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People wanted for cycle trip Hungary in June

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 March 2015 - 9:58am
Hi all, some friends of ours in Hungary are organising a leisurely week's cycle trip around Lake Balaton in Hungary in June & are looking for people to join them so that they can get group discounts on wine tastings etc. (It's not a commercial venture, they've just got lots of things lined up to go & see/do & want to keep costs down. They're used to organising group walking trips so it's easy for them.) They're very nice people who are completely fluent in English, & are interesting & knowledgeable - we visited them in Budapest last year & had a great time.

They've got everything set up & ready to go, it seems to be pretty cheap & should be a lot of fun. If you're interested have a look at their website
http://www.epicadventures.hu

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 March 2015 - 9:41am
22camels wrote:Don't think I'm quite yet ready for recumbents, give me a few years though

Why not? They're just bikes, but bikes (or possibly trikes) that may well solve your problems more directly and thoroughly than fiddling around with the variables on an upright. The relative lengths of your legs and arms becomes pretty much irrelevant and there will be far less strain on your neck. If those are your problems (and it seems they are) then a 'bent may be a fundamentally better way forwards.

There seems to be some weird perception that they're only for people who can't put up with "proper" bikes any more. They're not cycles of last resort, just for people with a more open mind to addressing their cycling needs. I tour on one because it does touring (my idea of it) better than any upright I'm aware of. Around town I use a Brommie or Moulton or 8 Freight (all uprights) because they do their jobs better.

Pete.

Re: Round the world on a unicycle

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 March 2015 - 9:00am
DarkNewt wrote:I am thinking:

Pro's
less weight
less tyre to puncture
less components to go wrong
Easier to get on trains aeroplanes etc..
Easier to jump off if some plank gets to close

Con's
it's a unicycle (in jest no hate mail from unicycle fans please)Also, it tends to be single speed only.

I did read somewhere(?) that it's possible to fit a SA 3sp (fixed) to one. It would certainly help on longer runs on a road.

Re: Touring frame differences

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 March 2015 - 8:43am
22camels wrote:Really appreciate your input though these are two completely separate threads, maybe I should have delayed one of them so as not to cause confusion . Re the test rides, no I've so far found it impossible to set up my desired position on any test ride bikes, because the bars always end up at least a couple of inches too low due to my high saddle height.

On the other thread I have suggested getting comfortable on your existing bike before you go shopping.
A steerer extender, a few stems, and maybe some headset spacers is a lot cheaper than buying the wrong bike.
I don't think you should be difficult to fit, have a look here.....http://www.spacycles.co.uk/info/pedaltosaddle.php...all the pictures have standard forks, you should be able to reproduce any of them on your existing bike using a steerer extender if the forks have been cut short.
Spa have test bikes, but I still think you need to get comfortable on your existing bike before you do any more shopping.

edit.. this pattern of extender...http://www.highonbikes.com/controls/handlebar-stems-road/bbb-extender-quill-to-ahead-bike-handlebar-stem-adapter.html?gclid=CJTW0ZDOz8QCFYnHtAodTUkA4g...needs more spacers, but gives continually-adjustable bar height. I have happily used them with steel steerers.

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 March 2015 - 8:33am
The way forward is to use your existing bike as a test bed to get comfortable, then get a new bike next year when you have solved the issues.

You can't "think your way" to a bike fit, particularly when you let demonstrably absurd bike myths get in the way. (eg....."short stems upset the steering"....is absurd. If you can't tell the difference in the steering going from the tops to the hoods to the drops, what difference will 30mm stem length make? You talk happily about using drops or flats on the same bike, that's much more difference than between 2 stems.)
Theres a thread here about bike fit...http://forum.ctc.org.uk/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=74985

Re: maps for the west of USA

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 March 2015 - 8:08am
I will check with my brother. I've had a little look around the USGS site and it's not obvious to me what he does. It's likely to be a few days, though before I can post on here.

Re: Best Farcility of the Year?? £210,000 Wasted?? Chicheste

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 March 2015 - 7:49am
VanDriver wrote:I'd likely join the flow of traffic as I'd feel safer and I'd be able to get on rather than wait and give way. The scheme is going to encourage some drivers to believe that they have - not only at this giratory but on the roads in general - priority over cyclists.

To be fair to them the Council's website on the changes does say:

Motorists should also be aware that cyclists are not required by law to use the cycle lane and that they have an equal right to use the main carriageway, should they choose to do so. This road position is often preferred by more confident cyclists.

Re: Round the world on a unicycle

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 March 2015 - 7:42am
He's started posting a video diary on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yooQkBzNPoc

Re: Best Farcility of the Year?? £210,000 Wasted?? Chicheste

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 March 2015 - 7:05am
There are a couple of roundabouts in Colchester where the design is so dangerous for cyclists I just get off and become a pedestrian.

Re: Best Farcility of the Year?? £210,000 Wasted?? Chicheste

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 March 2015 - 7:01am
Don't know why they don't go the whole hog and put Cyclist Dismount signs at each entry to the gyratory.

Re: Best Farcility of the Year?? £210,000 Wasted?? Chicheste

CTC Forum - On the road - 30 March 2015 - 4:48am
661-Pete wrote:I cannot figure out how any oversized roundabout aka 'gyratory', constructed usually by imposing one-way flow on existing streets, has actually improved the traffic flow.
I have no solid information, but I can imagine how they might.

When a conventional (Tee or crossroads) junction carries one road with most traffic, and one or more side roads with give-way, a roundabout gives people coming out of the side-roads a chance to get out. The larger the roundabout, the more opportunity to tune the road layout to give "straight-through" ease to some directions, and sharper curves to slow down other directions. Through this, all motorists can use the junction at the same speed, which eases merging and queueing, and maximises throughput (motorists per hour).

And the larger the roundabout is, the greater the speed at which it can be driven across, which motorists love.

But a junction that also carries cyclists should (IMHO must) meet other criteria. I want all vehicles to travel at the same speed, say 10 mph. This means slowing motorists down, heavily. It needn't mean reducing the throughput (motorists per hour) but will of course increase the time for the motorists' journeys.


Encouraging cyclists to ride on the left naturally increases the risk of left-hooks. Reducing the speed of motorists to that of cyclists, and having all road-users in the same lanes, is a better solution. Best of all, in my view, is to re-engineer so cyclists have priority. If that means bollards all over the town, so be it.

Re: Touring bike choice for people with long legs

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 March 2015 - 1:39am
22camels wrote:
Edit: I'm now even more puzzled why you say drops exacerbate the problem as it seems to me I can get the same reach and and bar height with drops as I can with straights (possibly with different frame sizes), provided I don't use the drop position on the drops. Yet I'm also a bit puzzled about Thorn having separate sizing for drops and straights frames, as it seems they're assuming a lot about how most people will use drops and straights eg if I spent most of my drop time on the tops and most of my straights time on the ergon gp5 bar ends, I would need a shorter top tube on the latter, contrary to the thorn philosophy..


The idea is that you ride with your hands on the brake hoods (comfy, good position, quick brake response). So good in fact that tandems sometimes have false stoker brake hoods. That puts you about 12 cm further forward than you would be with straights at the same level. But yes, if you go a bit further forward with bar ends on straights but ride on the shoulders of the drops it would be reversed. Bar ends give you an extra bit of height though.

Re: maps for the west of USA

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 30 March 2015 - 12:42am
Good luck.

Re: Geraint Thomas E3 Harelbeke win

CTC Forum - Racing - 29 March 2015 - 11:35pm
cycleruk wrote:Gent-Wevelgem. What a race.
Geraint showed his tenacity catching up the group after being blown into the ditch.
Not only that but chasing down every break for a deserved podium finish.

+1
I watched the whole coverage on Eurosport.I always enjoy the spring classics(more than the TdeF TBH) but today's race was a classic among classics!
G just gets better,I was amazed how quick he got back to the lead group after being literally blown off the road!
Thogh IMHO Paolini deserved the win,doing what G did in the E3.

Great TV!!!

Re: Reducing pannier weight

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 11:06pm
I've yet to put my theory into practice, but I've a spare pair of walking shoes in the pannier so that when I reach the campsite after a wet rainy ride, I have something dry to put on while the spd shoes dry out (hopefully).

Re: Is insurance for a tour in Europe a worthwhile purchase?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 11:03pm
£49 sounds a lot

My standard travel insurance covers me for cycling provided that I'm not racing...that's free from my bank

My house insurance covers my bike when I'm on holiday....cover up to £500 is included

My 4 expensive bikes are insured on the same policy for a few pound per month with ensure

I had my wallet stolen in Nice and got all my money and expenses back in 1 phone call

I had a bike accident and had a new for old replacement in a couple of weeks worth £2500

Worth it to me

Re: Touring frame differences

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 10:56pm
Really appreciate your input though these are two completely separate threads, maybe I should have delayed one of them so as not to cause confusion . Re the test rides, no I've so far found it impossible to set up my desired position on any test ride bikes, because the bars always end up at least a couple of inches too low due to my high saddle height.

Re: Best Farcility of the Year?? £210,000 Wasted?? Chicheste

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 March 2015 - 10:54pm
I cannot figure out how any oversized roundabout aka 'gyratory', constructed usually by imposing one-way flow on existing streets, has actually improved the traffic flow. Can anyone convince us that, for instance, the notorious Vogue Gyratory in Brighton has done just that? Or any other such construct, anywhere in the country?

If we're talking roundabouts, I am very much more comfortable with small roundabouts where one can see all the vehicles on the roundabout at any one time. That makes it far easier for the cyclist to judge whether it's OK to venture onto the roundabout itself, inserting him/herself into the normal traffic flow round it. Certainly I don't find any problems with negotiating such a roundabout.

Of course it is possible for the highwaymen to screw-up over a perfectly normal roundabout, for example a newish one in Haywards Heath which I've posted about before. But there's little increased risk if you ignore the 'infarcestructure' on the pavements and traverse the roundabout normally. The main danger is that hostile motorists, seeing you not on the infarcestructure, may execute a 'punishment pass'. Which on a roundabout would be extremely dangerous. I just hope every motorist I encounter has more sense.

I'm not familiar with this part of Chichester, but it seems to me that the problem lies in it being a gyratory in the first place. The problem is that all vehicles circulating on a gyratory are going to turn left at some point. That's an awful lot of left-turns, hence an awful lot of chances of a left-hook. The 'give-way' markings, I notice, favour users of the main carriageway against cyclists on the cycle lane, and I can understand why. Understand, but not condone.

Re: Round the world on a unicycle

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 March 2015 - 10:54pm
DarkNewt wrote:can you go off road? (there will be someone somewhere who has ridden up the Eiger on one)
Well a couple rode down a 3000+m mountain in the Dolomites at least


& the same guy has ridden down the 5671m high Damavand in Iran!


Re: so when do the shorts come out?

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 March 2015 - 10:44pm
Went out in shorts this arvo & despite the wind it felt quite mild, had long sleeve base layer, windproof top and a gilet on though, I must be hardening up..lol

Side winds off the open fields though..very very strong
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