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Re: no wonder...

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 April 2015 - 5:42pm
Don't hound him. He was only trying to get to Barking...

Re: Sad news from Nottingham

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 April 2015 - 4:01pm
The whole ring road has a wide pavement that's been turned into a reasonable cycle path, separated from the road by a grass verge mostly, with toucan crossings at most of the junctions. NCN route 6 passes within 200 yards of where this accident happened. I'd have been on that rather than the Ring Road path at this point. The western section of the ring road has reasonable paths throughout. They do get a bit more disjointed on the northern section, but this accident was on the western section, nears the ring road/A52 junction.

The council/HA have spent quite a bit of money in recent years to get the path up to standard (sometimes at the expense of other routes within the city).

Can't vouch for the signage but anyone local would know it's safer on the path.

Re: Sad news from Nottingham

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 April 2015 - 3:53pm
TrevA wrote:So sad but there is really no need for her to have been on the road at that point. There's a perfectly adequate cycle path on that stretch of road. I'm not normally in favour of segregation but it makes sense on the constantly busy, 4 lane racetrack that is the Nottingham Ring Road.
And it's well signed, obvious that it stays swept and the surface quality continues and where it will gracefully renter the road network?

No? Oh...

I only ask because without any confidence that a track doesn't turn into a single track, MTB only, path after a few hundred yards before dropping you onto the M6 why would you take it?

Re: fewer motorists fined for mobile use

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 April 2015 - 3:51pm
iviehoff wrote:... give them the fines and there is incentive for abuse; don't give them the fines and they have no reason to operate the cameras at all. Economic theory suggests that there must be a better place part way between where they get a share of the fines, but not so much as to give them a strong incentive to run it as an abusive money-maker.
So if a lot of motorist choose of their own free will to break the law, then it is an abuse to catch and fine them??? With that attitude, there is no hope for the rest of us.

Re: Sad news from Nottingham

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 April 2015 - 3:09pm
So sad but there is really no need for her to have been on the road at that point. There's a perfectly adequate cycle path on that stretch of road. I'm not normally in favour of segregation but it makes sense on the constantly busy, 4 lane racetrack that is the Nottingham Ring Road.

Re: Trailer vs Panniers

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 April 2015 - 3:04pm
Actually the 525lb leg press came from a year or two of going a lot to the gym and walking in the hills too. At that time my poor old bike had about 3 or 4 years with at most 2 or 3 outings a year. I feel really bad for my old faithful steed looking back. It was a £450 Reynolds tubed road bike weighing 9.5 kg actual weight for a XL size and is now about 25 years old. It has never given me any problems until about 4 years ago I realised I could not remember when I had changed the brake blocks as I was accelerating down a steep hill with my brake levers being squeezed as hard as I could (until my knuckles were white) just before a sharp right turn. Shortly after that my quill steerer just became a bit dodgy and indeed scary so I stopped riding it.

That old bike, looking back at it, never caused me any trouble in at leat 21 years of on and off use. It never creaked, broke anything and even the wheels were easy to true by eye when they did go out of true on the dodgy roads near work. I hear other cyclists go past making a bit of a racket and they never seemed phased by the noise. When I rode that old bike it only had a little bit of road noise and the wind through the wheels. no creak from pedals, gears, chains or anything. All that reliability for £450 25 years ago. I wonder what price that works out now? Was sold as a race ready road bike.

no wonder...

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 April 2015 - 3:00pm
When dogs can drive, it's no wonder that driving standards are deteriorating...

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015 ... are_btn_fb

Re: fewer motorists fined for mobile use

CTC Forum - On the road - 22 April 2015 - 2:15pm
thirdcrank wrote:Even without privatisation of that type, camera enforcement has been characterised as being income-driven. I think it's fair to say that the reluctance of some chief police officers to use more speed cameras has its roots here. I get the impression that "cash-strapped" local authorities have no such qualms, but E Pickles is keen to put a stop to it.

The police's reluctance to use more cameras these days comes from the fact that it costs them - someone else gets all the revenue. Some forces even closed all cameras down because of the budget cuts in the recession. You seem to have a choice between two bad places, give them the fines adn there is incentive for abuse; don't give them the fines and they have no reason to operate the cameras at all. Economic theory suggests that there must be a better place part way between where they get a share of the fines, but not so much as to give them a strong incentive to run it as an abusive money-maker.

Camera enforcement is commonly used in privately run car parks, and we know there is enforcement abuse by some cowboys. There is even greater potential for it to be abused in public parking enforcement, and I can therefore understand, in part, Mr Pickles' reluctance to allow it, as we would not wish our councils to be tempted by the potential gains from high productivity extortion.

Re: Trailer vs Panniers

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 April 2015 - 2:00pm
Tangled Metal wrote:I've always been one to mash it with higher gears. ... More recently I used to go to the gym a lot and leg press over 525lb for fun ...
I had to take a few weeks out in the past for knee trouble

Could there be a relationship?

Re: Trailer vs Panniers

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 April 2015 - 1:55pm
I've always been one to mash it with higher gears. That was ever since getting my first road bike at 17 whilst living on top of a hill with 1 in 4 slopes up most routes I took to get home. The road bike must have been highly geared too. I certainly struggled a bit when I first got it. I have that bike still and rode it for about 22 or 23 years. I guess with only 14 gears and no granny gear at all makes you strong.

More recently I used to go to the gym a lot and leg press over 525lb for fun (couldn't increase the weights as I had run out so had to do about 20 reps in about 5 sets to feel like I had worked out those muscles. I have lost a hell of a lot of leg strength and fitness since I met my partner and we had a kid though (different priorities). Back in the day I would still have felt that hill with the load but I would have cruised it a bit. Even just 3 years ago it was unusual for me to struggle on steep hills. I have had about 2 orf 3 months out and I did read an article where an expert un fitness said it takes about 3 times as long to get back to your old level as the time you were out of action. Not sure how right but when I had to take a few weeks out in the past for knee trouble I found it was a few months to get back to where I was.

Right now I am about 3 months out of commuting and cycling for fun and fitness. Before that break I was actually on a major plateau in performance (well even dropped a bit and was struggling). So now with a new bike I need to get used to it and also re-gain and improve on my previous fitness levels. I guess I am on a low level and even with a week and a half back on my bike commuting my commute times and speeds have gone from nearly 40 minutes and 10mph to 30 minutes and about 15mph at my recent best time. I find that is often the case, rapid initial progress then plateau and even a tailing off of performance. Intend to get a HRM and try to take it seriously this time. Although my training time is limited to two half hour to 35 minute commutes each week day. At other times it is family stuff and easy rides with family (or other jobs and activities off the bike).

Re: Don't forget you know who - Sunday

CTC Forum - Racing - 22 April 2015 - 1:39pm
Hi,
I understand its per month and the smaller amount is 12 months subs, Ta,

Re: Trailer vs Panniers

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 April 2015 - 1:25pm
Mr. V doesn't cycle much, so I have always hauled the extra load, trailer, kids, whatever... I still let him set the pace, except on the hills, where, especially with the tandem, I go at whatever pace I think will get me up the hill, and if we are separated, we can rejoin each other at the top.

I don't mind, but I wouldn't do it without properly low gears.

Re: Trailer vs Panniers

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 April 2015 - 1:16pm
ferdinand wrote:My third suggestion would o be an equal opportunities cyclist, and encourage your partner to take some more load while you "get fit". Good luck with that !

Ferdinand
Luck? Need it to get that. Although to be fair it is probably as much my male pride that I take more of the load. She is the one with any touring experience (I have none so far). Touring the likes of China for 3 months self supported going cross country, plus south america, eastern Europe and IIRC Malaysia too you tend to be capable of carrying a load I think. China was done in a locally made bike too.

Last Sunday was really a case of me pulling everything including my 13kg son. We seriously did not expect him to last long in the trailer so the load was expected to be evened out that trip but he insisted on staying in the trailer. Never had that before so we took that as a kind of victory and a kind of good foreboding for the touring idea. Last year we didn't feel like we were able to tour because he was not happy to go for a trip solely in the trailer. If he is accepting, even preferring the trailer it makes things easier for a tour i think. Of course that means we will have to even out the load better. My idea is a cargo trailer and a child trailer split between us. That way we could have a more even load split. The alternative is we both have panniers and I have the trailer. I doubt that would end up being as even a split somehow.

I am out of my old levels of fitness and suspect once that slope would not have been as much of an issue even with the trailer load weight. Plus I had to stop near the start of it (part way up the steepest part) due to a problem with my clothing. Starting off was nearly impossible but I managed it, took a lot off effort and set me off badly for the rest of the slope. Plus the hill was immediately after a slow turn into the side road. You can not maintain any speed because of the 90 degrees turn and also before the turn it was a bit of a rise down a single carriage road with cars going opposite ways having to pull in to get past each other. Not an easy way to go even if better load split was possible.

Re: Trailer vs Panniers

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 April 2015 - 12:52pm
I make that gear range something like 37" to 125" based on 700c wheels, which is ridiculous, or perhaps 5-10% lower on 26", which is still ridiculous .

I think my first suggestion would be, rather than swapping out your cassette, also consider swapping out your chain set for an MTB one or even a triple. I did this at Christmas and ended up with a 42-28 instead of 50-34, which gave me a 22" gear for touring and the Peak District. It was a revelation.

My second suggestion would be to consider an e-bike or two, or a mod kit, which takes an adjustable part of the pedal effort, and is particularly useful for keeping steep hills and heavy loads within normal limitations? Assistance is normally limited to about 16.5mph, so is in your preferred speed range. You'll need to do some homework and playing around first, though.

My third suggestion would o be an equal opportunities cyclist, and encourage your partner to take some more load while you "get fit". Good luck with that !

Ferdinand

Re: Singlewheel trailers - experiences and modifications

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 April 2015 - 12:14pm
This is your lucky day theDaveB - seems like sjs has the solid axle nuts in stock!!!!! Get them while you can..

http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/m-wave-adapters-for-10mm-solid-type-axle-for-single-40-trailer-prod35882/

from

http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/trailer-spares-dept851/

and also the nasty skewers......

http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/m-wave-qr-skewer-for-single-wheel-trailer-prod23795/

just check with the experts here that solid axles are 10mm thread, must be I think

Re: Singlewheel trailers - experiences and modifications

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 April 2015 - 11:45am
mercalia wrote:theDaveB maybe contact them to see if they will sell u the solid axle part?

Cheers, sent them a message.

Dave

Re: Trailer vs Panniers

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 April 2015 - 11:34am
Where is Mick F? I thought he would have been along by now.

Re: England to Sweden

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 22 April 2015 - 11:27am
honesty wrote:Vorpal wrote:Other than the side of the road, the most significant difference in traffic law is that at uncontrolled junctions (not roundabouts), priority is to the right. Uncontrolled junctions are quite common on cycle routes in towns and cities in Scandinavia. Car drivers will often cede priority to cyclists, but in theory, at least, priority remains with traffic coming from the right. I think this applies in most European countries, but uncontrolled junctions are not very common in other places I have been.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Priority_to_the_right

It is not legal to cycle on the pavement in Denmark. It is in Norway and Sweden. However, legal priority is given to pedestrians.

Norwegian HC in English http://www.vegvesen.no/en/Traffic/Norwe ... ffic+rules

Traffic rules for Sweden http://www.swedishroadsafety.se/general ... rules.html

Thanks. Is there something about you having to use cycle lanes in some parts of Belgium as well? Or am I making that up?
Yes, cyclists have to use facilities (when provided) in Belgium and the Netherlands. They tend to be to a good standard in Belgium, though not as good as in the Netherlands. Right hooks can be a problem on cycle tracks that run parallel to the road. It's best to slow down for junctions and check over one's left shoulder, even if cyclists have priority. Cyclists can ride in pedestrianised areas such as town centres, and it's often quicker to go through towns and cities on a bicycle than it is to go around. http://www.fietsroute.org/Long-Distanceroutes-LF.php has long distance routes in Belgium.
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