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Re: Touring bike alternatives?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 September 2014 - 10:03am
I went to Morroco and spain on a Rockhopper, with a couple of panniers on the back...that was eighteen years ago...It was a very good bike...

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 September 2014 - 9:18am
I think Swallow may have stumbled across the answer to proper medical support on club runs in this thread .

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 September 2014 - 9:09am
I am not a medic, but have been First aid trained and trained to use a defib. This is what I have learned.
The best chances of surviving a heart attack are early CPR, early Defib, early clot busting drugs and early to hospital.
CPR will not restart someones heart (except in Hollywood). It will give you time to get a defib. A defib will only work if it senses the right conditions, namely that the heart is fibrilating, The electrical impulses in the heart go all screwy and the heart muscle is twitching, rather than beating. The defib defibrulates the heart, meaning that it sends an electric shock to stop the heart twitching, then it can beat properly again.
If the heart is stopped and it is not fibrilating, the machine will not do anything, the person is dead.

Whether to carry one is another matter, I guess you would have to weigh up the probabilities of it happening.
A ride with a fit and health group, with no known medical problems, probably not. A ride with the heart attack survivors cycling club, probably.

Neil

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 September 2014 - 9:01am
I would suggest that we're not there yet in general though.

There may be specific groups who consider it, but in general they are still too expensive, and of such rare use that it's not a sane trade off.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 September 2014 - 8:34am
Tonyf33 wrote:Again, similarly to the carrying additional tags etc on a helmet in case you die at the side of the road in the wilderness, what are the chances of someone having a heart attack or stop breathing whilst on a cycle ride, less than those banging their heads and having life threatening injuries.
To even consider taking a defib around is just a nonsense IMO, sorry but it's all getting a bit stupid..why not have your own ambulance following the group rides just to make sure it'll save 'just one life'.. in fact, better yet, whilst you walk down to the shops or up the stairs to bed

It was once considered impossible to have a pocket communicator device that could connect you to emergency services almost anywhere in the country but we now take mobile phones for granted. Technology changes things and what was once unthinkable sometimes needs to be reconsidered.

I'm not seriously suggesting this is likely to take off in a big way yet but the day may come when NOT carrying a cheap lightweight defibrillator to an organised group activity (often frequented by old folk with heart disease) will be considered irresponsible.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 September 2014 - 8:33am
661-Pete wrote: Also I have no idea whether anyone was specifically trained on how or when to use the defib. There are first-aiders, who've done the standard training with St Johns Ambulance, would they have the know-how?



My 1st aid course: "1st aid in the workplace(sports)", was very defib heavy with the chap at one point intimating that if you've not got access to a defib then you've only got around a 5% chance of saving them. But there again he also said that the plastic that household electrical plug bodies are made from would conduct electricity!

anyhoo, with the U lock, first aid kit, a toolkit to fit most bikes, spares, and all my paperwork, etc etc there is no way I've got the room or the legs to tote another 2kg around!

Re: Tiernan-Locke banned.

CTC Forum - Racing - 1 September 2014 - 8:31am
Been away from computer access for a week, but before I went, local paper again, UKAD accept the drink (alcohol) for the raised levels, they don't accept that he wouldn't have drunk a load of water to rehydrate, he says he didn't for fear of throwing up in front of new team mates. Endura Racing stand by him, and EPO was beyond his financial means. The paper is the Hearald Express (Torbay), page 61, 21/8/14.
Cheers, Rob.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 September 2014 - 8:28am
Psamathe wrote:eileithyia wrote:Best to be aware that most shopping centres / town centre have a debrillator and hope you not too much in the middle of nowhere... but there is only so much you can do.
Am I right in thinking that the emergency services can direct you to the nearest one ? 'cos whilst there might be one in the nearby shopping mall, things might have developed by the time you've been round all the shops asking all the weekend staff who have to check ...

Ian

Not a lot a help during our average club rides out in the sticks! Might be useful for more urban folk.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 September 2014 - 8:26am
eileithyia wrote:Defribillator only of any use in an arrest and then only for certain heart arythmias, the device talks through whether it is shockable or unshockable rhythm.

Better to know how to do effective CPR, 30:2ratio always more effective to do chest compressions adequate than ineffective breathing.. there is always some O2 in the blood and it is better to keep it circulating.

When I saw someone collapse at a cycle event, it was a cylinder of 02 I needed not a debrillator and would have been far more effective than a defribillator... I seriously do not think anyone would allow me to carry 02 around with me.. nor would I want the weight.

Best to be aware that most shopping centres / town centre have a debrillator and hope you not too much in the middle of nowhere... but there is only so much you can do.

Sorry but I disagree.

CPR and defibrillators do different jobs. CPR primarily supports the circulation whilst defibrillators primarily restore rhythm. There's a place for both and neither negates the usefulness of the other. It is wrong to say that it is "better" to know effective CPR. If our friend had gone into cardiac arrest, his chances of survival would have been greatly increased by the availability of a defibrillator even in the presence of effective CPR.

Now I know you can't really prepare for all eventualities, but given how the weight of defibrillators have dropped so much and how they've become automated, perhaps it's not too unreasonable to consider carrying one at physical group activities undertaken by not so young folk?

Just a thought.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 September 2014 - 8:25am
Again, similarly to the carrying additional tags etc on a helmet in case you die at the side of the road in the wilderness, what are the chances of someone having a heart attack or stop breathing whilst on a cycle ride, less than those banging their heads and having life threatening injuries.
To even consider taking a defib around is just a nonsense IMO, sorry but it's all getting a bit stupid..why not have your own ambulance following the group rides just to make sure it'll save 'just one life'.. in fact, better yet, whilst you walk down to the shops or up the stairs to bed

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 September 2014 - 8:21am
At my workplace, the jobsworth of an H&S manager deemed that we had to have a defibrillator on the premises, notwithstanding that no-one among the workforce was believed to be at imminent risk of a cardiac arrest (or so I hope!). In his wisdom he decided that the best place to lodge this piece of kit was in the canteen, in one of the cupboards. This evinced many moans from the rest of us, since we were not allowed to put our cups etc. in the same cupboard, and there was a shortage of space already. Also I have no idea whether anyone was specifically trained on how or when to use the defib. There are first-aiders, who've done the standard training with St Johns Ambulance, would they have the know-how?

It seems to me, that taking eileithyia on the payroll with her expertise, would have been far more effective than any number of defibs!

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 September 2014 - 8:18am
eileithyia wrote:Best to be aware that most shopping centres / town centre have a debrillator and hope you not too much in the middle of nowhere... but there is only so much you can do.
Am I right in thinking that the emergency services can direct you to the nearest one ? 'cos whilst there might be one in the nearby shopping mall, things might have developed by the time you've been round all the shops asking all the weekend staff who have to check ...

Ian

Re: Lon Las Cymru on starting on Sat 6.9.14, campsite sugges

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 September 2014 - 7:46am
On the dates that you have chosen, I would start up in the North.

There will be 9,500 police (many of them toting guns) enforcing large exclusion zones in Cardiff and Newport, odds on they will block stretches of the NCN route as cyclists are even more insignificant than the rest of the general population.

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales ... rs-7697281

I would hate your memories of Wales to be this disgusting image as a Police state, dancing to the tune of the USA security mania.

Slightly off route, this place was super cheap (£3 for cycle camper and £18 for B&B just five years ago).

http://www.ukcampsite.co.uk/sites/revie ... revid=4409

There is lots in the forum on this subject but unfortunately the key words are only 3 letters long and the search function is used to four letter words.

Re: Carrying a defibrillator

CTC Forum - On the road - 1 September 2014 - 6:55am
Defribillator only of any use in an arrest and then only for certain heart arythmias, the device talks through whether it is shockable or unshockable rhythm.

Better to know how to do effective CPR, 30:2ratio always more effective to do chest compressions adequate than ineffective breathing.. there is always some O2 in the blood and it is better to keep it circulating.

When I saw someone collapse at a cycle event, it was a cylinder of 02 I needed not a debrillator and would have been far more effective than a defribillator... I seriously do not think anyone would allow me to carry 02 around with me.. nor would I want the weight.

Best to be aware that most shopping centres / town centre have a debrillator and hope you not too much in the middle of nowhere... but there is only so much you can do.

Re: Touring bike alternatives?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 September 2014 - 6:53am
Pete Jack wrote:I find 'dillos overrated; they are heavy, have a harsh ride and the last one I used got a flat in under 200 miles
I've opined before that I think 'dillos changed some time 2010-2012, becoming stickier and so picking up debris long enough to get hammered into the tyre.

Re: Touring Iceland

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 September 2014 - 6:47am
heatonrider wrote:Hi - 4 of us toured Iceland last year and can offer some pretty comprehensive and up to date info:

Photos - if you want to see the slide show of our trip here is the link - there are some maps of where we went included (I did it for my cycling club)
https://picasaweb.google.com/1171190117 ... 6_LS7bzXAQ



Brilliant! Thanks for the link.

Re: Touring bike alternatives?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 1 September 2014 - 4:27am
Neil C wrote:I was too tight to pay the extra for the Armadillos but not regretting it yet!
I find 'dillos overrated; they are heavy, have a harsh ride and the last one I used got a flat in under 200 miles. I've been using Panasonic Ribmos lately and like 'em; they are light, stick to the road and wear well my back one has about 6000 on it, with 2 flats since new (one I think was a bad tube)

If you're still thinking of bikes, there's a disc version of the Trek 520 out now, looks sweet,I've got 45,000 on mine and love it. The original Vee brakes were crap and I replaced the front one with a Single Digit Ultimate which is much better (and much more expensive), the original SD-5 is adequate for the back.

I once met a man in Virginia who had rode a Schwinn that he had found in a ditch from Los Angeles a distance of about 2500 miles, his bike was utter rubbish but it goes to show you can tour on about anything.

Re: Solo night ride

CTC Forum - On the road - 31 August 2014 - 11:47pm
Some roads that have streetlights might not have streetlights once the clock strikes twelve. Several local councils turn the streetlights after midnight to save money. I found out the hard way a road on my short commute home was under this rule when finishing work one night last Christmas at midnight, rode the 1.5 miles of country lane with lights on full power and was expecting to turn them down when I got to the main road but still needed full power for another mile.

Re: Best Ortlieb Rear Panniers for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 31 August 2014 - 11:43pm
OnYourRight wrote:PH: you say 30 litres, but the Ortlieb website says the Front-Roller Classic panniers have a capacity of 25 litres per pair. Are yours a little bigger?

What saddlebag do you use? I’m interested in this idea – small front panniers at the back combined (only when needed) with my Carradice Lowsaddle Longflap saddlebag – but I wonder how they’d work together. I’d probably favour the Front-Roller City panniers, since they’re cheaper and simpler, but I’m wondering if 25 litres is really enough. It seems to me like it would be, but nearly everyone uses something bigger.

25 - 30 litres, you could be right, though it varies depending how tight you roll down the top.
I use the panniers
Nelson Longflap, only needing the extra flap if I've overdone the shopping
8L Vaude barbag
Tent is outside the bags

That's plenty for me, though I don't do much cooking and wear clothes on the bike that I'm also comfy in off. I'm a 3 season camper, I'd want a lot of extra kit for winters.

Re: Solo night ride

CTC Forum - On the road - 31 August 2014 - 11:39pm
Mick F wrote: Also, in pitch dark, you can't keep an eye on which gear you are in!
And that is one way that any lever shifter is better than indexed trigger shifters or brifters

From some shorter night rides, my top tips would be get dynamo lights, take spare good AA or AAA battery lights as backup or to spotlight repairs and use red reflective tape to make most of the mudguard and seat post backs into extra reflectors.
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