Feed aggregator

Re: A worrying state of affairs

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 12:52pm
PH, yup, do understand about presumed liability. Just so sad at this sort of story still happening, clutching at straws!

Re: Cats eyes...

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 12:52pm
I think the Americans prefer reflective road marking paint (I think they think its longer lasting, though that seems unexpected to me).

Again I would limit its use to just enough warning before corners, to leave a reminder to the errant driver to stay within their visible illuminated range.

Re: Cats eyes...

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 12:03pm
As someone who is involved with applying technology to solve problems I think electronic catseyes may have some positive attributes but on the whole I'm an advocate of the age old design that has evolved to be one of the best pieces of road furniture. The principle of them filling with rain water and having the rubber moulding act to clean the two glass lenses when driving over is excellent. As long as councils/highways agencies keep on top of checking for dislodged/damaged ones ( they last a very long time ) then I feel they are an optimal product and much less resource intensive than the electronic items and their disposal requirements as previous poster points to.

Simply a good design thats hard to better. The carriageway lane indicators ( reflectives ) on motorways seem to work well too. The only negative of catseyes from a cycling perspective is being careful if you should cycle over one, as sometimes happens when going through roadworks with closed off lanes and being pushed by the impatient car behind .

PS: sorry just posted after connection problems and saw the criticism of riding over catseyes.... but clearly I'm not alone.

Re: Cats eyes...

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 12:01pm
catseys are a wonderful (British) invention - if u are so daft as to ride over them then expect the worst! dont know why the need to replace the reflective kind as the old type work well enough? and have no circuitry to get damaged by buffeting? The reflective ones work beyond the range of my m/c beam and it is almost magical to see the road outlined ahead. if the rest of the world don't use them its their loss!

"They cost £30 and last for between eight and 10 years. By contrast cats eyes cost around £10 and last for between two and three years before they need replacing"

hmm that sounds like sales talk? why do the reflective type need replacing every 3 years? I bet due to road bufffeting, in which case the led type will be very expensive as the same will apply to them!

Re: Dazzling motorists

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 11:49am
But properly dipped car headlamps have the cutoff dipped downwards by more than a degree and a bit from horizontal, so doesn't that limit the range to less than the official braking distance for 40mph (120ft)?

Re: How daft is this?!!

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 11:48am
Signs equivalent to that are common in France. But in general, roads in France are wider, and cycle lanes are fewer except in the big cities (which I avoid).

Re: Cats eyes...

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 11:45am
I'd do away with them thanks, detest the things. Not the reflective nature of them of course, but the fact that the metal/rubber studs can be a hazard to cyclists. I've never come off through hitting a catseye, but I've had some close calls.

Moreover, they are rarely if at all seen in other parts of the world, and I don't have a problem if they're not there. Do they make Britain's roads any safer? I'm a bit bothered by this remark:"It is much less stressful driving when the road studs are used because drivers can see further ahead."See the catseyes further ahead, yes - but does that guarantee that they can also see the cyclist further ahead? Or, worse still, the pedestrian (who's far less likely to be carrying a light).

Re: Cats eyes...

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 11:40am
And surely overuse of any form of cats eyes is a safety minus:

IMO they encourage people to drive faster than the range of their headlamps allows, thus endangering pedestrians and anyone whose rear lamp(s) has failed etc etc...


Perhaps they should be limited to corners, giving warning but just enough of a scare to discourage people from exceeding the range of their illumination?

But I think we should stick to passive ones for simplicity and reliability and to avoid cluttering roads with electronic junk (WEEE).

Re: How daft is this?!!

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 11:39am
It looks like the cars are SUPPOSED to park on the pavement!
Screen Shot 2015-11-22 at 11.38.09.png

Re: How daft is this?!!

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 11:32am
I know the area, but my knowledge won't be much help I'm afraid because most of it dates from the 1950s and 60s. In more recent years Croydon is merely a place to pass through, as quickly as possible...

It's time this political obsession with 'meeting targets' were done away with for good. Some years ago, amid great fanfare (ribbon-cutting and all) a new cycle path was created in our area, linking the neighbouring towns of Burgess Hill and Hassocks. Although a tad better than the Croydon example (at least it's a segregated path, albeit it weaves around trees and private entrances), I've seen very few cyclists - or pedestrians - using it. But no doubt a target was met - and that's what mattered!

Re: How daft is this?!!

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 10:26am
This maybe a residential street, as is just about every street from Croydon to central London, but it is the B266 and the nearby A212 is similar, but with worn out road markings. Parking on pavements is not allowed within the GLC, unlike everywhere else in the UK, unless signs permit. This is the case here; the two signs are adjacent to indicate where it is and isn't allowed. Along the road where it isn't and there's a noticeable difference.

The local authority appears to be the London Borough of Croydon.

The pavement is also partially blocked, and I think people on mobility scooters, and with push chairs etc would have difficulty using it.
It seems even main thoroughfares can't be kept clear of the clutter of parked vehicles; they are blocking not just the cycle lane, but the pavement as well!

Anyone know this area?

Re: Mountain bike for 14 yr old

CTC Forum - MTB - 22 November 2015 - 10:16am
as ever shop around, the shops are full of mtbs. Go for the right size - by which I mean one he can ride without problems but still has plenty of growing room. A lot of kids his age are on adult-sized bikes, It could last a good nwhile, so its worth getting a decent one (and a good lock). My preference is for the one with the strongest wheels, they will get a hard time. All mountain bikes have strong frames, loads of gears, powerful brakes etc.

Re: How daft is this?!!

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 10:12am
MikeF wrote:I don't live here (although Croydon isn't that far away) but I was looking at Streetview to see what conditions might be like cycling in "outer" London. I came across this. A cycle lane has been clearly marked out on the road, but vehicles are allowed to park partially on the pavement. They not only block the cycle lane making it irrelevant, but also make it extremely difficult for pedestrians! The problem is we're getting to the stage where we have more motor vehicles than room to put them!
I posted on this some time ago. I think it was the consequence of the Fat Controller's edict about councils having to produce a certain length of cycle path, without any stipulation about quality, connectivity and suitability. The local authorities just put in lengths of "cycle path" to make up the required distance.

Re: Wivenhoe to Essex University Cycle Path

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 9:53am
nez dans le guidon wrote:No I belong to ctc but work away from home a lot so ride alone. You'll spot me okay - big fellow on a Specialized Roubaix. I try to go round at least once a week, more often twice. Rain or shine but not on windy days.
You wouldn't have enjoyed it last Weds then! I was intending to go to Dovercourt, while I was out an already strong wind got worse and I struggled back into it from Wix. as you know there's not much shelter between Mistley and Bromley as the hedges have been taken out, I was on the small ring flogging my guts out to do 9mph! A bit dangerous really in the gusts so I was glad to get home.

Re: Cats eyes...

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 9:51am
You mean to test the alertness of a driver after doing his or her eight hour shift at work? I'd rather stick with the reflectives, thanks.

Re: How daft is this?!!

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 9:49am
The only reason for marking a cycle lane there is to narrow the road when vehicles aren't parked. It has no use as a cycle lane; it's too narrow.

Re: How daft is this?!!

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 November 2015 - 9:48am
I wonder if that street was right for cycle lanes in the first place. It is clearly a residential street where most homes have one or more cars and on-street parking is required. There is no room for a separate channel for cycling. It's a waste of paint really.

Re: Steed Advice: 2017 California to Maine

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 November 2015 - 9:23am
CafeSprinter wrote:Ran across this beauty. My only concern is that it's a 2x10. I'm used to keeping three up front, and while I wouldn't mind switching for road riding, the US can be a pretty hilly place so I worry that I might get stuck in the Rockys.

http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/ ... lite#specs
I don't think having 2 X 10 is a problem, but the lowest gear might be. That's somewhat higher geared than I would want for loaded touring, though there are folks around who would tour comfortably on that.

The lowest gear on the Elite is 27 gear inches. The lowest gear on the similar (but more expensive) Evo is 24.4 gear inches, which falls better into the range of gearing for touring. Though, I have to admit that if I were planning a tour that included the Rockies, I would look for something with a bottom gear of closer to 21 gear inches, not everyone finds that necessary. It also somewhat depends on what you carry and what you are used to.

You can compare gearing using one of the online gear calculators. I usually use Sheldon Brown's http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gears/

On the other hand, if you do get something that is geared too high, the worst that happens is you walk up some hills.

Re: Steed Advice: 2017 California to Maine

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 November 2015 - 9:08am
CafeSprinter wrote:Ran across this beauty. My only concern is that it's a 2x10. I'm used to keeping three up front, and while I wouldn't mind switching for road riding, the US can be a pretty hilly place so I worry that I might get stuck in the Rockys.

http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/ ... lite#specs
How do you get stuck? You just get off and push.

Re: Mountain bike for 14 yr old

CTC Forum - MTB - 22 November 2015 - 8:33am
Went to Sherlock Pines and picked up an ex-rental Felt 7seventy for £250.
Syndicate content

About

CTC

Archive

  • Patron: Her Majesty The Queen
  • President: Jon Snow
  • Chief Executive: Paul Tuohy
  • Cyclists' Touring Club (CTC): A company limited by guarantee, registered in England no.25185. Registered as a charity in England and Wales No 1147607 and in Scotland No SC042541

Copyright © CTC 2015

Terms and Conditions