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Re: Not your usual "Cyclists Dismount" sign!

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 12:52pm
661-Pete wrote:meic wrote: I only ever learnt a few words like Yes and No...)

Try that in Welsh.
This is a trick question, is it not? (or am I thinking of Irish? I read somewhere that there are no words for 'yes' and 'no' in Irish...)
I've always found the Greek words for yes (ναί) and no (όχι) bewildering.
Incidentally, the Hungarian are Igen and Nem.

Strictly speaking there are simple words for yes and no in Welsh. They're 'ie' and 'nage'

It's just that you can only use them to answer particular kinds of questions - ones that don't start with a verb. Since most questions do, you have to answer using that verb in the negative or positive. Normally this is some part of 'bod' - 'to be', but not necessarily.

Re: Cycling snobbery!

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 12:51pm
teebee1986 wrote:I like your theory about a cyclist in training however, never thought of that.

I don't think it's a theory - it's quite easy to have your head down or there to have been a few cars passing obscuring your vision to the right or a few potholes demanding your attention before realising another cyclist is past you. It happens to everyone and statements like 'I wave to everyone..' should be qualified with '...that I see'. The point being you can't know if you missed an oncoming cyclist.

What I think is ruder is those that overtake you without even the merest hint of acknowledgment, this is rare but it happened to me on Sunday. I was so surprised I rather sardonically called a cheery 'Morning!' after him. What was better though was that, like a good many overtakees who have seen you as a target and upped their speed, once past they have to drop down to a more sedate pace and I'm often up their chuff without increasing my pace at all. So 500 yards later I was sitting nicely behind him.

I have to say I have been guilty of this but nowadays take more notice of how the bloke/bike looks and how he is riding before committing to an overtake. Sometimes of course I do the social thing and ride alongside them for a while!

Re: Where is your most Ideal place to go touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 June 2014 - 12:42pm
Germany - mountains if you want them, flat in the north, great cycle routes, facilities, food, not too hot in summer, nor wet and big enough to keep you occupied for years! And its pretty easy to get to

Re: BT Openreach cyclists stay back

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 12:41pm
Just spotted this example parked in our street.
Cyclists_stay_back.jpg
Sticker bang in the middle of the rear door, and it's only a small 15cwt type van.
So what's the message? Admittedly, from the position where I took this piccy, you can't see the side mirrors, so presumaby a driver couldn't have seen me. But that's true of a lot of vehicles. And the problem rests with the vehicle, not the cyclist...

Re: American looking for touring partner/s in UK or just adv

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 June 2014 - 12:39pm
I would make two suggestions, well three really, the West Coast of Scotland, the Outer Hebrides or the Pennine Cycleway from Derby to Berwick on Tweed (a signed Sustrans route). Each are from personal experience.

Speaking as an exiled southerner I'd suggest, at the danger of upsetting many(!), you will find better cycling, quieter roads, fewer people and more varied scenery in the north and Scotland.

If you want a cycle buddy for a day and do visit the north-west let me know. I can only manage a day as I'm off for two weeks in France in July.

Wherever you go use the train to get out of London and make maximum use of your time in our wonderful countryside.

Re: Cycling snobbery!

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 11:29am
Flinders wrote:teebee1986 wrote:Men forget about it,

I'm in my mid 20's, done the carbon bike thing, local team kit the works. Hated the feel of carbon, didn't like the reception of the club and the design of the kit anymore.

Went to a lovely steel frame and all plain black kit, don't really go out with the guys much now as feel uncomfortable. The last time I did (and probably the last time) the welcoming was not great, the look of horror when the carbon had disappeared and I was sporting the steeley was uncanny.

Snobbery was maximum, 1/4 the way through a club run, I snook to the back and took a sneeky left turn and enjoyed the rest of my ride and rides there after. The moral of the story is even your comrades can turn on you due to a bike type...


That's sad. Is there no other local club?
I cycle alone, I just prefer it that way, and have rarely had anyone not return a greeting. Even then, I bear in mind that someone in training for racing might be concentrating and not have seen me, whereas that's a lot less likely with a fellow slow-coach (though I wear Lycra for comfort). I always return a greeting if I see one, though once I missed one until it was too late. (other things were going on on the road).
I've exchanged greetings with a whole cycling group on one occasion, and was therefore able to warn them about a foul and slurry-puddled stretch of road ahead of them (they were strangers round here, on my map that stretch is marked out as 'the sh**ty road').
What goes around comes around.

There's another 3 if you travel far enough, that being said previously I cycled alone, it is far better I must admit. I think that's the way forward.

I like your theory about a cyclist in training however, never thought of that.

Re: Where is your most Ideal place to go touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 June 2014 - 11:07am
The next place I haven't been........

Re: Is this level of insanity commonplace?

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 10:45am
TonyR wrote:The one that puzzles me is the desperation to get past when there is an obvious stationary queue just ahead where you sail back past them.

Oh, that's easy. The idea that everyone hates traffic jams is rubbish. Some people love them so much that they will take any risk to reach one more quickly, and hence get a few extra seconds of enjoying the hold-up, albeit in exactly the same place in the queue as they could have found themselves anyway.

Re: Is this level of insanity commonplace?

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 10:05am
I think part of this is people not realising you can sometimes drive faster when following someone else than when out in front, especially in fog, so they catch up with you, think you're holding them up so overtake, then slow down, as they don't have a marker up the road to follow.

Re: Not your usual "Cyclists Dismount" sign!

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 9:58am
Mrs PB moved to Wales in her youth, around the age of 12-13 I think, as she was a beginner at Welsh, she was put in the bottom class for Welsh AND English! Despite her being one of the brightest in her year. Seems silly forcing people to learn Welsh if they don't want to, better to force them to learn a useful language they don't want to and with a lot more speakers, Chinese or Russian for example.

Although I'm always tempted to learn Welsh, just because Welsh speakers will never suspect I know what they're saying about me.

Re: Is this level of insanity commonplace?

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 9:51am
The one that puzzles me is the desperation to get past when there is an obvious stationary queue just ahead where you sail back past them. When I'm in that position driving I'll pootle behind and am very rarely delayed because I still catch up with the queue in front although it may take slightly longer to get to it.

Re: Where is your most Ideal place to go touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 June 2014 - 9:50am
patpalloon wrote:jamesgilbert wrote:Outer Hebrides in nice weather in May. Why? Scenery, quiet roads, the sea, a few ferries to break up the cycling, wildlife, a good mix of flat and hilly.

I'm going there in July. Why May? Is is better weather, quieter?

Having lived there for 2 years the best weather is May, June and September. July and August tend to be rainier. If you are lucky in the other months a nice high pressure area sits over Scotland and you get stable dry weather. In August the high sits over Europe and the wet stuff slides over Scotland.

To answer the original post, Spain in September / October presses most buttons for me for credit card touring, lightly loaded, staying in Fondas, Pensions or just a room over a bar. Italy would come a close second. Warmish weather, cycle-friendly people, lots to see, gorgeous food.

Re: Not your usual "Cyclists Dismount" sign!

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 9:26am
meic wrote: I only ever learnt a few words like Yes and No...)

Try that in Welsh.
This is a trick question, is it not? (or am I thinking of Irish? I read somewhere that there are no words for 'yes' and 'no' in Irish...)
I've always found the Greek words for yes (ναί) and no (όχι) bewildering.
Incidentally, the Hungarian are Igen and Nem.

Re: Cycling snobbery!

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 8:59am
reohn2 wrote:Lucyhan wrote:I think some of the young men on road bikes going very fast just get into the 'zone'.
When out in the Cheshire lanes I very often come across some of the pros Geraint Thomas,Ed Clancey,etc,quite a few of the pro ladies and the para Olympic riders too.
These folks are out training and they're fast,25mph+ fast,they always speak and wave whether I'm solo or we're on the tandem.
I passed a Sky rider coming the other way on Tuesday,he waaas flying,but still nodded and said how do to an old fart on a touring bike.
It's the recognition of another cyclist whatever they're age or bike/attire or ability and it's the wannabies who are so far up their own bottom brackets who don't IME.
Whatever they may just be having a bad day, I know I go cycling when I am feeling down about something.
The wannabies are always having a bad day

We were stopped at the side of the road on Wednesday whilst I rubbed a smear of vaseline on squeaky cleat,when a young chap on Specialized CF race bike all ripped up in black and red and as fit as,stopped and asked if we were OK,nice chap .
There was a time when out down the lanes,every cyclist 'let on' whatever they were riding,times change..........

That's nice. In most professions, the real top pros are friendly, as they have nothing to prove, it's the wannabes who 'are on thier dignity' all the time.
Someone once stopped to check I was okay, and I've done the same for other people. Why not? One chap, part of a group out together, was stopped with a p*ncture outside our house (we're a bit rural here so no shops/facilities for miles). Mr Ortho saw him while walking back from the allotment and offered the use of a high pressure pump. The bloke was astounded at his luck!
The world would be a much nicer place if we all looked out for each other. It costs nowt and makes a big difference to both the helped and the helper's happiness.

Re: Cycling snobbery!

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 8:50am
teebee1986 wrote:Men forget about it,

I'm in my mid 20's, done the carbon bike thing, local team kit the works. Hated the feel of carbon, didn't like the reception of the club and the design of the kit anymore.

Went to a lovely steel frame and all plain black kit, don't really go out with the guys much now as feel uncomfortable. The last time I did (and probably the last time) the welcoming was not great, the look of horror when the carbon had disappeared and I was sporting the steeley was uncanny.

Snobbery was maximum, 1/4 the way through a club run, I snook to the back and took a sneeky left turn and enjoyed the rest of my ride and rides there after. The moral of the story is even your comrades can turn on you due to a bike type...


That's sad. Is there no other local club?
I cycle alone, I just prefer it that way, and have rarely had anyone not return a greeting. Even then, I bear in mind that someone in training for racing might be concentrating and not have seen me, whereas that's a lot less likely with a fellow slow-coach (though I wear Lycra for comfort). I always return a greeting if I see one, though once I missed one until it was too late. (other things were going on on the road).
I've exchanged greetings with a whole cycling group on one occasion, and was therefore able to warn them about a foul and slurry-puddled stretch of road ahead of them (they were strangers round here, on my map that stretch is marked out as 'the sh**ty road').
What goes around comes around.

Re: Not your usual "Cyclists Dismount" sign!

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 8:49am
iviehoff wrote:Ben@Forest wrote:Welsh is not a particularly good living language. I remember hearing a Welsh speaker say how wonderful it was that they were still using a language that hadn't changed since the 13th century - which sounds great until you realise it would mean in English we'd all be going around talking like the characters in the Canterbury Tales. And in the 13th century dismounting a bike was not a big talking point for Welsh speakers - but it does make you wonder how they ever described getting off a horse.
This is nonsense. The language has continued to be used as vernacular, and languages used as vernacular always assimilate the change necessary to make them adequate to the situation. If you have ever seen bilingual signs in English and German, you will realise that sometimes some languages seem to take a lot of time to say certain common things, but this doesn't make them "not very good" languages. Welsh has even quite noticeably changed since the 1960s edition of Teach Yourself Welsh I once owned, if you compare that with a modern tutor. Similar claims about Icelandic being just like it was 800 years ago are sometimes made, but not by anyone who has ever compared the original texts of Icelandic sagas with translations into modern Icelandic. Icelandic has retained certain grammatical features of old Norse that continental Scandinavian languages have lost, thus making it easier for Icelandic people to pick up the grammar of Old Norse, but it doesn't mean that Old Norse at all mutually comprehensible with modern Icelandic, or that Icelandic is in any sense a language in which it is "difficult" to express modern ideas. Likewise Welsh people who do have indeed read mediaeval Welsh/Icelandic know that it is about as difficult as Chaucer to read for an Englishman.

I'm happy to stand corrected but I did hear the '13th century' comment from someone who should therefore have known better. I was in a Welsh youth hostel and there was a party of kids there who were being encouraged to speak Welsh by their teacher or instructor (though this evidently didn't come naturally or easily to many/all of them). I was earwigging as you often do when in such situations so heard the 13th century claim (she was going on about poetry in Welsh).

However I would to some extent stand by the comment that Welsh is not a 'good' living language. I speak good German (having lived in Germany) and would say the same about German, it is nowhere near as flexible as English as it often lacks the ability to add or develop new words (its long compound words are hilarious - try Rindfleischetikettierungsüberwachungsaufgabenübertragungsgesetz. And unlike English the German language 'authorities' suffer a great deal of angst about how many English words are added to German dictionaries every year (see what I did there?). Frankly if Welsh was a really good living language it wouldn't have declined so much in the first place.

Re: Is this level of insanity commonplace?

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 8:41am
Some drivers can't tolerate a car in front of them, even if that car is doing the limit. When they have overtaken, which they will do regardless of bends, solid white lines, oncoming traffic which has to brake, or indeed anything, they may even go slower that the original car was doing. I have no idea why some drivers think this way. I see they do, but just can't understand why.

It's even worse with bikes, in that some drivers classify all bikes as slow moving and will overtake on the assumption that the bike is only doing walking pace. They then find the bike is doing 20mph or more and takes a lot longer to overtake than they thought.

Yoga or stretches for touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 June 2014 - 8:35am
Hey! Just wondering if anyone has suggestions for any stretches to help with stiff muscles when touring? I'm finding especially when I take a break for a few days in a city I end up all stiff so want to try and do something preventative to stop in happening!

Thanks in advance!

Re: Where is your most Ideal place to go touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 13 June 2014 - 8:00am
How long is a bit of string?

If I want to go away for 3 or 4 days with minimal hassle then it's East Anglia because its close to home. Easy cycling, good scenery and plenty of camp sites and pubs.

For my long winter tours its usually S E Asia. For me its got everything at a fairly cheap price. Recently I have started heading further east and last year was in Taiwan - that was brilliant for cycle touring. This autumn I am off to Japan. Will include a bit of Malaysia and Thailand at the end as the weather will be too cold in Japan after November.

Time available, accom requirements, budget, etc make 'ideal place to go touring' a very personal thing.

Re: Cycling snobbery!

CTC Forum - On the road - 13 June 2014 - 7:42am
Men forget about it,

I'm in my mid 20's, done the carbon bike thing, local team kit the works. Hated the feel of carbon, didn't like the reception of the club and the design of the kit anymore.

Went to a lovely steel frame and all plain black kit, don't really go out with the guys much now as feel uncomfortable. The last time I did (and probably the last time) the welcoming was not great, the look of horror when the carbon had disappeared and I was sporting the steeley was uncanny.

Snobbery was maximum, 1/4 the way through a club run, I snook to the back and took a sneeky left turn and enjoyed the rest of my ride and rides there after. The moral of the story is even your comrades can turn on you due to a bike type...
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