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Re: Winter cycling boots

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 11:56am
I've started this winter with a pair of Specialized Defroster boots - so far so good, dry and reasonably warm feet with summer socks. when weather gets here i'll use thicker socks of course.

Re: What should I do if a car keep on driving up my ***

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 11:56am
Have you tried using one of the modern very bright rear lights? I get a lot more respect from car drivers now I have modern very bright lights.

Re: Finding and using a "rat bike" for commuting

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 11:38am
Tonyf33 wrote:NEW 27" wheels are widely available to be delivered to your door for around £20-25 (incl postage)
With suitable hubs to old-fashioned narrow fork spacings? Please tell me who is selling those.

Many 27" wheel sellers are very reluctant to disclose the hub width, and when they do all I can find are modern hub widths. As an example, this amazon listing refuses to disclose the hub width and says "all you have to do is cold set the fork" - I've never found a cycle repairer willing to do that, it's that easy, not. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Wilkinson-Alloy ... B00N3K2T7G I have foolishly bought 27" wheels off ebay that said "fits old bicycles" but they don't. I have had to throw them away because there are few old bicycles that take such wide hubs.

Zuiderzee route LF 20, 21, 22 Netherlands.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 November 2015 - 11:20am


We are looking forward to our next family holiday (photo from last time) and are keen to know recommended visits/don't visits, good campsites, clever ideas etc. The juniors will be 10 and 12 (bikes upgraded already).

Silicon for my Tent

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 November 2015 - 11:03am
Hi,
As subject, really. My tent is about four years old now and although in tip-top shape as I'm careful, I reckon a coating of silicon wouldn't go astray. Thing is, I've no idea where to get this in the UK. Can anyone help ?

Thanks.

Re: Finding and using a "rat bike" for commuting

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 10:40am
iviehoff wrote:Another thing to watch out for is 27" wheels. Anything pre about 1987/88-ish will have 27" wheels. You can get 27" tyres, but you have reduced choice, may pay extra, and probably have to get it mail order. Main problem arises when the wheel itself needs replacing, as sourcing 27" wheels that will fit at proportionate cost is more of a nuisance. The real problem is not so much the rim size but that they will have narrower spacings between the forks than modern bikes. Now you can pay a wheelbuilder to get 27" wheels build on slim hubs, probably your recovered hubs, but you'll pay more for the wheels than the bike. You can force somewhat wider hubs in - it's what I do - but it takes practice to achieve it without much swearing, and makes removing the wheel for whatever purpose, be it fixing a puncture or other maintenance requirements, very annoying for the difficulty of getting it back in. Sometimes you can put a 700C in instead, but you need to check the adjustment on the brakes. I've been able to put a 700C front wheel on my "gem" but the rear has to be 27" - probably the bike will be written off when the wheel fails. For these reasons, you will find that the price difference between 1990 and 1985 bikes on ebay is really quite substantial.

I think you're massively overcomplicating matters, for starters NEW 27" wheels are widely available to be delivered to your door for around £20-25 (incl postage) and 27" tyres of decent quality can still be purchased readily (conti ultra sport are £13 each). However given the cost of replacement for a wheel you might as well just buy another whole bike and use it for spares or just replace it altogether.

Re: Finding and using a "rat bike" for commuting

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 10:36am
Almost any bike will do, IMO. Older, reasonable quality bikes, that are not big brands are good because tea leaves often don't recognise them as easy to sell. The main thing is to have components on it that are reliable and not too flash. The mix n' match look is useful, if you can achieve that. If the bike itself looks too nice, this can easily be fixed with a bit of spray paint. Flat black or grey primer are nicely off-putting, although multi-colour is a nicer alternative. Put it on in spots, like you've cleaned up and repaired some rust (taking a bit of steel wool to the surface first will enhance this effect). Leaving some drips or runs, is nice, too. If you've got anything that still looks too good (e.g. 531 sticker) wrap some gaffer tape round it, prefereably in a colour that clashes with the rest of the bike.

If you're feeling creative, personalize it with drawings in permanent marker & varied colours, knitted or crocheted accessories, papier mache or something else to make it unusual.

Re: Winter cycling boots

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 10:23am
I doubt that changing from the MW7 to another type of boot will solve the problem for you.

There are a number of things that cause cold feet and most have simple remedies
1. Shoes too tight. Counter intuitive but ware a thinner sock, unless the shoes are really too small then you will have to buy a bigger pair
2. Core temperature- If you are not insulating the upper body, blood will be drawn from the limbs were more layers on the body and legs
3. pedal speed too low, pushing too high a gear, firstly you are pushing hard on the pedals and this stops blood flow to the soles of the feet secondly Spinning improves the blood flow to the feet and legs. So use a lower gear and spin.
4 After that there are medical problems which lead to poor circulation

In terms of any of these boots Water can progress down the leg the neoprene cuff is not waterproof, but will keep most out. however socks poking out or trousers tucked inside will wick the wter a lot faster.

BTW I have the Specialized defroster, I am pleased with and have been for the last 3 winters

Re: SMIDSY? Luminous bike frames

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 10:18am
old_windbag wrote:The worry I have about the volvo stuff( produced by another company ) is having micro glass beads washed into the environment.... I know sand grains are similar but somehow it doesn't feel right. A bit like the stupidity of manufacturers putting micro beads of plastic in hand scrubbing creams that was highlighted on th television.

I think you can happily say that micro-glass-beads are precisely sand and therefore not worry about them. It's the micro-plastic-beads that are the problem.

Re: Finding and using a "rat bike" for commuting

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 10:12am
Another thing to watch out for is 27" wheels. Anything pre about 1987/88-ish will have 27" wheels. You can get 27" tyres, but you have reduced choice, may pay extra, and probably have to get it mail order. Main problem arises when the wheel itself needs replacing, as sourcing 27" wheels that will fit at proportionate cost is more of a nuisance. The real problem is not so much the rim size but that they will have narrower spacings between the forks than modern bikes. Now you can pay a wheelbuilder to get 27" wheels build on slim hubs, probably your recovered hubs, but you'll pay more for the wheels than the bike. You can force somewhat wider hubs in - it's what I do - but it takes practice to achieve it without much swearing, and makes removing the wheel for whatever purpose, be it fixing a puncture or other maintenance requirements, very annoying for the difficulty of getting it back in. Sometimes you can put a 700C in instead, but you need to check the adjustment on the brakes. I've been able to put a 700C front wheel on my "gem" but the rear has to be 27" - probably the bike will be written off when the wheel fails. For these reasons, you will find that the price difference between 1990 and 1985 bikes on ebay is really quite substantial.

Re: Touring luxuries

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 November 2015 - 10:03am
Richard Barrett wrote:I would go for a lightweight travel tripod - preferably carbon fibre - makes photography so much more interesting

I often take my GorillaPod, but a bigger, lightweight carbon tripod would be nice!

Re: Downslink works: Bramber to Shoreham-by-Sea

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 10:03am
Regarding the surface (there is a spec on the drawings but difficult to read) WSCC Highways said:
I can confirm the drawings are to the specification agreed by the Public Rights of Way department, I can also confirm the dressing specification for this scheme A to E is:
“Dressing - 100mm of Eco-Mix Type 1 (recycled product comprising concrete/brick & primary material such as limestone or granite, produced by Dudmans. Similar products may be available from other sources & are acceptable subject to prior approval). Please note: material must contain no glass.”
For those that know the local paths, the recent Walks for All and A283 alternative crossing routes used Eco-Mix as the sub-base with 'limestone dust' on top. Without the 'dust' the surface will be a bit rougher - to keep Drake happy - but maybe will drain better. Watch this space...

Re: Finding and using a "rat bike" for commuting

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 10:00am
It is tricky. I'd think carefully before buying that "Raleigh flyer" because I think for this kind of bike you really want mudguards, unless you are happy to get a wet bum on days when the road is wet. You'd need to check that it has alloy rims, because steel rims means it won't stop in the wet, though I can't tell from the listing/photo. Brakes look better than the rubbish on the cheapest bikes though. And although the chain rings are just bent tin, and will wear out quickly in regular use, at least it doesn't have cottered cranks. Also it is clear that the bike needs work - it hasn't got a chain, they acknowledge the saddle is broken, and maybe tyres and various other parts are shot.

Last time I had to replace mine, I got a gem off ebay for £60. "Gem" of course is a relative concept in the eye of the beholder, and what said beholder is capable of fixing. What I mean is that it had the bits I needed - nice size and shape, accelerates nicely, goes up hills, serviceable wheels, comes with mudguards, and I could source most of the rest as hand-me-downs. As it turned out, the rear axle was snapped, but fortunately I could scavenge a spare from the various bikes and bits in the garage. Of course, I have those hand-me-down components in boxes in the garage. I put on a hand-me-down rear carrier rack. I replaced the heavy steel single chain ring with an alloy double ring hand-me-down, put a hand-me-down front changer on, replaced the poor side-pull brakes with some lovely hand-me-down Weinmann centre pulls. I've had it for a few years now. Clearly over time gear cables snap and have to be replaced, brake blocks have to be replaced, tyres wear out, even rims wear out and are replaced by hand-me-downs. Most of that maintenance I can do on the street in town, once in a while for things like mudguard repairs done with pop rivets, I have to take the bike home.

Re: Touring luxuries

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 November 2015 - 9:58am
Sweep wrote:I seem to remember someone on here recommending a stainless steel cafettiere possibly available through the demon amazon, until i get that my favourite luxury ( i lie, a necessity) is a bialetti espresso maker.

Definitely +1 from me!

Re: Finding and using a "rat bike" for commuting

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 9:44am
I rescued a Raleigh Mtb style bike that had been abandoned at work. The saddle was torn, all the cables were rusted and the brakes were in need of new blocks. I found a saddle in my garage then spent about £30 on cables and blocks. I regreased the hubs and found a better pair of 26" tyres in the garage and the bike is now okay. Not brilliant, but okay for short trips of a mile or two. The suspension fork is frozen solid (a good thing) and the hubs have poor seals and too much play. But it is worth having for errands.

Re: Profile Of A Cycle Tourist by Pierre Roques from 1965

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 20 November 2015 - 9:35am
Formatting the article with each characteristic on a single line, reveals 41 different points. I score 31 of those. Does that make me a Cycle Tourist?

Re: Finding and using a "rat bike" for commuting

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 9:30am
[XAP]Bob wrote:I think that depends heavily on the shopper itself, especially the tyres...

It also depends on whether you are aiming to be head down for high speed, or head up to the station...
Agree with this.
Tangled Metal, what aspect of a bike would you say puts it into the 'not very nice to ride' category, that could be applied to some multi thousand pound bikes as well as wrecks from the local tip?
Going for a test ride might tell you some of what you need to know re how it rides but even just fitting different tyres as Bob says above can make a big difference, you might not be able to appreciate it at the time so could be a difficult call to make as to whether it fits what you want.
At the end of the day you have to weigh up the 'risk' of buying second hand at the lower end that fulfils the mechanical requirements you desire against the looking like it's a decent bike worth pinching.

Hope you find something that works for you.

Re: Winter cycling boots

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 9:03am
I have a pair of Northwave Celsius that I have been happy with.



They are fairly big so allow plenty of space for woolen socks. You need to make sure that there is plenty of circulation in your feet. If your shoes are tight then you will get cold regardless of what you wear.



The Northave Celsius boots are waterproof but some water will still enter through the top. I tend to wear only woolen socks underneath as it doesn't soak up as much water and still keeps some insulating properties when wet. That works well for me.

Re: Winter cycling boots

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 8:55am
I wear castelli merino wool socks ,is it worth wearing a second pair of lighter socks ?

Re: Winter cycling boots

CTC Forum - On the road - 20 November 2015 - 8:52am
Any shoe or boot, even if waterproof, will allow in water that can get in at the top, running down your leg. The only sure way to stop that is to wear waterproof trousers that are long enough to cover the top of the boots at all times.

Thin wool socks are good insulators.

And pedal hard to build up core body temperature.
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