked before to the CPS guidance on private prosecutions and I'm pressed for time now, but in short, the CPS has a duty to look at private prosecutions with a view to taking them over. At that stage, they apply the evidence and public interest tests and, if appropriate, must discontinue the prosecution.

Re: New Dawes 26"

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 February 2015 - 9:42am
I have a bike with flats and a bike with drops. I prefer the drops. Its personal though. I would have thought though that Dawes would have done their market research and produced the bike that would sell best in its largest market (the UK). That's drops. On the continent it would have been flats. Meh.

Anyway. With the re-introduction of the ultra galaxy ti I wonder if you could get these for a much larger discount...

Re: world track champs on BBC

CTC Forum - Racing - 19 February 2015 - 9:28am
yes Red button plus there is some live coverage on BBC 2

Re: New Dawes 26"

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 February 2015 - 4:08am
I ride with hands on drop when going fast (tailwind or road with too much trafic so "i do it as a sport")
I ride with hands on the hoods mainly in the moutain,going up. This is the most enjoyable cycling.
i ride on the flat bar when going slow and relax. As in cities.

Re: New Dawes 26"

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 February 2015 - 2:37am
What I said was that people WANT flat bars on a bike like this.

You are all doing what has brought British industry to its knees over the last 50 years. You are telling the people what they need then providing it and then wondering why it doesn't sell!

If the hand position and access to the brakes is so important why do I see most riders on drops, not riding on the drops, not riding on the hoods, but riding on the flat tops? This always used to amuse me, people swear by drops, but looking at pictures in Cycle, most were on the tops.

Re: world track champs on BBC

CTC Forum - Racing - 19 February 2015 - 2:08am
TRied to watch on the UCI Youtube channel but it isn't available on UK but worked around it but no action showing. Will do the red button thing though.

Re: New Dawes 26"

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 19 February 2015 - 12:39am
This may be true if you are symetrical, I'm not so it's butterfly bars for me which have any number of options for position.
To the OP, Ridgeback have been making a 26" tourer for a while now.
World Expedition.

Re: Crane River Parks Hounslow & other London rides

CTC Forum - On the road - 19 February 2015 - 12:08am
seems like this short ride is mentioned by Sustrans as part of the national cycle network. So a worthy visit

Re: Santander to Biarritz

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 February 2015 - 11:31pm
Many thanks to all who have contributed, it's much appreciated.

Re: Is touring becoming a thing of the past?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 February 2015 - 10:44pm
22camels wrote:http://www.theguardian.com/environment/bike-blog/2015/feb/18/the-rise-of-cycle-touring-from-crazy-to-cool
Thanks for that link. "Certainly cycle tourers are mocked by the roadies, but equally MAMILs [Middle Aged Men in Lycra] are laughed at by the tourers".... so I can laugh at myself, then, depending on which of my bikes I happen to be riding But am I allowed to wear Lycra when I'm touring?? Another thread suggests itself......

Re: Is touring becoming a thing of the past?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 February 2015 - 10:37pm
I've been cycle-touring for over 30 years and my experience is that there are loads more people doing it now than there used to be. However they are doing it on a wider range of bikes, and so am I. In the late 80's I bought a nice Raleigh Touriste which I was told 'will go anywhere those new mountain bikes will!' Well, maybe. But it now has flat bars as the reach was always too long, and there are still very few touring bikes for small women (I understand SWAT06!) so what tempts me are really 'expedition' bikes. (Or maybe Brompton touring, as I try to organise yet another trip involving complicated train journeys!)

Re: Is touring becoming a thing of the past?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 18 February 2015 - 9:27pm
Interesting posts. I am obviously bucking many trends. I own a serious (and expensive) touring bike. I have done serious touring on it (London to Delhi including all the dangerous bits). I have young children (4 and 7) and am taking them on their second cycle tour in the Netherlands this summer. And yes we will camp too. Oh, and I am a woman!

Years ago when I got my first bike my husband and I did some touring but found that a hybrid was not that great for touring. We were suprised at how hard it was to find decent touring bikes in the shops. It is much easier to find them in NL. It is very difficult to find bikes suitable for a small woman anywhere. Interestingly, of the many other cycle tourists we've bumped into on our travels the biggest numbers are from the UK and NL. Our bike shops are really geared up to what is fashionable (racing or mountain biking or whatever it is). I think Dutch shops are different. Probably because there are more of them, and perhaps also there are fewer chains.
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