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Re: Where is your most Ideal place to go touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 June 2014 - 9:53pm
Zambia-Zimbabwe or Mozambique for the friendly people.
Namibia, South Africa/Lesotho for the scenery
Botswana for endless miles of the same scenery and easy wild camping.
USA for the national parks

Lakes or West Scotland for most of the above but with crappy weather

You may want to be a little more specific about your wishes and aims

Re: Learning to ride on the road with a mountain bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 June 2014 - 9:37pm
Audax67 wrote:
As Si observed, MTBs are not the best bikes for the road. If you ever do move over to a pukka asphalt eater you'll be amazed how much faster it goes.

Hmm I think it was BMXs that were disparaged for road riding. In most parts of England the best way of avoiding traffic is to find routes with off-road sections. An "asphalt eater" that can't cope with a slightly rough surface is too limiting.

NCN 72 Tindale to Lambley

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 June 2014 - 9:07pm
Has anyone ridden the odd bit of NCN 72 that meets the Alston to Haltwhistle cycle route at Lambley?
Is it accessable at its Western end at Tindale via the short stretch of road that leaves the A689 at Woodend (GR NY622594)? Also, is the path suitable for touring bikes or is it really for mountain bikers?
Thanks in advance if anyone can provide information.

Re: CTC Insurance

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 June 2014 - 8:51pm
CTC insurance, along with other specialist insurance seems outrageously expensive to me. The last time I checked, it would cost more to insure my expensive, best bike, than it does to insure my car. If you have home insurance, you can usually add cycles to it, including cover whilst travelling abroad etc., and this will cost only a small (if any) supplement to your existing premium. All insurers will require the bike to be kept safely overnight however, usually in a locked building.

If this doesn't suit your requirements, hopefully you'll get some recommendations here about locks. Given that you've done these trips before on your old Dawes, I'm tempted to say that since you've not had any problems before, maybe you'd be OK again, despite the more expensive bike!

Re: Somerset Tour

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 June 2014 - 7:19pm
Thanks to Cycle Tramp and everyone else. I am just back from a 1-week test cycle-camping tour of the East Anglia coast, during which the knee held up quite well. Hopefully Somerset is next, in a couple of weeks. Camping v non-camping remains a unsettled, we shall see.

CTC Insurance

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 June 2014 - 6:48pm
Has anyone had experience of the CTC recommended cycle insurance. For the last 10 years I have taken my holidays on a bike, mainly in France and Belgium. I have never bothered about insuring my rather old unloved Dawes Galaxy, but I have just bought a brand new touring bike which was rather expensive. The CTC recommended insurance has so many exclusions and requirements that I cannot image they would ever pay-out if my bike was stolen. I would welcome and comments about locks and "electronic tags".
Phil

Re: Learning to ride on the road with a mountain bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 June 2014 - 6:42pm
Hi,
Audax67 wrote:As Si observed, MTBs are not the best bikes for the road. If you ever do move over to a pukka asphalt eater you'll be amazed how much faster it goes.
But they CAN be the most comfortable, and already come with triple clanger
They are also in abundance at the recycling centres.....dumped for next years model...........

Slow......different technique but maybe only as much as 1 MPH at 15 MPH I.M.O......with some good not pure slick tyres.......

Re: Learning to ride on the road with a mountain bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 June 2014 - 6:38pm
Hi,
Mark1978 wrote:a small group passed me two on BMX and one on a ordinary hybrid, but he had the seat down as low as it could go, presumably to make it look similar to a BMX, looked like he was trying to pedal while sitting in an arm chair.
I was on one of my rides along a valley route and went past a 15 - 16 year old kid on a BMX low saddle and he managed to stay with me for several miles at 16 mph

Re: Cycling the Canal du Midi

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 June 2014 - 6:36pm
I have cycled the Canal du Midi twice. I loved it; they were two of the best holidays I have every had. I did it with a friend about 8 years ago and then went back the following year with my wife. The first time we went from Toulouse to Adge and did not go all the way to where the canal meets the Mediterranean and then came back by train. The following year we took the train to Agde and I was determined to start at the point where the canal joins the sea. It is worth going to the start, but the first few miles are impossible to bike. Someone mentioned the tree roots and the dust - yes they are right, but just take your time. The weather will be wonderful and for much of the time you will bike in the shade of the trees. We stayed in some small villages in bed and breakfasts. Found some wonderful restaurants in the most unexpected small villages a little off the canal. We did not book any accommodation apart from our night in Carcassonne. We took a leisurely trip biking no more than 40 miles a day - sometimes as little as 20 miles. I wish I was coming, but this year I am off to Bruges - on a bike!
Good luck Phil

Re: Cycling Santander to Granada via the Portuguese Coast.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 June 2014 - 5:48pm
Your best bet will be to use the Camino de Santiago routes.
- from Santander you could use the Northen route to Santiago.
- from Santiago you could use either the Portuguese coastal route or the Via the la Plata route to head south.

I have done some of these routes and they will give several advantages :
- More or less marked routings, gps trakcs, etc.
- Abundance of accomodation and camp sites, etc.
- Scattered cycle shops along the route.

If you do a search for Camino de Santiago you will find many sites with maps, gps coordinates, etc.

Good luck !

Re: Learning to ride on the road with a mountain bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 June 2014 - 4:42pm
Audax67 wrote:Having to ingest the Highway Code is a hell of a hurdle. Reaching the age of 15 without knowing enough to survive is highly unlikely unless you've been living in a retreat on top of a mountain.


You'd be surprised!

Cycling Santander to Granada via the Portuguese Coast.

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 June 2014 - 2:56pm
Hi all, it's my first post so I apologise in advance for any errors in etiquette.

I'm looking into cycling from Santander to Granada along the north coast of Spain then along the Portuguese Coast and then along the south coast of Spain and inland to Granada. I will be riding my specialised tourer which is built for such an undertaking. I have been searching online for advice from people who have cycling this, or a similar route before, as I haven't cycled on the continent before.

I can't seem to find any websites with route maps and only scattered articles on cycling a similar route. Is there anyone who can help?

Kate
=)

Re: Learning to ride on the road with a mountain bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 June 2014 - 2:28pm
If you can ride on the road in a sensible manner, not cut people up, make unexpected moves or otherwise behave like a complete tit, then you're already doing better than most of your age group and much of the population at large.

Re: Sleeping bag or not ?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 June 2014 - 2:26pm
Thanks Fatty - Just bought the snugpak jungle bag and it looks the business

Re: Learning to ride on the road with a mountain bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 June 2014 - 2:18pm
Having to ingest the Highway Code is a hell of a hurdle. Reaching the age of 15 without knowing enough to survive is highly unlikely unless you've been living in a retreat on top of a mountain. Main elements are keep left, obey the lights, signal before changing lane or direction, don't surprise other road users, try not to fulfil pedestrians' death-wishes, and if it's bigger than you give way even though you're in the right. Road craft is a different kettle from the Code, and books about it can even be interesting.

As Si observed, MTBs are not the best bikes for the road. If you ever do move over to a pukka asphalt eater you'll be amazed how much faster it goes.

Place available on Way of the roses 27th June

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 June 2014 - 1:47pm
I've just posted it in the 'on the road' forum.

Sorry, may be wrong forum, but it's there now anyway.

Ian

Re: Learning to ride on the road with a mountain bike?

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 June 2014 - 1:44pm
I thank God that when I was growing up BMXs were so last year and everybody had moved on to early mountain bikes (rigid like amenahmw's). I also had access to an old ten speed which were also something that had been fashionable briefly (for those too old for BMXs). Okay the tyres on the mountain bikes were useless for road, but everything else made them good all-purpose bikes. A rare case of fashion and utility combining.

amenahmw, good luck with getting used to riding on the roads. You will probably have picked up more than you think about the rules of the road by observing others. It probably won't be as alien as it seems. Something like the highway code may seem daunting but a lot of the rules are fairly obvious or common sense and quite a few are not all that relevant to bikes. If it all seems difficult at first it is well worth persisting with as things only get easier with experience.

Good luck

Re: Where is your most Ideal place to go touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 June 2014 - 1:15pm
I forgot to add Southern China, especially Yunnan, to my list.

If you like hills and wonderful scenery its the place to go. The Chinese have built motorways parallel but not close to most of the main roads, leaving them empty for cyclists. Lots of places for food, etc and towns every 50kms or so with good cheap hotels.

The people are friendly and sometimes a bit shocked to see foreigners, but very safe. Weather is good in our winter as it is on the tropic, not too hot.

Lots of culture and old towns to break up the pedalling. Not to mention a 40km hill to break up the culture!

Re: Where is your most Ideal place to go touring?

CTC Forum - Touring & Expedition - 17 June 2014 - 1:00pm
gloomyandy wrote:Tigger when/where are you going to in the Hebrides? Will be up there in a rented cottage on North Uist during July, with our bikes. Would be happy to provide a pot of tea if you are passing!

Andy
Hey Andy, great to hear from you. I'd love to share that pot of tea ...

...but I'll be in Uig, Lewis - first week of July - reccying properties for my hostel-to-be!!! (Did you see my thread? viewtopic.php?f=15&t=86110&start=15#p776461)

Re: Double-white line

CTC Forum - On the road - 17 June 2014 - 12:11pm
FatBat wrote:Bicycler wrote:If they mean that the 1.2m cycle lane + 3.2m general traffic lane provide enough space for a car driver to pass a cyclist obediently riding in the gutter then they are probably right. If they are suggesting that a cyclist can be overtaken safely entirely within a 3.2m lane then that is worrying.
Yep, that is what they are suggesting.

Cycle Infrastructure Design (which they claim to have followed) says that overtaking vehicles should be able to leave 1.5m clearance when overtaking a cyclist on a 30mph road. (This is a 40mph road, so one would expect the recommended clearance to be more than that.) A typical car is about 2m wide (a Fiesta is 1.958m wide, according to What Car). So, it is impossible for a Fiesta to safely pass a cyclist within a 3.2m wide lane. QED.

No - a bicycle has negative width, everyone knows that...
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