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Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 3:51pm
willem jongman wrote:Instead of a smaller chainwheel you can also fit a larger sprocket on the rear. 17t will not make that much difference with 16t, but Thorn also do a 19t and that will make a rather bigger diference. I did just that, for lower gearing and less wear on chain and teeth.
I remember the Vakantiefietser in Amsterdam recommending 21t rear sprockets for the same reason a few years back. Our T400s already have 17t rear sprockets so the plan was to go down from 39t chain ring to a 36t. I decided that a 34t would make the overall gearing a bit too low.

Re: Booby Trap Warning: Tiptree, Essex

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 3:49pm
AlaninWales wrote:Vorpal wrote:AlaninWales wrote:If you can't stop because of the driver too close behind, you should have slowed further to control that driver's speed too!

Tha's all fine, and it's my normal tactic, but if someone comes up behind you, there is still a brief time in which something could occur before you (and the following driver) necessarily slow down. I don't recall the specific circumstances of my brick incident; it was 13 or 14 years ago, now. I was aware of a car close behind mine and was already slowing when I saw the brick. I presume that the driver had 'caught up' to me just before the incident, but I don't now remember for certain that this was the case.
Indeed and I'm not claiming to be perfect either, just that whenever I've had such an incident (there've been a few, fortunately no-one hurt), I've looked towards my own actions for the remedy. Considering who I am (for the most part) conversing with here, I think that is the general approach of most in this conversation. So 'criticism' is just that: Constructive raising of a different approach (and - as an advanced driver (not IAM any longer I believe) recently remarked to me: AD is about giving permission yourself to drive at the correct speed for the circumstances, which may be slower than others would).
Fair enough. It's normal for me to consider in retrospect, what I could have done differently. Although I clearly recall seeing the brick in the carriageway, and deciding that the safest choice was to hit it, I don't recall my post-incident analysis, or what I concluded. It seems to me now, that it would have been very difficult in the circumstances to avoid an incident, and I just chose the least harmful scenario. I *was* driving slower than others, which is why, I suppose, a car was passing me on the outside, and another was up my backside.

Re: Leeds Bus Drivers view of Cyclists

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 3:49pm
Vantage wrote:
Not without reason and certainly not without proof of any wrong doing.
His partner to the best of my knowledge had no part in the discussion about cyclists being fair game.

If his partner's details are on Facebook or any other website for all to see then anyone is free to tell others about them.

If you go public with your details on the internet then it is probably wise to make sure you can't be associated with people who have controversial views.

People should be careful about the company they keep.

Re: Another Cyclist Death

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 3:46pm
Clever defence lawyers are very good ar confusing thejury, who are not legalexperts.

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 3:45pm
al_yrpal wrote:My steel Salsa Vaya begins to struggle with a touring load and camping gear on the road and its just about ok on smooth surface off road unloaded. It wouldnt be suitable for a camping trip that involved off road riding. I never rode my Galaxy with camping gear on a tour but I dont think it would be ideal. It was a lively twitchy steed. I think that all the book is saying is that there are better bikes for doing a camping trip that involves off road riding. Having heard and seen peoples notions of what off road riding is on this site over the years, some peoples notions are far adrift from mine.

Al
Hi Al,
Might this have been an older galaxy? Mine is 2008 and is very stable. Mind you, if I were to go camping I think I would use the low riders on the front.

Re: Leeds Bus Drivers view of Cyclists

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 3:32pm
blackbike wrote:Bicycler wrote:Vantage wrote:I'm at a loss as to how posting his partners fb profile page here for all to see in any way adds positively to the issue of bus drivers being happy to take out cyclists. Is she a bus driver too?
Quite.

In any case, I think it is a very bad idea to go digging into and broadcasting every aspect of these drivers' lives. Their private lives are none of our concern and it does us no good to appear to be vigilantes trying to ruin people's lives. Let's focus on the issue at hand and our quite legitimate concerns, not shoot ourselves in the foot confirming the angry cyclist stereotype.

If people put the details of their lives onto the internet then they are 'fair game' for everyone to use.

I'd have no problem with ruining the livelihood of a bus driver who considers cyclists 'fair game'.

Not without reason and certainly not without proof of any wrong doing.
His partner to the best of my knowledge had no part in the discussion about cyclists being fair game.

Re: touring on a trad touring bike?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 3:32pm
Tangled Metal wrote:Ergon do grips with bar ends included. They do simple grips all the way to large bar ends that are bent at the the end to allow a greater range that normal bar ends I think.

the ones illustrated in the book are just the grips, not the integrated BE ones. They may have meant the ones with the BEs, in which case I take back my criticism, but that wasn't the impression that I got from reading it without much pre-knowledge about the ergon range.

Re: Booby Trap Warning: Tiptree, Essex

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 3:28pm
Vorpal wrote:AlaninWales wrote:If you can't stop because of the driver too close behind, you should have slowed further to control that driver's speed too!

Tha's all fine, and it's my normal tactic, but if someone comes up behind you, there is still a brief time in which something could occur before you (and the following driver) necessarily slow down. I don't recall the specific circumstances of my brick incident; it was 13 or 14 years ago, now. I was aware of a car close behind mine and was already slowing when I saw the brick. I presume that the driver had 'caught up' to me just before the incident, but I don't now remember for certain that this was the case.
Indeed and I'm not claiming to be perfect either, just that whenever I've had such an incident (there've been a few, fortunately no-one hurt), I've looked towards my own actions for the remedy. Considering who I am (for the most part) conversing with here, I think that is the general approach of most in this conversation. So 'criticism' is just that: Constructive raising of a different approach (and - as an advanced driver (not IAM any longer I believe) recently remarked to me: AD is about giving permission yourself to drive at the correct speed for the circumstances, which may be slower than others would).

Re: Another Cyclist Death

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 3:13pm
I've never understood the death by careless or inconsiderate driving offence myself. I definitely don't get why Death by Dangerous is difficult to prove. I do understand the legalities and all but the fact that a "Death by Careless" offence even exists is baffling. If the driving was careless enough to have caused a fatality, then clearly the driving was dangerous. Any "Death by ... Driving" should automatically be Dangerous driving if it is proven that the driver was at fault.

Re: Leeds Bus Drivers view of Cyclists

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 3:11pm
Bicycler wrote:Vantage wrote:I'm at a loss as to how posting his partners fb profile page here for all to see in any way adds positively to the issue of bus drivers being happy to take out cyclists. Is she a bus driver too?
Quite.

In any case, I think it is a very bad idea to go digging into and broadcasting every aspect of these drivers' lives. Their private lives are none of our concern and it does us no good to appear to be vigilantes trying to ruin people's lives. Let's focus on the issue at hand and our quite legitimate concerns, not shoot ourselves in the foot confirming the angry cyclist stereotype.

If people put the details of their lives onto the internet then they are 'fair game' for everyone to use.

I'd have no problem with ruining the livelihood of a bus driver who considers cyclists 'fair game'.

Re: trans am for novice advice needed

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 3:10pm
I've done the Southern Tier and a couple of routes further north using large sections of the Adventure Cycling routes. For the Southern Tier a Feb/March start from the west coast would work. Not my favourite route though. More sections with high traffic. More freeway shoulder sections. Less variety in the scenery.

As Boblo says you can't go far wrong with the Transam and a May/June start. An option for Missouri is the Katy Trail. Avoiding the rolling hills and shoulderless roads through much of Missouri. From Pueblo there is the option of taking the Western Express to San Francisco. A tougher rote logistically with more climbing, more long sections without services. Tremendous red rock scenery through Utah though and quiet desert riding through Nevada.

F-surlycanyon.jpg

E-surly-rockeverywhere.JPG

Re: trans am for novice advice needed

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 3:06pm
big thanks to the three of you - Vorpal, bilbo & psamathe.

Some excellent suggestions. ...leaning towards the trans am / bicentennial, possibly 66......

I shall follow up your suggestions .

Re: Booby Trap Warning: Tiptree, Essex

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 2:39pm
MartinC wrote:R2, sorry to hear about your problem. Hope all is well and recovery is complete.+1
Exactly.

Get even well-er soon. Best wishes to you and your family for the New Year.

Re: Booby Trap Warning: Tiptree, Essex

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 1:16pm
It makes sense that those slowing down for a bend are going to be rapidly caught up by those who prefer to slow down on the bend (if at all).
It is* a requisite to drive in anticipation of being able to stop in the distance you can see but not to second guess your tailgaters. I am pretty sure that far more harm will result from going even slower than from hitting a bit of road debris.

Not that I would have any reservations at all about introducing a tailgater to my towbar, if the thing infront could justify my actions. Far better they learn on a big car like mine than on a cyclist or motorcyclist.

* Though I hear an ever increasing number of cases where the liability has been partially or more applied to the obstruction.

Re: What camera?

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 1:16pm
I've had a Contour Roam 2 for a couple of years now, but I'm not over-enthused about it. It has no user interface, you can't view what you have recorded on-camera and all controls etc. (apart from start/stop recording) have to be done via the computer based support application which is - frankly - atrocious. Also in its current setting it has no night vision, although there's apparently a 'dusk' setting which I haven't tried out yet. But once again, you need a computer to change the setting.

Perhaps the old favourite GoPro is the way to 'go'. The up-to-date models are rather expensive though - but I believe you can get 'last year's GoPro a lot cheaper...

Re: Pedal power - the unstoppable growth of cycling

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 1:09pm
I saw that article before this thread. Quite positive, I think, although I'd rather have had less mention of the clothing aspect. To me, cycling is about cycling - just that - and what you wear is immaterial (no pun intended). In fact I don't have a single item of cycle-specific clothing that I can get into, nowadays, except for shoes. And as for Rapha ....

Vantage wrote:You can't even get a cycling themed Christmas card unless it's a race bike or mountain bike on the front.Maybe, but one of the OTT-Xmas-decorated houses a few streets from ours, was sporting an illuminated, and animated, Santa riding a bike. Might be better for his waistline than all those reindeer, at any rate....

Re: Booby Trap Warning: Tiptree, Essex

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 1:03pm
AlaninWales wrote:If you can't stop because of the driver too close behind, you should have slowed further to control that driver's speed too!

Tha's all fine, and it's my normal tactic, but if someone comes up behind you, there is still a brief time in which something could occur before you (and the following driver) necessarily slow down. I don't recall the specific circumstances of my brick incident; it was 13 or 14 years ago, now. I was aware of a car close behind mine and was already slowing when I saw the brick. I presume that the driver had 'caught up' to me just before the incident, but I don't now remember for certain that this was the case.

Re: trans am for novice advice needed

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 12:52pm
I did the Bicentennial route, 'mid' in your parlance? Started mid May, East to West, 67 cycling days mainly camping. This approach means the high passes in Colorado should be clear by the time you get there. Get the Adventure Cycling Association maps. They're more guides plus maps than mere maps. Also get the GPX files from the ACA if you have a Garmin, makes nav completely painless.

The support along the route is exceptional. If you're a touring novice, this will be a great introduction to touring without some of the usual angst. People are fantastic, you'll be welcomed into churches, firestations, homes, city parks etc without anything expected of you. You'll be fed, watered, entertained and looked after by complete strangers, often without being kidnapped or murdered ( ). I understand, there's more cycle traffic on the Bicentennial route than the Northern and Southern tiers and the locals are used to 'bicyclists'. If you crave solitude and really don't want to interact, of course you can but it makes a nice change to be welcomed.

The route is a great mix; towns, cities, open country, massive mountains, national forest, prairie, high plains etc. It's a real adventure. I've since toured extensively elsewhere in the US and the Trans Am is a dream treat for the first timer. Any questions, ask here or PM to avoid boring the masses

Re: trans am for novice advice needed

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 4 January 2016 - 12:51pm
welsh trekker wrote:thanks Vorpal, some good advice.

perhaps a much later start, or ...how about the central route ?....what is the earliest to start there ?

I assume the southern route is ok early on, but I assume it gets very hot in summer. too hot ?
It can be interesting to follow an old highway like Route 66 or the Lincoln Highway, and in some ways these old highways capture American culture better than many other routes. In terms of weather, you aren't much better off than on the northern route, and you might get bored with the central plains. It's interesting for a day or two, and it's nice and flat, but it can get to be a bit much.

If you want to do a central route, I'd recommend trying to pick up the Katy Trail through Missouri. it's 250ish miles on a converted rail line. I have to admit I don't know the current condition (I'm sure you can find out), but it was suitable for touring bikes when I was on it.

There is also the Trans America Trail from ACA, and if you are taking an off-road capable bike, you can use some of the 'National Trails' that are designed as hiking and equestrian routes, but are mostly useable on a bicycle, and long distance mountain bike trails. That will probably take a little more work to create a route, but some of the long distance mountain biking trails have 'hut systems' (read camping cabins) on them, and they tend to go through scenic areas, National parks, and state forests, so if that interests you, I would think it would be worth the extra work route planning.

As for the southern tier, yes it gets hot in summer. Hot and humid in the east. I would avoid the southern tier between the beginning of June and the middle of September, personally. But I'm not a hot weather kind of person.

Re: Booby Trap Warning: Tiptree, Essex

CTC Forum - On the road - 4 January 2016 - 12:42pm
R2, sorry to hear about your problem. Hope all is well and recovery is complete.
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