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Re: Is this level of insanity commonplace?

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 June 2014 - 6:08am
BeeKeeper wrote:Just illustrates why we need a law prescribing how a bicycle should be overtaken, as they do in France and Spain. 1.5m gap minimum on the open road and they must indicate. On the spot fine for not doing it.

Would it change anything? Not overnight but they would have to learn it for their driving licence.

It wouldn't change anything because, as with ASLs and driving on the phone, there would be no-one to enforce it.

In the OP's position I would take primary after the first attempt to make them overtake me rather than try to pass.

Re: Dover to London for family

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 June 2014 - 1:57am
TT,

Off topic - but save your money and avoid Madame Tassaude's. It is basically a horrible tourist trap. The kids and I failed to recognize most of the 'celebrities'. Whether this was due to our avoidance of trash TV and the tabloid press or the poor quality of the wax works I don't know

Re: Thames path

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 June 2014 - 1:13am
The upper reaches are almost all footpath only - i.e. no bikes.

That said, I had a lovely ride a few years back along lanes from Lechlade to Oxford - and yes, you can go through the river at Duxford, as long as it's not in spate: http://cycle.travel/map/journey/7583



From Oxford to Wallingford, you can follow NCN 5.

From Wallingford to Reading, I've long been tempted to do this, but haven't tried it yet: http://cycle.travel/map/journey/7584



And downstream of Reading you can follow NCN 4 all the way.

Re: Is this level of insanity commonplace?

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 June 2014 - 12:00am
drossall wrote:.........To me, it would help as above if drivers had cycling experience, but it's this understanding of what is going on that is fundamental. I'm not sure that this kind of "driving theory" is taught.

Going off the number of close overtakes I get from motoring school cars I don't think it's even considered by some instructors let alone taught.

In answer to the OP,yes the level of insanity is commonplace,only yesterday I had the same overtaking manoeuvre,the driver overtaking gave me plenty of space,but caused the oncoming driver
to ES.
It happens regularly when I'm cycling

Re: St Malo to Caen routes and places to stay

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 June 2014 - 11:50pm
LukePedal wrote:We are having our first cycling venture to northern France in May and would appreciate any advice on routes between St Malo and Caen ports. We will be doing this over 5 days and any advice would be great. We would preferably stay in hostels or any good low cost accommodation. Many Thanks Luke

Luke

I am really keen to know how you got on as we have a similar plan. We are taking our 3 boys (17, 14 and 12) on their first ever tour in the Summer, this will be our first tour for just over 20 years. We are planning to travel from Portsmouth into/out of St Malo to/from Caen. We will stay in Hostels/B&B. Happy to phone you if it is easier.

John

Re: Thrown into cycle commuting - not by choice!

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 June 2014 - 11:26pm
Decathlon Triban 3. Or. Halfords Subway which carries loads.

Al

Re: Is this level of insanity commonplace?

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 June 2014 - 11:09pm
That's a widely-held view.

The fundamental point is that overtaking a bike is no different from overtaking anything else, because the bike is a vehicle in front of you, in the (one and only) traffic lane. Bike lanes have their place, but confuse things here because, mentally, people seem to imagine that all bikes are in some kind of bike lane, even when none is painted on the road. No such lane exists - as above, the bike is in the "car lane", because it's just a traffic lane, and bikes are traffic.

Any car passing it is moving out of the main vehicle lane to overtake (because there cannot be two vehicles, side by side, both in the main traffic lane at the same point).

To me, it would help as above if drivers had cycling experience, but it's this understanding of what is going on that is fundamental. I'm not sure that this kind of "driving theory" is taught.

Re: Thrown into cycle commuting - not by choice!

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 June 2014 - 10:45pm
Dave, you've come to a cycling website for advice, and, unsurprisingly, most people are offering you a bike-related solution. But seriously, I think you might need a car, and with the £400+ that people are trying to spend for you, you can get a reasonable internal combustion powered workhorse...no one wants to be seen in the Arkansas Chuggabug anymore. Why do I say this? Well, trying to sleep after cycling is difficult for an hour or two, so if you are shift working, I think you might be struggling to ever nod off. You've got a family, and they will make demands on you that you might not be able to fulfil with just a bike, and they will get annoyed. You also need a steely mindset or a cycling addiction to cycle out in hills every single day in all weathers, and you probably haven't developed this, yet. You also need quite a bit of gear for being out in all weathers.
Having a car will mean that you can keep using the Schwinn beach cruiser for now, and either cycle both ways a few days a week, or cycle one way, leaving the car alternately at home or work. You'll still be getting fit. Eventually, someone might even give you a nice bike, or loan you one....there are loads of unused or underused ones in sheds and garages, or you can save for a pedelec. [I can't believe the price of that Elf you linked to!]

Re: Thames path

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 June 2014 - 10:40pm
2008 Survey for a Thames Estuary foot/cycle path: http://www.thamesweb.com/component/docm ... ?Itemid=61

It covers both banks from the Thames Barrier heading east.

Re: Best/favourite snacks for on the bike

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 June 2014 - 10:23pm
I've never been able to eat a full English breakfast. At home I always have grapefruit juice, unsweetened muesli with added oatflakes and plain yoghurt, homemade wholemeal toast, and coffee. More than that and I feel very uncomfortable. On tour in B&Bs I make do with juice, muesli and/or weetabix, plain croissant (no butter) or toast, and coffee.

Instead I try and eat a lot for my evening meal, adding flapjacks and/or tinned rice pudding as I feel like. With the above breakfast plus nibbles through the day (even when I don't feel hungry) I can keep up 60 - 70 mpd, at a touring / enjoy the view / smell the flowers pace.

Re: Thrown into cycle commuting - not by choice!

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 June 2014 - 10:14pm
My own (limited) experience:
When I took-up cycling again, I was using an old rubbish MTB just to check I was going to do enough cycling to make it worth getting a better bike. Had knobbly tyres and I was not used to cycling. And I used to think that maybe one day I might be able to ride to local town to do shopping.

Then I got a better bike (with "touring tyres") and soon the idea of a ride to the local town is trivial and I extend the ride a lot further.

So, stick with it. It should save you loads of money, helps you get much fitter, burns through calories, etc. So many benefits.

Ian

Re: Lyon to the Alps - September 2014

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 3 June 2014 - 10:11pm
Hello guys,

Thanks for the tips, I found the Via Rhone website useful - not heard of that bike route before.

Re: Is this level of insanity commonplace?

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 June 2014 - 10:10pm
When out for a ride the other day, a couple were cycling same road opposite direction, girl in front, bloke short distance behind and it struck me that bloke probably had the safer position as I could imagine a car pulling out with visibility to overtake/pass the 1st bike maybe without driver even registering there was a 2nd bike ahead. And then when oncoming vehicle spotted, overtaking car has to pull-in and only then notices there was a 2nd bike (hopefully notices).

Also, if driver on "autopilot" overtakes 1st bike and pulls-in without thinking or looking close enough to register 2nd bike.

Just struck me that the 2 bikes in single file was putting leading bike at bigger risk.

Ian

Re: Thrown into cycle commuting - not by choice!

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 June 2014 - 9:48pm
Dave Mania wrote:TonyR wrote:You could try Sunrise Cycle near West Pier who rent out and sell second hand bikes (opening times are a bit hit and miss). Rent a reasonable road bike for a day and give it a try to see if it works for you and if you like it you could always buy it off him.

Ooh - thanks for that pointer, I think I noticed that place the other day on my way past. I definitely need a test ride on a road bike before throwing some money that way.

Vantage wrote:Bigger tyres as said will roll just as easily as narrow ones but allow for potholes, comfort and more adventurous detours should you get bored with the usual route.
A rear rack and panniers will take whatever luggage you carry off your back and bum.
Mudguards. You won't regret them. Ever.

Have swapped out the knobbly tyres for the original, rather snazzy whitewalls and retro mudguards... Urgently as it's supposed to be chucking it down tomorrow.

The front wheel on this bike has a nice dynamo hub which I'll certainly miss on a different machine.
you might be able to take it with you... or at let get a relatively cheap replacement...

Re: Is this level of insanity commonplace?

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 June 2014 - 9:45pm
I think you're right actually...
'Scuse me while I wander off to get the oil and tyre levers to remove said foot from said mouth...

Re: Is this level of insanity commonplace?

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 June 2014 - 9:45pm
i was overtaken on a blind bend by a ambulance,sirens sounding;i think he misjudged his distances,and was unable to stop to pull in behind me;consequently he had to pass into a blind bend;thankfully the road into and beyond the bend was clear.

Re: Thrown into cycle commuting - not by choice!

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 June 2014 - 9:42pm
TonyR wrote:You could try Sunrise Cycle near West Pier who rent out and sell second hand bikes (opening times are a bit hit and miss). Rent a reasonable road bike for a day and give it a try to see if it works for you and if you like it you could always buy it off him.

Ooh - thanks for that pointer, I think I noticed that place the other day on my way past. I definitely need a test ride on a road bike before throwing some money that way.

Vantage wrote:Bigger tyres as said will roll just as easily as narrow ones but allow for potholes, comfort and more adventurous detours should you get bored with the usual route.
A rear rack and panniers will take whatever luggage you carry off your back and bum.
Mudguards. You won't regret them. Ever.

Have swapped out the knobbly tyres for the original, rather snazzy whitewalls and retro mudguards... Urgently as it's supposed to be chucking it down tomorrow.

The front wheel on this bike has a nice dynamo hub which I'll certainly miss on a different machine.

Re: Thrown into cycle commuting - not by choice!

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 June 2014 - 9:41pm
Dave Mania wrote:I need to make this easier as I'm only a week in and I'm running out of energy!

Long commute, against headwinds, unsocial hours, inappropriate bike - you really are thrown in at the deep end. Congratulations on managing a week of it. Hat's off to you sir.

I would second all the advice to get a ±£400 road bike, either the Felt linked above or nice used one. I recently went from my mountain bike (with slick tyres) to a 1980s steel frame road bike with modern wheels, components and skinny tyres; I can't believe the difference, it is like a rocket compared to the MTB.

Don't despair. A new road bike will be a transformation. Then your fitness and stamina will improve. Pretty soon it will become a pleasure and not only will you be saving money but your general health will benefit hugely.

Stick with it.

Re: Thrown into cycle commuting - not by choice!

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 June 2014 - 9:41pm
Dave Mania wrote:I need to make this easier as I'm only a week in and I'm running out of energy!

Long commute, against headwinds, unsocial hours, inappropriate bike - you really are thrown in at the deep end. Congratulations on managing a week of it. Hat's off to you sir.

I would second all the advice to get a ±£400 road bike, either the Felt linked above or nice used one. I recently went from my mountain bike (with slick tyres) to a 1980s steel frame road bike with modern wheels, components and skinny tyres; I can't believe the difference, it is like a rocket compared to the MTB.

Don't despair. A new road bike will be a transformation. Then your fitness and stamina will improve. Pretty soon it will become a pleasure and not only will you be saving money but your general health will benefit hugely.

Stick with it.

Re: Is this level of insanity commonplace?

CTC Forum - On the road - 3 June 2014 - 9:39pm
Vantage wrote:maff1977 wrote:there is hope - the oil's running out.

Erm....what do you put on your chain then?
I think most chain lubricants are synthetic
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