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Re: Cambridge to Canterbury

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 August 2014 - 10:11pm
If you already have a route planned to Tilbury, you could detour to the Dartford crossing, where there's a free shuttle service to take cyclists across the river. There's a cycle path alongside the M25 from Thurrock to the collection point on the north side. Not the most scenic route though...

Re: Cambridge to Canterbury

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 August 2014 - 9:53pm
Hi. another vote for the cycle route alongside the river Lea and then maybe cross the river Thames on the Woolwhich ferry and follow the Thames path towards Canterbury... regards Nomisp

Re: NCN Route 1

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 August 2014 - 9:49pm
Many thanks for your reply. Getting to Inverness Monday 1st.Sept,looks like a good week weather wise next week. Dave

Re: Any ideas?

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 August 2014 - 9:32pm
Or attach some empty seats so you're as wide as a car.

Re: who will ride Vuelta a Espana 2014

CTC Forum - Racing - 29 August 2014 - 9:26pm
Stage 7 was not very exciting. Frome managed to come off - again.

Re: Any ideas?

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 August 2014 - 9:20pm
How about an extending aerial with a reflector or a small fluoro rubber ball at the end. If you have straight bars you mount it in the end and extend it at you wish. The ball doubles as a handlebar end plug On the tandem i use a cork in the rear barend with a piece of sticky reflective dayglo tape on it. It sticks out an inch extra but is very visible.

Re: Any ideas?

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 August 2014 - 9:15pm
I always think if I can reach them, they're too close, so I guess that would mean about 3 1/2 foot from centre, but then maybe a little shorter assuming they're going to give your reflector a little space.

Re: Any ideas?

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 August 2014 - 9:11pm
I'd agree with the above, try something telescopic then you can experiment.

Re: Any ideas?

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 August 2014 - 9:09pm
well for one I don't think it'll give you any change with overtaking.
However if you were to make the arm long enough to give you the minimum passing distance that you require it'll probably work Thus if you think 3 feet from your right hand then you'll have to make it almost that width to have the desired effect IMHO...
An arm that slides out further made with 2 sections and a runner would work and slide back in when pulled upright.

Re: High-vis top with zero insulation

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 August 2014 - 8:13pm
Bicycle safety is a bit like North Korea. Accident statistics are so sparse that everyone can find evidence to support their argument. But I am convinced fluorescent yellow makes me safer (except in rapeseed fields).

Re: High-vis top with zero insulation

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 August 2014 - 8:00pm
mjr wrote:Hi-vis waistcoats are available from Wickes, Screwfix, Toolstation and probably other similar industrial park builders shops. Best price found just now £2.98 http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Workwea ... 188/p43997 - I've worn a mesh waistcoat in the past and there's only very slight insulating effect, especially if you leave it flapping, which only annoyed me when it got over 30 degrees or so.

But now I don't think hi-vis is proven and carrying and using special clothes annoys me: I'm slow enough to park/unpark the bike already. I think reflectives are good and put lots on my bikes because I always have a bike with me when I ride. I tend to wear large blocks of solid colour (most often blue, and that works well because most of the time I'm riding past green countryside, red brick or sandstone buildings) in daylight. At night/twilight, I tend to wear black/white or blue/white jackets with reflective detailing.,,,,,EN 471 is the H&S standard for yellow mesh waistcoats Yes they are brilliant (in both senses). Very light and airy.
Personally I've no doubt at all about their effectiveness - you can feel the difference in driver behaviour as soon as you put one on. The reason being that the right shade of yellow plus reflective stripes can mean police, road-worker, lollipop lady, ambulance person etc and a driver on auto-pilot knows this subconsciously and isn't going to discriminate when it's just a cyclist, whereas a different colour, even if hi viz, may not trigger the same alarms.

Re: Cambridge to Canterbury

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 August 2014 - 7:53pm
Pick up National Cycle Route 1 at Harlow and follow it through the foot tunnel under the Thames at the Isle of Dogs all the way to Canterbury and Dover.

Re: High-vis top with zero insulation

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 August 2014 - 7:44pm
EN 471 is the H&S standard for yellow mesh waistcoats as worn by many whose job involves being in the road. As pointed out by others above, they are widely available from workwear suppliers and the like for under a fiver and by buying over the counter, you can check the fit and avoid p&P.

Any ideas?

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 August 2014 - 7:36pm
Thinking about making something like those reflectors on an arm that you could attach to your bike. Wondering what would be a reasonable length to expect drivers to avoid. Don't normally have a problem, but, been on main road/dual carriageway a couple of times and have had close passes with outside lane completely clear, mad. Thought I would make a drop down arm purely for main road, and flexible. Don't want to be confrontational, and perhaps use fluoro' with thanks for space written on it. Anyone have any thoughts/suggestions?

Re: 10 year ban for killing cyclist

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 August 2014 - 7:33pm
One limitation of that explanation is that it deals with the behaviour of drivers but not the reaction of others affected by it. Vulnerable road users modify their behaviour to avoid putting themselves - or their children at risk. That's relevant to cyclists.

Having mentioned children, it seems a bit rich to advance as "exceptional hardship" that if a driver is disqualified, his children's privacy will suffer.

Re: Shocking behaviour from a Range Rover Vogue

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 August 2014 - 7:29pm
Disgusting, at least a 10 year ban.....!

Re: Cambridge to Canterbury

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 August 2014 - 7:19pm
If you find yourself having to swing into London to get across the Thames, The path beside the river Lea is perfectly passable. This goes all the way to the Olympic park from as far out as Hertford if needed . I don't know if there is a train further west that would get you across.

Re: New Route Planner

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 29 August 2014 - 6:53pm
Brill! Thanks Richard. You're a star.

Re: Four 4x4's on a forty mile ride

CTC Forum - On the road - 29 August 2014 - 6:26pm
The Mechanic wrote:Living in the north east of Scotland we have a lot of 4x4 vehicles. I have not noticed any particular discourtesy shown by them than other vehicles. Unlike other posters, I do not claim this as a fact, only my observation but it seems to me that, generally speaking, drivers are a bit more considerate up here than they reportedly are in Englandshire.
I'd make a guess that this is because most people up there both need them and know how to drive them properly, because they have to be able to to get around in bad weather on narrow roads. Unfortunately that's not the case in many other places. Some people (and I stress the 'some' as I've had many positive experiences with 4x4 drivers as well) have 4x4s- especially the bigger ones- as status symbols, and drive accordingly, i.e., in an 'I'm important, me first' sort of way. They're so worried about getting any dirty mud on their shiny clean tyres and bodywork that they wont go 2" onto a verge on a narrow road to let a small car/bike/pedestrian cross alongside safely. I've had one drive me into nettles, and then reverse after me at speed when I objected.
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